Guide.ArduinoMini History

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November 24, 2014, at 04:22 PM by Arturo -
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Guide to the Arduino Mini

To get started with the Arduino Mini, follow the directions for the regular Arduino on your operating system (Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), with the following modifications:

to:

Guide to the Arduino Mini

To get started with the Arduino Mini, follow the directions for the regular Arduino on your operating system (Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), with the following modifications:

November 24, 2014, at 04:21 PM by Arturo -
Changed lines 9-10 from:
  • To upload a new sketch to the Arduino Mini, you need to press the reset button on the board immediately before pressing the upload button in the Arduino environment.
to:
  • To upload a new sketch to the Arduino Mini, you need to press the reset button on the board immediately before pressing the upload button in the Arduino environment.
November 24, 2014, at 04:21 PM by Arturo -
November 24, 2014, at 12:59 PM by Angelo Scialabba -
November 24, 2014, at 12:58 PM by Angelo Scialabba -
May 08, 2012, at 10:55 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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You can use a USBSerial connector wired up in a similar fashion :

May 08, 2012, at 10:50 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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May 08, 2012, at 10:47 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The microcontroller (an ATmega168) on the Arduino Mini is a physically smaller version of the chip on the USB Arduino boards, with the following small difference:

to:

The microcontroller (an ATmega328) on the Arduino Mini is a physically smaller version of the chip on the USB Arduino boards, with the following small difference:

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  • Don't connect more than 9 volts to the +9V pin or reverse the power and ground pins of your power supply, or you might kill the ATmega168 on the Arduino Mini.

  • You can't remove the ATmega168, so if you kill it, you need a new Mini.
to:
  • Don't connect more than 9 volts to the +9V pin or reverse the power and ground pins of your power supply, or you might kill the ATmega328 on the Arduino Mini.

  • You can't remove the ATmega328, so if you kill it, you need a new Mini.
Changed lines 39-40 from:

Mini 04 pinout (the ground on the left has moved down one pin)

to:

Mini 04 and 05 pinout (the ground on the left has moved down one pin)

May 06, 2012, at 10:16 PM by Tom Igoe -
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Here is a photo showing the Arduino Mini connected to the Mini USB adapter. Notice that the reset pin is connected directly to +5V (the orange wire), without a pushbutton. Thus, to reset the Arduino Mini, you will need to unplug and reconnect the USB cable to the Mini USB Adapter, or manually move the orange wire connected to the reset pin from +5V to ground and back.

to:

The circuit shown here is the basic setup for an Arduino mini connected to a USB-to-serial converter. You can see power and ground from the USB are run to the rails of the breadboard so it's convenient for the other components on the board. The 0.1uF capacitor from the reset pin is connected to the RTS pin on the mini USB adaptor. This enables auto-reset when the serial port is opened, meaning you don't have to press the reset button every time you upload new code. If it gives you problems, you can remove it, and press reset every time.

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December 08, 2008, at 12:43 AM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 9-10 from:
  • To upload a new sketch to the Arduino Mini, you need to press the reset button immediately before pressing the upload button in the Arduino environment.
to:
  • To upload a new sketch to the Arduino Mini, you need to press the reset button on the board immediately before pressing the upload button in the Arduino environment.
December 08, 2008, at 12:43 AM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 9-10:
  • To upload a new sketch to the Arduino Mini, you need to press the reset button immediately before pressing the upload button in the Arduino environment.
January 26, 2008, at 12:05 AM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 3-4 from:

To get started with the Arduino Mini, follow the directions for the Arduino NG on your operating system (Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), with the following modifications:

to:

To get started with the Arduino Mini, follow the directions for the regular Arduino on your operating system (Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), with the following modifications:

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Selecting ATmega168 in the Arduino Environment

To tell the Arduino environment that you're using an Arduino Mini, which has a different chip than the regular Arduino, you need to select ATmega168 from the Tools | Microcontroller menu.

January 26, 2008, at 12:04 AM by David A. Mellis -
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  • You need to select ATmega168 from the Tools | Microcontroller menu of the Arduino environment.
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  • You need to select Arduino Mini from the Tools | Board menu of the Arduino environment.
June 15, 2007, at 11:52 PM by David A. Mellis -
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The Arduino Mini has a more powerful chip than the regular Arduino board (an ATmega168 instead of an ATmega8), meaning:

  • Your sketches can be twice as big (14 KB instead of 7 KB).

  • There are three extra PWM outputs (on pins 3, 5, and 6) in addition to the three on regular Arduino boards (pins 9, 10, and 11).

  • There are two extra analog inputs (8 total). Four of these, however, are not connected to the legs that come on the Arduino Mini, requiring you to solder wires to their holes to use them. Two of these unconnected pins are also used by the Wire library (I2C), meaning that its use will require soldering as well.

The Arduino Mini is more fragile and easy to break than a regular Arduino board.

to:

The microcontroller (an ATmega168) on the Arduino Mini is a physically smaller version of the chip on the USB Arduino boards, with the following small difference:

  • There are two extra analog inputs on the Mini (8 total). Four of these, however, are not connected to the legs that come on the Arduino Mini, requiring you to solder wires to their holes to use them. Two of these unconnected pins are also used by the Wire library (I2C), meaning that its use will require soldering as well.

Also, the Arduino Mini is more fragile and easy to break than a regular Arduino board.

June 15, 2007, at 10:07 PM by David A. Mellis -
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April 22, 2007, at 08:06 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Here's a diagram of the pin layout of the Arduino Mini:

January 07, 2007, at 02:01 PM by David A. Mellis -
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  • You can't remove the ATmega168, so if you kill it, you need a new Arduino Mini.
to:
  • You can't remove the ATmega168, so if you kill it, you need a new Mini.
January 07, 2007, at 02:00 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 5-6 from:
  • Connecting the Arduino Mini is a bit more complicated than a regular Arduino board (see below for instructions and photos).
to:
  • Connecting the Arduino Mini is a bit more complicated than a regular Arduino board (see below for instructions and photos).
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January 07, 2007, at 01:57 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Selecting ATmega168 in the Arduino Environment

To tell the Arduino environment that you're using an Arduino Mini, which has a different chip than the regular Arduino, you need to select ATmega168 from the Tools | Microcontroller menu.

January 07, 2007, at 01:53 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 11-24 from:
  • The Arduino Mini has a more powerful chip than the regular Arduino board (an ATmega168 instead of an ATmega8), meaning:

    • Your sketches can be twice as big (14 KB instead of 7 KB).

    • There are three extra PWM outputs (on pins 3, 5, and 6) in addition to the three on regular Arduino boards (pins 9, 10, and 11).

    • There are two extra analog inputs (8 total). Four of these, however, are not connected to the legs that come on the Arduino Mini, requiring you to solder wires to their holes to use them. Two of these unconnected pins are also used by the Wire library (I2C), meaning that its use will require soldering as well.

  • The Arduino Mini is more fragile and easy to break than a regular Arduino board.

    • Don't connect more than 9 volts to the +9V pin or reverse the power and ground pins of your power supply, or you might kill the ATmega168 on the Arduino Mini.

    • You can't remove the ATmega168, so if you kill it, you need a new Arduino Mini.
to:

The Arduino Mini has a more powerful chip than the regular Arduino board (an ATmega168 instead of an ATmega8), meaning:

  • Your sketches can be twice as big (14 KB instead of 7 KB).

  • There are three extra PWM outputs (on pins 3, 5, and 6) in addition to the three on regular Arduino boards (pins 9, 10, and 11).

  • There are two extra analog inputs (8 total). Four of these, however, are not connected to the legs that come on the Arduino Mini, requiring you to solder wires to their holes to use them. Two of these unconnected pins are also used by the Wire library (I2C), meaning that its use will require soldering as well.

The Arduino Mini is more fragile and easy to break than a regular Arduino board.

  • Don't connect more than 9 volts to the +9V pin or reverse the power and ground pins of your power supply, or you might kill the ATmega168 on the Arduino Mini.

  • You can't remove the ATmega168, so if you kill it, you need a new Arduino Mini.
January 07, 2007, at 01:53 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 19-24:
  • The Arduino Mini is more fragile and easy to break than a regular Arduino board.

    • Don't connect more than 9 volts to the +9V pin or reverse the power and ground pins of your power supply, or you might kill the ATmega168 on the Arduino Mini.

    • You can't remove the ATmega168, so if you kill it, you need a new Arduino Mini.
January 07, 2007, at 01:51 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 5-6 from:
  • Connecting the Arduino Mini is a bit more complicated than a regular Arduino board.
to:
  • Connecting the Arduino Mini is a bit more complicated than a regular Arduino board (see below for instructions and photos).
Changed lines 11-12 from:
  • The Arduino Mini has a more powerful chip than the regular Arduino board (an ATmega168 instead of an ATmega8), meaning that your sketches can be twice as big.
to:
  • The Arduino Mini has a more powerful chip than the regular Arduino board (an ATmega168 instead of an ATmega8), meaning:

    • Your sketches can be twice as big (14 KB instead of 7 KB).

    • There are three extra PWM outputs (on pins 3, 5, and 6) in addition to the three on regular Arduino boards (pins 9, 10, and 11).

    • There are two extra analog inputs (8 total). Four of these, however, are not connected to the legs that come on the Arduino Mini, requiring you to solder wires to their holes to use them. Two of these unconnected pins are also used by the Wire library (I2C), meaning that its use will require soldering as well.
January 07, 2007, at 01:41 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 7-10:
  • You need to select ATmega168 from the Tools | Microcontroller menu of the Arduino environment.

Information about the Arduino Mini

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  • However, you need to select ATmega168 from the Tools | Microcontroller menu of the Arduino environment.
January 07, 2007, at 01:36 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Connecting the Arduino Mini and a regular Arduino

Here's a photo of the Arduino Mini connected to an Arduino NG. The NG has its ATmega8 removed and is being used for its USB connection, power source, and reset button. Thus, you can reset the Arduino Mini just by pressing the button on the NG.

January 07, 2007, at 12:40 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 29-30 from:

Here is a photo showing the Arduino Mini connected to the Mini USB adapter. Notice that the reset pin is connected directly to +5V, without a pushbutton. Thus, to reset the Arduino Mini, you will need to unplug and reconnect the USB cable to the Mini USB Adapter, or manually move the orange wire connected to the reset pin from +5V to ground and back.

to:

Here is a photo showing the Arduino Mini connected to the Mini USB adapter. Notice that the reset pin is connected directly to +5V (the orange wire), without a pushbutton. Thus, to reset the Arduino Mini, you will need to unplug and reconnect the USB cable to the Mini USB Adapter, or manually move the orange wire connected to the reset pin from +5V to ground and back.

January 07, 2007, at 12:30 PM by David A. Mellis -
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  • An LED. While not technically necessary, connecting an LED to the Arduino Mini makes it easier to check if it's working. Pin 13 has a 1 KB resistor on it, so you can connect an LED to it directly without an external resistor.
to:
  • An LED. While not technically necessary, connecting an LED to the Arduino Mini makes it easier to check if it's working. Pin 13 has a 1 KB resistor on it, so you can connect an LED to it directly between it and ground. When using another pin, you will need an external resistor.
Added lines 29-30:

Here is a photo showing the Arduino Mini connected to the Mini USB adapter. Notice that the reset pin is connected directly to +5V, without a pushbutton. Thus, to reset the Arduino Mini, you will need to unplug and reconnect the USB cable to the Mini USB Adapter, or manually move the orange wire connected to the reset pin from +5V to ground and back.

January 07, 2007, at 12:25 PM by David A. Mellis -
January 07, 2007, at 12:13 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
  • You need to select ATmega168 from the Tools | Microcontroller menu of the Arduino environment.
to:
  • The Arduino Mini has a more powerful chip than the regular Arduino board (an ATmega168 instead of an ATmega8), meaning that your sketches can be twice as big.

  • However, you need to select ATmega168 from the Tools | Microcontroller menu of the Arduino environment.
January 07, 2007, at 12:11 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 3-4 from:

To get started with the Arduino Mini, follow the directions for the Arduino NG on your operating system (Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), with the following modifications.

to:

To get started with the Arduino Mini, follow the directions for the Arduino NG on your operating system (Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), with the following modifications:

  • Connecting the Arduino Mini is a bit more complicated than a regular Arduino board.

  • You need to select ATmega168 from the Tools | Microcontroller menu of the Arduino environment.
January 07, 2007, at 12:09 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 3-4 from:

To get the Arduino Mini, follow the directions for the Arduino NG on your operating system (Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), with the following modifications.

to:

To get started with the Arduino Mini, follow the directions for the Arduino NG on your operating system (Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), with the following modifications.

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  • Reset.
to:
  • Reset. Whenever this pin is connected to ground, the Arduino Mini resets. You can wire it to a pushbutton, or connect it to +5V to prevent the Arduino Mini from resetting (except when it loses power). If you leave the reset pin unconnected, the Arduino Mini will reset randomly.

  • An LED. While not technically necessary, connecting an LED to the Arduino Mini makes it easier to check if it's working. Pin 13 has a 1 KB resistor on it, so you can connect an LED to it directly without an external resistor.

You have a few options for connecting the board: the Mini USB Adapter, a regular Arduino board, or your own power supply and USB/Serial adapter.

Connecting the Arduino Mini and Mini USB Adapter

January 07, 2007, at 12:00 PM by David A. Mellis -
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To use the Arduino Mini, you need to connect:

  • Power. This can be a regulated +5V power source (e.g. from the +5V pin of the Mini USB Adapter or an Arduino NG) connected to the +5V pin of the Arduino Mini. Or, a +9V power source (e.g. a 9 volt battery) connected to the +9V pin of the Arduino Mini.

  • Ground. One of the ground pins on the Arduino Mini must be connected to ground of the power source.

  • TX/RX. These pins are used both for uploading new sketches to the board and communicating with a computer or other device.

  • Reset.
January 07, 2007, at 11:37 AM by David A. Mellis -
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January 07, 2007, at 11:36 AM by David A. Mellis -
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Connecting the Arduino Mini

January 07, 2007, at 11:35 AM by David A. Mellis -
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Guide to the Arduino Mini

To get the Arduino Mini, follow the directions for the Arduino NG on your operating system (Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), with the following modifications.

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