Guide.ArduinoWiFiShield History

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September 30, 2013, at 08:57 PM by Roberto Guido - merged with todo's corrections
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Connecting the Shield

to:

Connecting the Shield

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Using the Shield With Older Boards

to:

Using the Shield With Older Boards

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Ports on the WiFi Shield

to:

Ports on the WiFi Shield

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Network Settings

to:

Network Settings

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Scan for available networks

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Scan for available networks

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Open network example

to:

Open network example

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WPA network example

to:

WPA network example

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WEP Network example

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WEP Network example

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SD Card and SPI

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SD Card and SPI

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Updating firmware on the shield

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Updating firmware on the shield

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Next steps

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Next steps

March 11, 2013, at 12:57 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The WiFi Library is included with the most recent version of the Arduino IDE.

to:

The WiFi Library is included with the most recent version of the Arduino IDE. The firmware for the WiFi shield has changed in Arduino IDE 1.0.4. It is strongly recommended to install this update per these instructions

March 11, 2013, at 12:39 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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Updating firmware on the shield

Please follow this guide to update the firmware on your shield.

Next steps

Refer to the WiFi library page for more information on the functionality of the shield, as well as further examples.

December 19, 2012, at 07:30 PM by Alessandro Argenio -
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December 19, 2012, at 07:28 PM by Alessandro Argenio -
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December 19, 2012, at 07:02 PM by Alessandro Argenio -
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December 19, 2012, at 05:42 PM by Alessandro Argenio -
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\\
December 19, 2012, at 05:24 PM by Alessandro Argenio -
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December 19, 2012, at 05:19 PM by Alessandro Argenio -
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December 19, 2012, at 05:17 PM by Alessandro Argenio -
December 19, 2012, at 05:17 PM by Alessandro Argenio -
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November 26, 2012, at 12:47 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The WiFi Library is included with the most .

to:

The WiFi Library is included with the most recent version of the Arduino IDE.

November 26, 2012, at 12:20 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The WiFi Library is included with the most .

to:

The WiFi Library is included with the most .

November 26, 2012, at 12:20 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The WiFi Library is included with the most recent version of the Arduino IDE?.

to:

The WiFi Library is included with the most .

November 26, 2012, at 12:20 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The WiFi Library is included with the most recent version of the Arduino IDE?.

to:

The WiFi Library is included with the most recent version of the Arduino IDE?.

November 26, 2012, at 12:19 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The WiFi Library will be included in a future release of the Arduino IDE. You can download the most recent version, and install it as you would any other library.

to:

The WiFi Library is included with the most recent version of the Arduino IDE?.

October 09, 2012, at 04:17 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 21-22 from:

If you are using the WiFi shield with an Arduino earlier than the Uno rev3, you need to make the connection below for the board to work. The WiFi board uses the IOREF pin on newer Arduino pins (Uno rev3, Mega2560 rev3, and later) to sense the reference voltage for the I/O pins of the board to which it is attached. If you are using the shield with an older board, you need to connect the shield's IOREF pin to 3.3V. You can do this either with a jumper wire connecting IOREF to 3.3V as shown in the photo below, or by soldering the IOREF jumper on the bottom of the shield, shown below. WARNING: If you use the solder jumper, do not connect the shield to a rev3 or later board. To be safe, remove the IOREF pin on the shield. Otherwise, you will be shorting 3.3V to 5V through the IOREF pin.

to:

If you are using the WiFi shield with an Arduino earlier than the Uno rev3, you need to make the connection below for the board to work. The WiFi board uses the IOREF pin on newer Arduino pin layouts (Uno rev3, Mega2560 rev3, and later) to sense the reference voltage for the I/O pins of the board to which it is attached. If you are using the shield with an older board, you need to connect the shield's IOREF pin to 3.3V. You can do this either with a jumper wire connecting IOREF to 3.3V as shown in the photo below, or by soldering the IOREF jumper on the bottom of the shield, shown below. WARNING: If you use the solder jumper, do not connect the shield to a rev3 or later board. To be safe, remove the IOREF pin on the shield. Otherwise, you will be shorting 3.3V to 5V through the IOREF pin.

August 09, 2012, at 02:43 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The WiFi Library will be included in a future release of the Arduino IDE. You can download the most recent version Δ, and install it as you would any other library.

to:

The WiFi Library will be included in a future release of the Arduino IDE. You can download the most recent version, and install it as you would any other library.

August 08, 2012, at 02:43 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

The WiFi Library will be included in a future release of the Arduino IDE. You can download the most recent version?, and install it as you would any other library.

to:

The WiFi Library will be included in a future release of the Arduino IDE. You can download the most recent version Δ, and install it as you would any other library.

August 08, 2012, at 02:43 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

The WiFi Library will be included in a future release of the Arduino IDE. You can download the most recent version?, and install it as you would any other library.

to:

The WiFi Library will be included in a future release of the Arduino IDE. You can download the most recent version?, and install it as you would any other library.

August 08, 2012, at 02:42 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

The WiFi Library will be included in a future release of the Arduino IDE. You can download the most recent version, and install it as you would any other library.

to:

The WiFi Library will be included in a future release of the Arduino IDE. You can download the most recent version?, and install it as you would any other library.

August 07, 2012, at 05:37 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

The WiFi Library will be included in a future version of the Arduino IDE. You can download the most recent version, and install it as you would any other library.

to:

The WiFi Library will be included in a future release of the Arduino IDE. You can download the most recent version, and install it as you would any other library.

August 07, 2012, at 05:36 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The WiFi Library will be included in a future version of the Arduino IDE. You can download the most recent version, and install it as you would any other library.

August 02, 2012, at 10:41 AM by Federico -
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There is an onboard micro-USB connector. This is not for programming an attached Arduino, it is for updating the Atmega 32U using the Atmel DFU protocol. The programming jumper adjacent to the power bus and analog inputs should be left unconnected for typical use. It is only used for DFU programming mode.

A FTDI connection enables serial communication with the 32U for debugging purposes. A list of available commands can be found here.

to:

There is an onboard micro-USB connector. This is not for programming an attached Arduino, it is for updating the Atmega 32UC3 using the Atmel DFU protocol. The programming jumper adjacent to the power bus and analog inputs should be left unconnected for typical use. It is only used for DFU programming mode.

A FTDI connection enables serial communication with the 32UC3 for debugging purposes. A list of available commands can be found here.

July 31, 2012, at 08:25 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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\\
July 31, 2012, at 08:19 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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July 26, 2012, at 05:49 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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July 26, 2012, at 05:46 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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Digital pin 3 is used as a handshake pin between the WiFi shield and the Arduino, and should not be used.

to:

Digital pin 7 is used as a handshake pin between the WiFi shield and the Arduino, and should not be used.

May 19, 2012, at 04:17 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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\\

May 19, 2012, at 04:16 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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Arduino communicates with the shield using the SPI bus. This is on digital pins 11, 12, and 13 on the Uno and pins 50, 51, and 52 on the Mega. On both boards, pin 10 is used as SS. On the Mega, the hardware SS pin, 53, is not used, but it must be kept as an output or the SPI interface won't work.

to:

Arduino communicates with the shield using the SPI bus. This is on digital pins 11, 12, and 13 on the Uno and pins 50, 51, and 52 on the Mega. On both boards, pin 10 is used as SS. On the Mega, the hardware SS pin, 53, is not used, but it must be kept as an output or the SPI interface won't work. \\

April 27, 2012, at 01:25 PM by Tom Igoe -
April 24, 2012, at 04:27 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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1 | Connecting the Shield

to:

Connecting the Shield

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2 | Using the Shield With Older Boards

to:

Using the Shield With Older Boards

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3 | Ports on the WiFi Shield

to:

Ports on the WiFi Shield

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4 | Network Settings

to:

Network Settings

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5 | Scan for available networks

to:

Scan for available networks

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6 | Open network example

to:

Open network example

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7 | WPA network example

to:

WPA network example

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8 | WEP Network example

to:

WEP Network example

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9 | SD Card and SPI

to:

SD Card and SPI

April 24, 2012, at 03:42 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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1|!!!!Connecting the Shield

to:

1 | Connecting the Shield

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2|!!!!Using the Shield With Older Boards

to:

2 | Using the Shield With Older Boards

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3|!!!!Ports on the WiFi Shield

to:

3 | Ports on the WiFi Shield

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4|!!!!Network Settings

to:

4 | Network Settings

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5|!!!!Scan for available networks

to:

5 | Scan for available networks

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6|!!!!Open network example

to:

6 | Open network example

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7|!!!!WPA network example

to:

7 | WPA network example

Changed line 187 from:

8|!!!!WEP Network example

to:

8 | WEP Network example

Changed lines 232-233 from:

9|!!!!SD Card and SPI

to:

9 | SD Card and SPI

April 24, 2012, at 03:40 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 7-8 from:

Connecting the Shield

to:
Changed lines 17-18 from:

Using the Shield With Older Boards

to:

2|!!!!Using the Shield With Older Boards

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Ports on the WiFi Shield

to:

3|!!!!Ports on the WiFi Shield

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Network Settings

to:

4|!!!!Network Settings

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Scan for available networks

to:

5|!!!!Scan for available networks

Changed line 119 from:

Open network example

to:

6|!!!!Open network example

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WPA network example

to:

7|!!!!WPA network example

Changed line 187 from:

WEP Network example

to:

8|!!!!WEP Network example

Changed lines 232-233 from:

SD Card and SPI

to:

9|!!!!SD Card and SPI

April 24, 2012, at 03:38 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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There is an onboard micro-USB connector. This is not for programming an attached Arduino, it is for updating the Atmega 32U using the Atmel DFU protocol.

to:

Attach:WiFiAdditionalPorts.jpg Δ
There is an onboard micro-USB connector. This is not for programming an attached Arduino, it is for updating the Atmega 32U using the Atmel DFU protocol. The programming jumper adjacent to the power bus and analog inputs should be left unconnected for typical use. It is only used for DFU programming mode.

April 24, 2012, at 04:35 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The WiFI library is similar to the Ethernet library.

to:

The WiFI library is similar to the Ethernet library and many of the function calls are the same.

April 24, 2012, at 04:33 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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to:
April 23, 2012, at 10:25 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 15-16 from:

If you are using the WiFi shield with an Arduino earlier than the Uno rev3, you need to make the connection below for the board to work. The Wifi board uses the IOREF pin on newer Arduino pins (Uno rev3, Mega2560 rev3, and later) to sense the reference voltage for the I/O pins of the board to which it is attached. If you are using the shield with an older board, you need to connect the shield's IOREF pin to 3.3V. You can do this either with a jumper wire connecting IOREF to 3.3V as shown in the photo below, or by soldering the IOREF jumper on the bottom of the shield, shown below. WARNING: If you use the solder jumper, do not connect the shield to a rev3 or later board. To be safe, remove the IOREF pin on the shield. Otherwise, you will be shorting 3.3V to 5V through the IOREF pin.

to:

Using the Shield With Older Boards

If you are using the WiFi shield with an Arduino earlier than the Uno rev3, you need to make the connection below for the board to work. The WiFi board uses the IOREF pin on newer Arduino pins (Uno rev3, Mega2560 rev3, and later) to sense the reference voltage for the I/O pins of the board to which it is attached. If you are using the shield with an older board, you need to connect the shield's IOREF pin to 3.3V. You can do this either with a jumper wire connecting IOREF to 3.3V as shown in the photo below, or by soldering the IOREF jumper on the bottom of the shield, shown below. WARNING: If you use the solder jumper, do not connect the shield to a rev3 or later board. To be safe, remove the IOREF pin on the shield. Otherwise, you will be shorting 3.3V to 5V through the IOREF pin.

April 23, 2012, at 10:23 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
April 23, 2012, at 10:23 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Added lines 15-22:

If you are using the WiFi shield with an Arduino earlier than the Uno rev3, you need to make the connection below for the board to work. The Wifi board uses the IOREF pin on newer Arduino pins (Uno rev3, Mega2560 rev3, and later) to sense the reference voltage for the I/O pins of the board to which it is attached. If you are using the shield with an older board, you need to connect the shield's IOREF pin to 3.3V. You can do this either with a jumper wire connecting IOREF to 3.3V as shown in the photo below, or by soldering the IOREF jumper on the bottom of the shield, shown below. WARNING: If you use the solder jumper, do not connect the shield to a rev3 or later board. To be safe, remove the IOREF pin on the shield. Otherwise, you will be shorting 3.3V to 5V through the IOREF pin.

Jumping 3.3V to IOREF (recommended)

Soldering 3.3V to IOREF

April 23, 2012, at 07:48 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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Digital pin 3 is used as a handshake pin between the WiFi shield and the Arduino, and should not be used.

April 21, 2012, at 12:42 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Added lines 13-17:

Ports on the WiFi Shield

There is an onboard micro-USB connector. This is not for programming an attached Arduino, it is for updating the Atmega 32U using the Atmel DFU protocol.

A FTDI connection enables serial communication with the 32U for debugging purposes. A list of available commands can be found here.

April 18, 2012, at 05:48 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 25-26 from:

The sketch below is a good one to run the first time you use the board in a new place. It will give you an idea of how the shield works, and what networks it can see. This sketch will not connect to a network, but it will show you what networks the shield can view. Your WiFi shield will probably not see as many networks as a computer with a larger WiFi antenna.

to:

The sketch below is a good one to run the first time you use the board in a new area. This sketch will not connect to a network, but it will show you what networks the shield can view. Your WiFi shield will probably not see as many networks as a computer with a larger WiFi antenna. Once you have downloaded the sketch to your Arduino, open the serial port to see available networks.

April 18, 2012, at 05:46 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 25-29 from:

The sketch below is a good one to run the first time you use the board in a new place. It will give you a god idea of what the

Open network example

The sketch below shows you how to initiate a connection with an open network named "yourNetwork".

to:

The sketch below is a good one to run the first time you use the board in a new place. It will give you an idea of how the shield works, and what networks it can see. This sketch will not connect to a network, but it will show you what networks the shield can view. Your WiFi shield will probably not see as many networks as a computer with a larger WiFi antenna.

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  1. include <SPI.h>
Deleted lines 30-32:

char ssid[] = "yourNetwork"; // the name of your network int status = WL_IDLE_STATUS; // the Wifi radio's status

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  // initialize serial:
to:
  // initialize serial and wait for the port to open:
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  // attempt to connect to an open network:
  Serial.println("Attempting to connect to open network...");
  status = WiFi.begin(ssid);

  // if you're not connected, stop here:
  if ( status != WL_CONNECTED) { 
    Serial.println("Couldn't get a wifi connection");
    while(true);
  } 
  // if you are connected :
  else {
      Serial.print("Connected to the network");
  }
to:
  while(!Serial) ;

  // attempt to connect using WEP encryption:
  Serial.println("Initializing Wifi...");
  printMacAddress();

  // scan for existing networks:
  Serial.println("Scanning available networks...");
  listNetworks();
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  // do nothing
to:
  delay(10000);
  // scan for existing networks:
  Serial.println("Scanning available networks...");
  listNetworks();
Added lines 51-96:

void printMacAddress() {

  // the MAC address of your Wifi shield
  byte mac[6];                     

  // print your MAC address:
  WiFi.macAddress(mac);
  Serial.print("MAC: ");
  Serial.print(mac[5],HEX);
  Serial.print(":");
  Serial.print(mac[4],HEX);
  Serial.print(":");
  Serial.print(mac[3],HEX);
  Serial.print(":");
  Serial.print(mac[2],HEX);
  Serial.print(":");
  Serial.print(mac[1],HEX);
  Serial.print(":");
  Serial.println(mac[0],HEX);

}

void listNetworks() {

  // scan for nearby networks:
  Serial.println("** Scan Networks **");
  byte numSsid = WiFi.scanNetworks();

  // print the list of networks seen:
  Serial.print("number of available networks:");
  Serial.println(numSsid);

  // print the network number and name for each network found:
  for (int thisNet = 0; thisNet<numSsid; thisNet++) {
    Serial.print(thisNet);
    Serial.print(") ");
    Serial.print(WiFi.SSID(thisNet));
    Serial.print("\tSignal: ");
    Serial.print(WiFi.RSSI(thisNet));
    Serial.print(" dBm");
    Serial.print("\tEncryption: ");
    Serial.println(WiFi.encryptionType(thisNet));
  }

}

Changed lines 99-101 from:

WPA network example

The example below shows how to connect to a WPA/WPA2 Personal encrypted network named "yourNetwork" with a password "12345678".

to:

Open network example

The sketch below shows you how to initiate a connection with an open network named "yourNetwork".

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char ssid[] = "yourNetwork"; // your network SSID (name) char pass[] = "12345678"; // your network password

to:

char ssid[] = "yourNetwork"; // the name of your network

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  // attempt to connect using WPA2 encryption:
  Serial.println("Attempting to connect to WPA network...");
  status = WiFi.begin(ssid, pass);
to:
  // attempt to connect to an open network:
  Serial.println("Attempting to connect to open network...");
  status = WiFi.begin(ssid);
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  // if you are connected, print out info about the connection:
to:
  // if you are connected :
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    Serial.println("Connected to network");
to:
      Serial.print("Connected to the network");
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to:
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char key[] = "ABBADEAF01"; // your network key int keyIndex = 0; //your network key Index number

to:

char pass[] = "12345678"; // your network password

Changed lines 146-149 from:
  // attempt to connect using WEP encryption:
  Serial.println("Attempting to connect to WEP network...");
  status = WiFi.begin(ssid, keyIndex, key);
to:
  // attempt to connect using WPA2 encryption:
  Serial.println("Attempting to connect to WPA network...");
  status = WiFi.begin(ssid, pass);
Added line 164:
Added lines 167-211:
April 13, 2012, at 12:36 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 3-4 from:

The Arduino WiFi shield? allows an Arduino board to connect to the internet using the WiFi library and to read and write an SD card using the SD library.

to:

The Arduino WiFi shield allows an Arduino board to connect to the internet using the WiFi library and to read and write an SD card using the SD library.

April 11, 2012, at 05:03 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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Scan for available networks

The sketch below is a good one to run the first time you use the board in a new place. It will give you a god idea of what the

March 05, 2012, at 03:15 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The shield will connect to open networks, as well as those using WEP and WPA2 encryption. WPA2 Enterprise encryption is not supported. The SSID (network name) must be broadcast for the shield to connect.

to:

The shield will connect to open networks, as well as those using WEP and WPA2 Personal encryption. The shield will not connect to networks using WPA2 Enterprise encryption.

The SSID (network name) must be broadcast for the shield to connect.

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  • For networks using WPA encryption, you need the SSID and password.
to:
  • For networks using WPA/WPA2 Personal encryption, you need the SSID and password.
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The example below shows how to connect to a WPA encrypted network named "yourNetwork" with a password "12345678".

to:

The example below shows how to connect to a WPA/WPA2 Personal encrypted network named "yourNetwork" with a password "12345678".

Changed lines 99-100 from:

Each key is 10 or 26 hexadecimal digits long (40 or 128 bits) and paired with a key number.

to:

Each key is 10 or 26 hexadecimal digits long (40 or 128 bits) and paired with a key number. For example, a 40-bit key, ABBADEAF01 will work, but ABBADEAF won't work (too short) and ABBAISDEAF won't work (I and S are not hexadecimal characters).vFor 128-bit, you need a string that is 26 characters long. D0D0DEADF00DABBADEAFBEADED will work because it's 26 characters, all in the 0-9, A-F range.

Changed lines 103-104 from:

The example below shows how to connect to a WEP encrypted network named "yourNetwork" with a hex key of "725d223132", and a key index of 0.

to:

The example below shows how to connect to a WEP encrypted network named "yourNetwork" with a hex key of "ABBADEAF01", and a key index of 0.

Changed line 109 from:

char key[] = "725d223132"; // your network key

to:

char key[] = "ABBADEAF01"; // your network key

March 04, 2012, at 11:26 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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to:
March 04, 2012, at 11:25 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed line 10 from:
to:
March 02, 2012, at 07:40 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Deleted lines 90-91:

The example below shows how to connect to a WEP encrypted network named "yourNetwork" with a hex key of "725d223132", and a key index of 0.

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If you do not have access to your router's administrative tools, consult your network administrator.

Added lines 101-102:

The example below shows how to connect to a WEP encrypted network named "yourNetwork" with a hex key of "725d223132", and a key index of 0.

March 02, 2012, at 06:47 PM by Scott Fitzgerald - added images and additional WEP information
Changed lines 9-10 from:

To use the shield, mount it on top of an Arduino board (e.g. the Uno). To upload sketches to the board, connect it to your computer with a USB cable as you normally would. Once the sketch has been uploaded, you can disconnect the board from your computer and power it with an external power supply.

to:

Attach:ArduinoWiFiShieldDescribed.jpg Δ

To use the shield, mount it on top of an Arduino board (e.g. the Uno). To upload sketches to the board, connect it to your computer with a USB cable as you normally would. Once the sketch has been uploaded, you can disconnect the board from your computer and power it with an external power supply.

Added lines 91-100:

The example below shows how to connect to a WEP encrypted network named "yourNetwork" with a hex key of "725d223132", and a key index of 0.

Your router will most likely have a settings dialog similar to the one below for generating the WEP key based on an ASCII passphrase:

Each key is 10 or 26 hexadecimal digits long (40 or 128 bits) and paired with a key number.

NB : WEP provides a basic encryption mechanism, but it can be cracked. If you require strong encryption for your network, it is recommended you use WPA

Changed line 104 from:

char ssid[] = "Borchetta"; // your network SSID (name)

to:

char ssid[] = "yourNetwork"; // your network SSID (name)

March 01, 2012, at 05:04 PM by Scott Fitzgerald - added information about what is needed for each network type
Added lines 5-6:

The WiFI library is similar to the Ethernet library.

Changed lines 13-16 from:

The shield will connect to open networks, as well as those using WEP and WPA2 encryption. WPA2 Enterprise encryption is not supported. The network name must be broadcast for the shield to connect.

The WiFI library is similar to the Ethernet library.

to:
Changed lines 125-127 from:

Arduino communicates with the shield using the SPI bus. This is on digital pins 11, 12, and 13 on the Uno and pins 50, 51, and 52 on the Mega. On both boards, pin 10 is used as SS. On the Mega, the hardware SS pin, 53, is not used, but it must be kept as an output or the SPI interface won't work.

to:

Arduino communicates with the shield using the SPI bus. This is on digital pins 11, 12, and 13 on the Uno and pins 50, 51, and 52 on the Mega. On both boards, pin 10 is used as SS. On the Mega, the hardware SS pin, 53, is not used, but it must be kept as an output or the SPI interface won't work.

March 01, 2012, at 03:28 PM by Federico -
Changed lines 3-4 from:

The Arduino WiFi shield? allows an Arduino board to connect to the internet using the WiFi library? and to read and write an SD card using the SD library.

to:

The Arduino WiFi shield? allows an Arduino board to connect to the internet using the WiFi library and to read and write an SD card using the SD library.

February 28, 2012, at 10:59 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 3-4 from:

The Arduino WiFi shield? allows an Arduino board to connect to the internet using the WiFI library? and to read and write an SD card using the SD library.

to:

The Arduino WiFi shield? allows an Arduino board to connect to the internet using the WiFi library? and to read and write an SD card using the SD library.

Changed lines 13-14 from:

The WiFI library? is similar to the Ethernet library.

to:

The WiFI library is similar to the Ethernet library.

February 28, 2012, at 10:59 PM by Scott Fitzgerald - page creation
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Arduino WiFI Shield

The Arduino WiFi shield? allows an Arduino board to connect to the internet using the WiFI library? and to read and write an SD card using the SD library.

Connecting the Shield

To use the shield, mount it on top of an Arduino board (e.g. the Uno). To upload sketches to the board, connect it to your computer with a USB cable as you normally would. Once the sketch has been uploaded, you can disconnect the board from your computer and power it with an external power supply.

Network Settings

The shield will connect to open networks, as well as those using WEP and WPA2 encryption. WPA2 Enterprise encryption is not supported. The network name must be broadcast for the shield to connect.

The WiFI library? is similar to the Ethernet library.

SD Card and SPI

The WiFI Shield includes a micro-SD card slot, which can be interfaced with using the SD library. The SS for the SD card is pin 4.

Arduino communicates with the shield using the SPI bus. This is on digital pins 11, 12, and 13 on the Uno and pins 50, 51, and 52 on the Mega. On both boards, pin 10 is used as SS. On the Mega, the hardware SS pin, 53, is not used, but it must be kept as an output or the SPI interface won't work.

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