Guide.HomePage History

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September 30, 2013, at 08:59 PM by Roberto Guido - merged with todo's corrections
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July 08, 2013, at 07:45 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoYun | Arduino Yún]]
May 15, 2013, at 01:04 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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*[[Guide/Robot | Arduino Robot]]
May 13, 2013, at 10:46 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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*[[Guide/TFT | TFT LCD Screen]]
February 04, 2013, at 12:59 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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December 07, 2012, at 08:48 PM by David A. Mellis -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoEsplora | Arduino Esplora]]
December 07, 2012, at 08:47 PM by David A. Mellis -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoEsplora | Arduino Esplora]]
December 06, 2012, at 11:38 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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December 05, 2012, at 04:47 PM by Federico -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoEsplora | Arduino Esplora]]
December 01, 2012, at 02:42 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
December 01, 2012, at 02:26 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoGSMShield | GSM shield]]
November 09, 2012, at 10:48 PM by David A. Mellis -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoLilyPadUSB | LilyPad Arduino USB]]
October 31, 2012, at 08:58 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoLeonardo | Arduino Leonardo]]
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*[[Guide/ArduinoLeonardoMicro | Arduino Leonardo and Micro]]
September 24, 2012, at 06:46 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoDue | Arduino Due]]
September 24, 2012, at 12:50 AM by David A. Mellis -
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[[Guide/Libraries | Libraries]]: Using and installing Arduino libraries.
July 30, 2012, at 05:02 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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June 02, 2012, at 08:13 PM by David A. Mellis -
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!!Getting Started with Arduino Uno
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!!Getting Started with Arduino
May 18, 2012, at 11:26 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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April 13, 2012, at 12:36 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoEthernetShield | Ethernet shield]]
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*[[Guide/ArduinoEthernetShield | Ethernet shield]]
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*[[Guide/ArduinoWiFiShield | WiFi shield]]
April 10, 2012, at 08:31 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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[[Guide/Environment | Environment]]: Description of the Arduino development environment.
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[[Guide/Environment | Environment]]: Description of the Arduino development environment and how to change the default language.
April 04, 2012, at 12:26 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoNano | Arduino Nano]]
*[[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]]
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*[[Guide/ArduinoLilyPad | LilyPad Arduino]]
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*[[Guide/ArduinoLeonardo | Arduino Leonardo]]
*[[Guide/ArduinoLilyPad | LilyPad Arduino]]
*[[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]]
*[[Guide/ArduinoNano | Arduino Nano]]
March 05, 2012, at 12:38 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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!!Getting Started with Arduino
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!!Getting Started with Arduino Uno
February 04, 2012, at 07:45 PM by Scott Fitzgerald - removing leonardo link, updating xbee reference to wireless page
February 04, 2012, at 07:44 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoLeonardo | Arduino Leonardo]]
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*[[Guide/ArduinoXbeeShield | Xbee shield]]
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*[[Guide/ArduinoWirelessShield | Wireless shield]]
December 07, 2011, at 06:37 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoLeonardo | Arduino Leonardo]]
September 29, 2010, at 10:57 PM by David Cuartielles -
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Installation: Step-by-step instructions for setting up the Arduino software and connecting it to an Arduino Uno, Duemilanove, or Diecimila.
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Installation: Step-by-step instructions for setting up the Arduino software and connecting it to an Arduino Uno, Mega2560, Duemilanove, Mega, or Diecimila.
September 29, 2010, at 10:44 PM by David Cuartielles -
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Installation: Step-by-step instructions for setting up the Arduino software and connecting it to an Arduino Duemilanove.
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Installation: Step-by-step instructions for setting up the Arduino software and connecting it to an Arduino Uno, Duemilanove, or Diecimila.
September 29, 2010, at 09:12 PM by Tom Igoe -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoUno | Arduino Uno]]
September 29, 2010, at 09:12 PM by Tom Igoe -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoUno | Arduino Uno]]
September 29, 2010, at 12:43 PM by Tom Igoe -
March 31, 2010, at 06:13 PM by David A. Mellis -
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*[[Main/ArduinoBoardFioProgramming | Arduino Fio]]
February 06, 2010, at 01:24 AM by David A. Mellis -
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February 06, 2010, at 01:23 AM by David A. Mellis -
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*[[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]] (community-created content)
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*[[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]] (on the playground wiki)
February 06, 2010, at 01:23 AM by David A. Mellis -
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*[[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]
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*[[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]] (community-created content)
November 29, 2009, at 02:00 AM by David A. Mellis -
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(:title Getting started with Arduino:)
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(:title Getting Started:)
November 29, 2009, at 01:59 AM by David A. Mellis -
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!!Guide to Getting Started with Arduino
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!!Getting Started with Arduino
November 29, 2009, at 01:59 AM by David A. Mellis -
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!!!Installation

Step-by-step instructions for setting up the Arduino software and connecting it to an Arduino Duemilanove.
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(:cell width=50%:)

[[Guide/Introduction | Introduction]]: What Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.

Installation: Step-by-step instructions for setting up the Arduino software and connecting it to an Arduino Duemilanove.
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!!!Hardware

Instructions for other boards.
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[[Guide/Environment | Environment]]: Description of the Arduino development environment.

[[Guide/Troubleshooting]]: Advice on what to do if things don't work.

(:cell width=50%:)

Instructions for other boards:
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(:cell width=33%:)

!!!General

[[Guide/Introduction | Introduction]]: What Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.

[[Guide/Troubleshooting]]: Advice on what to do if things don't work.

[[Guide/Environment | Environment]]: Description of the Arduino development environment.
May 17, 2009, at 10:09 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Step-by-step instructions for setting up the Arduino software and connecting it to an Arduino Diecimila.
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Step-by-step instructions for setting up the Arduino software and connecting it to an Arduino Duemilanove.
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Specific instructions for particular boards.
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Instructions for other boards.
November 01, 2008, at 05:30 PM by David A. Mellis -
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*[[Guide/ArduinoEthernetShield | Ethernet shield]]
October 11, 2008, at 11:42 PM by David A. Mellis -
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!!!General

[[Guide/Introduction | Introduction]]: What Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.

[[Guide/Troubleshooting]]: Advice on what to do if things don't work.

[[Guide/Environment | Environment]]: Description of the Arduino development environment.


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(:cell width=33%:)

!!!General

[[Guide/Introduction | Introduction]]: What Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.

[[Guide/Troubleshooting]]: Advice on what to do if things don't work.

[[Guide/Environment | Environment]]: Description of the Arduino development environment.
October 11, 2008, at 11:41 PM by David A. Mellis - simplifying dramatically
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[+You just got your Arduino in the mail and now you're ready to start having fun with Physical Computing? Here is the best place to start, with tutorials and guides to help you get started with Arduino hardware and software! From how to turn it on and plug it in to installing the driver and uploading your very first sketch program. These getting started guides are required reading for all new users!+]
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!!!In This Quick-Start Guide...

This guide tell you everything you need to get started with Arduino and how to configure your setup so you can upload your first sketch. It consists of the following pages:

* [[Guide/Introduction | Introduction]]: Read this introduction for an explanation of what Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.

* '''Step-by-step instructions for how to get set up with your Arduino hardware and software. This is the most important part of the getting started guide!''' Click whichever link matches your computer set-up:
**[[Guide/Windows | Windows]]
**[[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]]
**[[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]

* If you're using one of the following Arduino variants or shields, they have their own introductory guides as well:
**[[Guide/ArduinoNano | Arduino Nano]]
**[[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]]
**[[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]]
**[[Guide/ArduinoLilyPad | LilyPad Arduino]]
**[[Guide/ArduinoPro | Arduino Pro]]
**[[Guide/ArduinoProMini | Arduino Pro Mini]]

**[[Guide/ArduinoXbeeShield | Xbee shield]]

* [[Guide/Troubleshooting]]: HELP!!! Having problems? Read the troubleshooting guide for advice on what to do if things don't work.

* [[Guide/Environment | Sofware environment]]: A more detailed description of the Arduino software (development environment) and its parts.


(:cell width=50%:)

!!!Other guides on the Arduino website

* [[Booklet/HomePage | Arduino booklet]]: an fun introduction to physical computing, electronics, and Arduino. Printable PDF with hand-drawn illustrations.


!!! More detailed guides, from our friends

* [[http://www.ladyada.net/learn/arduino/index.html | Learn electronics using Arduino]]: a great multi-part tutorial with tons of pictures, code, circuits, even video. Highly recommended.

* [[http://todbot.com/blog/spookyarduino/ | TodBot's course guides]] Longer presentation-format documents introducing Arduino from a Halloween hacking class taught by TodBot: [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class1.pdf | class 1 (getting started)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class2.pdf | class 2 (input and sensors)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class3.pdf | class 3 (communication, servos, and pwm)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class4.pdf | class 4 (piezo sound & sensors, arduino+processing, stand-alone operation)]].

* [[http://wiring.org.co/reference/electronics/index.html | Wiring electronics reference]]: circuit diagrams for connecting a variety of basic electronic components.

* [[http://wiring.org.co/learning/tutorials/diagrams.html | Schematics to circuits]]: from Wiring, a guide to transforming circuit diagrams into physical circuits.

* [[http://tigoe.net/pcomp/ | Tom Igoe's Physical Computing Site]]: lots of information on electronics, microcontrollers, sensors, actuators, books, etc.
to:
(:cell width=33%:)

!!!General

[[Guide/Introduction | Introduction]]: What Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.

[[Guide/Troubleshooting]]: Advice on what to do if things don't work.

[[Guide/Environment | Environment]]: Description of the Arduino development environment.


(:cell width=33%:)

!!!Installation

Step-by-step instructions for setting up the Arduino software and connecting it to an Arduino Diecimila.

*[[Guide/Windows | Windows]]
*[[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]]
*[[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]

(:cell width=33%:)

!!!Hardware

Specific instructions for particular boards.

*[[Guide/ArduinoNano | Arduino Nano]]
*[[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]]
*[[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]]
*[[Guide/ArduinoLilyPad | LilyPad Arduino]]
*[[Guide/ArduinoPro | Arduino Pro]]
*[[Guide/ArduinoProMini | Arduino Pro Mini]]

*[[Guide/ArduinoXbeeShield | Xbee shield]]
August 23, 2008, at 08:21 PM by David A. Mellis -
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**[[Guide/ArduinoProMini | Arduino Pro Mini]]
August 23, 2008, at 01:12 AM by David A. Mellis -
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**[[Guide/ArduinoPro | Arduino Pro]]
June 18, 2008, at 04:37 PM by David A. Mellis -
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**[[Guide/ArduinoNano | Arduino Nano]]
April 24, 2008, at 05:28 AM by David A. Mellis -
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February 14, 2008, at 04:20 AM by David A. Mellis -
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* [[Guide/Board | Hardware board]]: A more detailed description of the Arduino hardware board and its parts.
November 08, 2007, at 08:05 PM by Limor Fried -
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[+You just got your Arduino in the mail and now you're ready to start having fun with Physical Computing? Here is the best place to start, with tutorials and guides to help you get started with Arduino! From how to turn it on and plug it in to installing the driver and uploading your very first sketch program. These getting started guides are required reading for all new Arduino users!+]
to:
[+You just got your Arduino in the mail and now you're ready to start having fun with Physical Computing? Here is the best place to start, with tutorials and guides to help you get started with Arduino hardware and software! From how to turn it on and plug it in to installing the driver and uploading your very first sketch program. These getting started guides are required reading for all new users!+]
November 08, 2007, at 08:01 PM by Limor Fried - font noodling
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[+You just got your Arduino in the mail and now you're ready to start having fun with Physical Computing? Here is the best place to start, with tutorials and guides to help you get started with Arduino! From how to turn it on and plug it in to installing the driver and uploading your very first sketch program. These getting started guides are required reading for all new Arduino users!+]
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* How to get set up using the following operating systems
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* '''Step-by-step instructions for how to get set up with your Arduino hardware and software. This is the most important part of the getting started guide!''' Click whichever link matches your computer set-up:
November 08, 2007, at 07:52 PM by Limor Fried -
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!!! More Getting Started guides, from our friends
to:
!!! More detailed guides, from our friends
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* [[http://todbot.com/blog/spookyarduino/ | Course guides]]: Longer documents introducing Arduino: [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class1.pdf | class 1 (getting started)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class2.pdf | class 2 (input and sensors)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class3.pdf | class 3 (communication, servos, and pwm)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class4.pdf | class 4 (piezo sound & sensors, arduino+processing, stand-alone operation)]].
to:
* [[http://todbot.com/blog/spookyarduino/ | TodBot's course guides]] Longer presentation-format documents introducing Arduino from a Halloween hacking class taught by TodBot: [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class1.pdf | class 1 (getting started)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class2.pdf | class 2 (input and sensors)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class3.pdf | class 3 (communication, servos, and pwm)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class4.pdf | class 4 (piezo sound & sensors, arduino+processing, stand-alone operation)]].
November 08, 2007, at 07:49 PM by Limor Fried - rearranging, reformatting, etc
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* [[Guide/Introduction | Introduction]]: an explanation of what Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.

* How To get set up using the following operating systems
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* [[Guide/Introduction | Introduction]]: Read this introduction for an explanation of what Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.

* How to get set up using the following operating systems
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* [[Guide/Board]]: A more detailed description of the Arduino hardware board and its parts.

* [[Guide/Environment]]: A more detailed description of the Arduino development environment and its parts.

!!!Elsewhere on the Arduino website

* [[Booklet/HomePage | Arduino booklet]]: an introduction to physical computing, electronics, and Arduino.
to:
* [[Guide/Board | Hardware board]]: A more detailed description of the Arduino hardware board and its parts.

* [[Guide/Environment | Sofware environment]]: A more detailed description of the Arduino software (development environment) and its parts.

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!!!External Resources
to:
!!!Other guides on the Arduino website

* [[Booklet/HomePage | Arduino booklet]]: an fun introduction to physical computing, electronics, and Arduino. Printable PDF with hand-drawn illustrations.


!!! More Getting Started guides, from our friends
November 08, 2007, at 07:43 PM by Limor Fried - reformatting
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(:title Guide:)
!!Guide to Arduino
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(:title Getting started with Arduino:)
!!Guide to Getting Started with Arduino
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!!!In This Guide

This guide tell you everything you need to get started with Arduino. It consists of the following pages:
to:
!!!In This Quick-Start Guide...

This guide tell you everything you need to get started with Arduino and how to configure your setup so you can upload your first sketch. It consists of the following pages:
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* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]], [[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]], [[Guide/ArduinoLilyPad | LilyPad Arduino]]; [[Guide/ArduinoXbeeShield | Xbee shield]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working.
* [[Guide/Troubleshooting]]: what to do if things don't work.
* [[Guide/Board]]: description of the Arduino board and its parts.
* [[Guide/Environment]]: description of the Arduino development environment and its parts.
to:

* How To get set up using the following operating systems
**[[Guide/Windows | Windows]]
**[[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]]
**[[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]

* If you're using one of the following Arduino variants or shields, they have their own introductory guides as well:
**[[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]]
**[[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]]
**[[Guide/ArduinoLilyPad | LilyPad Arduino]]
**[[Guide/ArduinoXbeeShield | Xbee shield]]

* [[Guide/Troubleshooting]]: HELP!!! Having problems? Read the troubleshooting guide for advice on what to do if things don't work.

* [[Guide/Board]]: A more detailed description of the Arduino hardware board and its parts.

* [[Guide/Environment]]: A more detailed description of the Arduino development environment and its parts.
November 02, 2007, at 05:37 AM by David A. Mellis - adding ladyada's arduino tutorial.
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* [[http://www.ladyada.net/learn/arduino/index.html | Learn electronics using Arduino]]: a great multi-part tutorial with tons of pictures, code, circuits, even video. Highly recommended.
October 04, 2007, at 03:53 PM by David A. Mellis - adding link to lilypad guide
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* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]], [[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]]; [[Guide/ArduinoXbeeShield | Xbee shield]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working.
to:
* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]], [[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]], [[Guide/ArduinoLilyPad | LilyPad Arduino]]; [[Guide/ArduinoXbeeShield | Xbee shield]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working.
September 01, 2007, at 06:04 AM by David A. Mellis -
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* [[Guide/Guide | Introduction]] (this page): an explanation of what Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.
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* [[Guide/Introduction | Introduction]]: an explanation of what Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.
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(:tableend:)

!!!What is Arduino?

Arduino is a tool for making computers that can sense and control more of the physical world than your desktop computer. It's an open-source physical computing platform based on a simple microcontroller board, and a development environment for writing software for the board.

Arduino can be used to develop interactive objects, taking inputs from a variety of switches or sensors, and controlling a variety of lights, motors, and other physical outputs. Arduino projects can be stand-alone, or they can be communicate with software running on your computer (e.g. Flash, Processing, MaxMSP.) The boards can be assembled by hand or purchased preassembled; the open-source IDE can be downloaded for free.

The Arduino programming language is an implementation of Wiring, a similar physical computing platform, which is based on the Processing multimedia programming environment.

!!!Why Arduino?

There are many other microcontrollers and microcontroller platforms available for physical computing. Parallax Basic Stamp, Netmedia's BX-24, Phidgets, MIT's Handyboard, and many others offer similar functionality. All of these tools take the messy details of microcontroller programming and wrap it up in an easy-to-use package. Arduino also simplifies the process of working with microcontrollers, but it offers some advantage for teachers, students, and interested amateurs over other systems:

* Inexpensive - Arduino boards are relatively inexpensive compared to other microcontroller platforms. The least expensive version of the Arduino module can be assembled by hand, and even the pre-assembled Arduino modules cost less than $50

* Cross-platform - The Arduino software runs on Windows, Macintosh OSX, and Linux operating systems. Most microcontroller systems are limited to Windows.

* Simple, clear programming environment - The Arduino programming environment is easy-to-use for beginners, yet flexible enough for advanced users to take advantage of as well. For teachers, it's conveniently based on the Processing programming environment, so students learning to program in that environment will be familiar with the look and feel of Arduino

* Open source and extensible software- The Arduino software and is published as open source tools, available for extension by experienced programmers. The language can be expanded through C++ libraries, and people wanting to understand the technical details can make the leap from Arduino to the AVR C programming language on which it's based. SImilarly, you can add AVR-C code directly into your Arduino programs if you want to.

* Open source and extensible hardware - The Arduino is based on Atmel's ATMEGA8 and ATMEGA168 microcontrollers. The plans for the modules are published under a Creative Commons license, so experienced circuit designers can make their own version of the module, extending it and improving it. Even relatively inexperienced users can build the breadboard version of the module in order to understand how it works and save money.

!!!How do I use Arduino?

To get started, follow the instructions for your operating system: [[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]] or [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; or the additional instructions for your board: [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]], [[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]], or shield: [[Guide/ArduinoXbeeShield | Xbee]].
to:
(:tableend:)
September 01, 2007, at 06:00 AM by David A. Mellis - (removing references which shouldn't have been there anyway)
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* [[Guide/References]]: links to and descriptions of other source of information on Arduino (on this site and elsewhere).
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August 13, 2007, at 02:19 AM by David A. Mellis -
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To get started, follow the instructions for your operating system: [[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]] or [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; or the additional instructions for your board: [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]], [[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]], or shield: [[Guide/ArduinoXbeeShield | Xbee shield]].
to:
To get started, follow the instructions for your operating system: [[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]] or [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; or the additional instructions for your board: [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]], [[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]], or shield: [[Guide/ArduinoXbeeShield | Xbee]].
August 13, 2007, at 02:18 AM by David A. Mellis -
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* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]], [[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working.
to:
* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]], [[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]]; [[Guide/ArduinoXbeeShield | Xbee shield]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working.
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To get started, follow the instructions for your operating system: [[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]] or [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; or the additional instructions for your board: [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]], [[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]].
to:
To get started, follow the instructions for your operating system: [[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]] or [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; or the additional instructions for your board: [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]], [[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]], or shield: [[Guide/ArduinoXbeeShield | Xbee shield]].
June 16, 2007, at 12:33 AM by David A. Mellis - removing broken link to videos
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* [[http://www.sbk.flr4.org/arduino/index.html | Video lectures]]: Tom Igoe introduces Arduino. (thanks to Pollie Barden).
January 27, 2007, at 03:23 PM by David A. Mellis -
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* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working.
to:
* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]], [[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working.
Changed line 62 from:
To get started, follow the instructions for your operating system: [[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]] or [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]].
to:
To get started, follow the instructions for your operating system: [[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]] or [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; or the additional instructions for your board: [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]], [[Guide/ArduinoBT | Arduino BT]].
January 07, 2007, at 02:25 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed line 12 from:
* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working.
to:
* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]; [[Guide/ArduinoMini | Arduino Mini]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working.
December 25, 2006, at 08:47 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed line 11 from:
* [[Guide/Guide | Introduction]] (this page): an explaination of what Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.
to:
* [[Guide/Guide | Introduction]] (this page): an explanation of what Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.
December 04, 2006, at 11:39 PM by David A. Mellis - adding links to the howtos.
Changed lines 58-62 from:
* Open source and extensible hardware - The Arduino is based on Atmel's ATMEGA8 and ATMEGA168 microcontrollers. The plans for the modules are published under a Creative Commons license, so experienced circuit designers can make their own version of the module, extending it and improving it. Even relatively inexperienced users can build the breadboard version of the module in order to understand how it works and save money.
to:
* Open source and extensible hardware - The Arduino is based on Atmel's ATMEGA8 and ATMEGA168 microcontrollers. The plans for the modules are published under a Creative Commons license, so experienced circuit designers can make their own version of the module, extending it and improving it. Even relatively inexperienced users can build the breadboard version of the module in order to understand how it works and save money.

!!!How do I use Arduino?

To get started, follow the instructions for your operating system: [[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]] or [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]].
December 02, 2006, at 05:43 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added line 1:
(:title Guide:)
November 18, 2006, at 09:10 AM by David A. Mellis - fixing link to Arduino booklet
Changed lines 19-20 from:
* [[Booklet/Homepage | Arduino booklet]]: an introduction to physical computing, electronics, and Arduino.
to:
* [[Booklet/HomePage | Arduino booklet]]: an introduction to physical computing, electronics, and Arduino.
November 18, 2006, at 09:09 AM by David A. Mellis - adding link to Arduino booklet
Added lines 17-20:
!!!Elsewhere on the Arduino website

* [[Booklet/Homepage | Arduino booklet]]: an introduction to physical computing, electronics, and Arduino.
November 04, 2006, at 08:16 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 25-30:
* [[http://wiring.org.co/reference/electronics/index.html | Wiring electronics reference]]: circuit diagrams for connecting a variety of basic electronic components.

* [[http://wiring.org.co/learning/tutorials/diagrams.html | Schematics to circuits]]: from Wiring, a guide to transforming circuit diagrams into physical circuits.

* [[http://tigoe.net/pcomp/ | Tom Igoe's Physical Computing Site]]: lots of information on electronics, microcontrollers, sensors, actuators, books, etc.
November 04, 2006, at 08:14 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 3-7:
(:table width=90% border=0 cellpadding=5 cellspacing=0:)
(:cell width=50%:)

!!!In This Guide
Added lines 17-26:
(:cell width=50%:)

!!!External Resources

* [[http://www.sbk.flr4.org/arduino/index.html | Video lectures]]: Tom Igoe introduces Arduino. (thanks to Pollie Barden).

* [[http://todbot.com/blog/spookyarduino/ | Course guides]]: Longer documents introducing Arduino: [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class1.pdf | class 1 (getting started)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class2.pdf | class 2 (input and sensors)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class3.pdf | class 3 (communication, servos, and pwm)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class4.pdf | class 4 (piezo sound & sensors, arduino+processing, stand-alone operation)]].

(:tableend:)
November 04, 2006, at 07:19 PM by David A. Mellis -
Deleted lines 2-3:
!!!In This Guide
November 04, 2006, at 07:19 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 12-13 from:
to:
* [[Guide/References]]: links to and descriptions of other source of information on Arduino (on this site and elsewhere).
November 04, 2006, at 07:18 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed line 7 from:
* [[Guide/Guide | Introduction]]: an explains of what Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.
to:
* [[Guide/Guide | Introduction]] (this page): an explaination of what Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.
Changed lines 13-42 from:
!!!Other Parts of the Arduino Website

* [[Tutorial/HomePage | Tutorials]]: code examples and circuits for performing many tasks.

* [[Reference/HomePage | Reference]]: documentation of the Arduino programming language and functions.

* [[Main/Hardware | Hardware]]: descriptions of the various Arduino boards and other hardware, with schematics, PCB layout files, assembly instructions, etc.

* [[Main/ComparisonProcessing | Language comparison]]: compares the Arduino/Wiring language (based on C/C++) with Processing (based on Java).

* [[Main/FAQ]]: frequently asked questions about Arduino.

* [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl | Discussion forums]]: for questions about anything Arduino related.

* [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/ | Playground]]: a publicly editable wiki collecting community documentation ([[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Main/Participate#requestaccess | register here]]).

!!!External Resources on Arduino

* [[http://www.sbk.flr4.org/arduino/index.html | Video lectures]]: Tom Igoe introduces Arduino. (thanks to Pollie Barden).

* [[http://todbot.com/blog/spookyarduino/ | Course guides]]: Longer documents introducing Arduino: [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class1.pdf | class 1 (getting started)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class2.pdf | class 2 (input and sensors)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class3.pdf | class 3 (communication, servos, and pwm)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class4.pdf | class 4 (piezo sound & sensors, arduino+processing, stand-alone operation)]].

!!!Related Sites

* [[http://www.instantsoup.org/ | Instant Soup]] is an introduction to electronics through a series of beautifully-documented fun projects.

* [[http://www.makezine.com/ | Make magazine]] has some great links in its [[http://www.makezine.com/blog/archive/electronics/ | electronics archive]].

* [[http://www.hackaday.com/ | hack a day]] has links to interesting hacks and how-to articles on various topics.
to:
!!!What is Arduino?

Arduino is a tool for making computers that can sense and control more of the physical world than your desktop computer. It's an open-source physical computing platform based on a simple microcontroller board, and a development environment for writing software for the board.

Arduino can be used to develop interactive objects, taking inputs from a variety of switches or sensors, and controlling a variety of lights, motors, and other physical outputs. Arduino projects can be stand-alone, or they can be communicate with software running on your computer (e.g. Flash, Processing, MaxMSP.) The boards can be assembled by hand or purchased preassembled; the open-source IDE can be downloaded for free.

The Arduino programming language is an implementation of Wiring, a similar physical computing platform, which is based on the Processing multimedia programming environment.

!!!Why Arduino?

There are many other microcontrollers and microcontroller platforms available for physical computing. Parallax Basic Stamp, Netmedia's BX-24, Phidgets, MIT's Handyboard, and many others offer similar functionality. All of these tools take the messy details of microcontroller programming and wrap it up in an easy-to-use package. Arduino also simplifies the process of working with microcontrollers, but it offers some advantage for teachers, students, and interested amateurs over other systems:

* Inexpensive - Arduino boards are relatively inexpensive compared to other microcontroller platforms. The least expensive version of the Arduino module can be assembled by hand, and even the pre-assembled Arduino modules cost less than $50

* Cross-platform - The Arduino software runs on Windows, Macintosh OSX, and Linux operating systems. Most microcontroller systems are limited to Windows.

* Simple, clear programming environment - The Arduino programming environment is easy-to-use for beginners, yet flexible enough for advanced users to take advantage of as well. For teachers, it's conveniently based on the Processing programming environment, so students learning to program in that environment will be familiar with the look and feel of Arduino

* Open source and extensible software- The Arduino software and is published as open source tools, available for extension by experienced programmers. The language can be expanded through C++ libraries, and people wanting to understand the technical details can make the leap from Arduino to the AVR C programming language on which it's based. SImilarly, you can add AVR-C code directly into your Arduino programs if you want to.

* Open source and extensible hardware - The Arduino is based on Atmel's ATMEGA8 and ATMEGA168 microcontrollers. The plans for the modules are published under a Creative Commons license, so experienced circuit designers can make their own version of the module, extending it and improving it. Even relatively inexperienced users can build the breadboard version of the module in order to understand how it works and save money.
November 04, 2006, at 07:16 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 19-20:
* [[Main/Hardware | Hardware]]: descriptions of the various Arduino boards and other hardware, with schematics, PCB layout files, assembly instructions, etc.
November 04, 2006, at 07:14 PM by David A. Mellis -
Deleted lines 2-3:
(:table width=90% border=0 cellpadding=5 cellspacing=0:)
(:cell width=50%:)
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(:cell width=50%:)
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(:cellnr width=50%:)
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(:cell width=50%:)
Deleted lines 40-41:

(:tableend:)
November 04, 2006, at 07:11 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 9-15 from:
* [[Guide/Guide | Introduction]]: this page, which explains what it is and why you'd want to use it
* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working
* [[Guide/Troubleshooting]]: what to do if things don't work
* [[Guide/Board]]: description of the Arduino board and its parts
* [[Guide/Environment]]: description of the Arduino development environment and its parts
* [[Guide/References]]: pointers to other sources of information, on this site and elsewhere, for learning more
to:
* [[Guide/Guide | Introduction]]: an explains of what Arduino is and why you'd want to use it.
* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working.
* [[Guide/Troubleshooting]]: what to do if things don't work.
* [[Guide/Board]]: description of the Arduino board and its parts.
* [[Guide/Environment]]: description of the Arduino development environment and its parts.
Changed lines 50-72 from:
(:tableend:)

!!!What is Arduino?

Arduino is a tool for making computers that can sense and control more of the physical world than your desktop computer. It's an open-source physical computing platform based on a simple microcontroller board, and a development environment for writing software for the board.

Arduino can be used to develop interactive objects, taking inputs from a variety of switches or sensors, and controlling a variety of lights, motors, and other physical outputs. Arduino projects can be stand-alone, or they can be communicate with software running on your computer (e.g. Flash, Processing, MaxMSP.) The boards can be assembled by hand or purchased preassembled; the open-source IDE can be downloaded for free.

The Arduino programming language is an implementation of Wiring, a similar physical computing platform, which is based on the Processing multimedia programming environment.

!!!Why Arduino?

There are many other microcontrollers and microcontroller platforms available for physical computing. Parallax Basic Stamp, Netmedia's BX-24, Phidgets, MIT's Handyboard, and many others offer similar functionality. All of these tools take the messy details of microcontroller programming and wrap it up in an easy-to-use package. Arduino also simplifies the process of working with microcontrollers, but it offers some advantage for teachers, students, and interested amateurs over other systems:

* Inexpensive - Arduino boards are relatively inexpensive compared to other microcontroller platforms. The least expensive version of the Arduino module can be assembled by hand, and even the pre-assembled Arduino modules cost less than $50

* Cross-platform - The Arduino software runs on Windows, Macintosh OSX, and Linux operating systems. Most microcontroller systems are limited to Windows.

* Simple, clear programming environment - The Arduino programming environment is easy-to-use for beginners, yet flexible enough for advanced users to take advantage of as well. For teachers, it's conveniently based on the Processing programming environment, so students learning to program in that environment will be familiar with the look and feel of Arduino

* Open source and extensible software- The Arduino software and is published as open source tools, available for extension by experienced programmers. The language can be expanded through C++ libraries, and people wanting to understand the technical details can make the leap from Arduino to the AVR C programming language on which it's based. SImilarly, you can add AVR-C code directly into your Arduino programs if you want to.

* Open source and extensible hardware - The Arduino is based on Atmel's ATMEGA8 and ATMEGA168 microcontrollers. The plans for the modules are published under a Creative Commons license, so experienced circuit designers can make their own version of the module, extending it and improving it. Even relatively inexperienced users can build the breadboard version of the module in order to understand how it works and save money.
to:
(:tableend:)
November 04, 2006, at 07:09 PM by David A. Mellis -
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(:cellnr width=50%:)
Added lines 40-41:
(:cell width=50%:)
November 04, 2006, at 07:08 PM by David A. Mellis -
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!!!Other Resources
to:
!!!Other Parts of the Arduino Website
Added lines 26-33:
* [[Main/FAQ]]: frequently asked questions about Arduino.

* [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl | Discussion forums]]: for questions about anything Arduino related.

* [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/ | Playground]]: a publicly editable wiki collecting community documentation ([[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Main/Participate#requestaccess | register here]]).

!!!External Resources on Arduino
Deleted line 35:
Added lines 38-46:
!!!Related Sites

* [[http://www.instantsoup.org/ | Instant Soup]] is an introduction to electronics through a series of beautifully-documented fun projects.

* [[http://www.makezine.com/ | Make magazine]] has some great links in its [[http://www.makezine.com/blog/archive/electronics/ | electronics archive]].

* [[http://www.hackaday.com/ | hack a day]] has links to interesting hacks and how-to articles on various topics.

November 04, 2006, at 07:03 PM by David A. Mellis - adding external resources
Added lines 3-6:
(:table width=90% border=0 cellpadding=5 cellspacing=0:)
(:cell width=50%:)
!!!In This Guide
Added lines 16-32:
(:cell width=50%:)

!!!Other Resources

* [[Tutorial/HomePage | Tutorials]]: code examples and circuits for performing many tasks.

* [[Reference/HomePage | Reference]]: documentation of the Arduino programming language and functions.

* [[Main/ComparisonProcessing | Language comparison]]: compares the Arduino/Wiring language (based on C/C++) with Processing (based on Java).

* [[http://www.sbk.flr4.org/arduino/index.html | Video lectures]]: Tom Igoe introduces Arduino. (thanks to Pollie Barden).


* [[http://todbot.com/blog/spookyarduino/ | Course guides]]: Longer documents introducing Arduino: [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class1.pdf | class 1 (getting started)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class2.pdf | class 2 (input and sensors)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class3.pdf | class 3 (communication, servos, and pwm)]], [[http://todbot.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/arduino_spooky_projects_class4.pdf | class 4 (piezo sound & sensors, arduino+processing, stand-alone operation)]].

(:tableend:)
November 04, 2006, at 05:01 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed line 6 from:
* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working
to:
* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | Linux]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working
November 04, 2006, at 03:05 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added line 7:
* [[Guide/Troubleshooting]]: what to do if things don't work
November 04, 2006, at 01:56 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed line 6 from:
* [[Guide/Howto | How To]]: step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working
to:
* How To ([[Guide/Windows | Windows]], [[Guide/MacOSX | Mac OS X]]): step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working
October 22, 2006, at 07:19 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 1-31:
!!Guide to Arduino

This guide tell you everything you need to get started with Arduino. It consists of the following pages:

* [[Guide/Guide | Introduction]]: this page, which explains what it is and why you'd want to use it
* [[Guide/Howto | How To]]: step-by-step instructions on getting your first Arduino program working
* [[Guide/Board]]: description of the Arduino board and its parts
* [[Guide/Environment]]: description of the Arduino development environment and its parts
* [[Guide/References]]: pointers to other sources of information, on this site and elsewhere, for learning more

!!!What is Arduino?

Arduino is a tool for making computers that can sense and control more of the physical world than your desktop computer. It's an open-source physical computing platform based on a simple microcontroller board, and a development environment for writing software for the board.

Arduino can be used to develop interactive objects, taking inputs from a variety of switches or sensors, and controlling a variety of lights, motors, and other physical outputs. Arduino projects can be stand-alone, or they can be communicate with software running on your computer (e.g. Flash, Processing, MaxMSP.) The boards can be assembled by hand or purchased preassembled; the open-source IDE can be downloaded for free.

The Arduino programming language is an implementation of Wiring, a similar physical computing platform, which is based on the Processing multimedia programming environment.

!!!Why Arduino?

There are many other microcontrollers and microcontroller platforms available for physical computing. Parallax Basic Stamp, Netmedia's BX-24, Phidgets, MIT's Handyboard, and many others offer similar functionality. All of these tools take the messy details of microcontroller programming and wrap it up in an easy-to-use package. Arduino also simplifies the process of working with microcontrollers, but it offers some advantage for teachers, students, and interested amateurs over other systems:

* Inexpensive - Arduino boards are relatively inexpensive compared to other microcontroller platforms. The least expensive version of the Arduino module can be assembled by hand, and even the pre-assembled Arduino modules cost less than $50

* Cross-platform - The Arduino software runs on Windows, Macintosh OSX, and Linux operating systems. Most microcontroller systems are limited to Windows.

* Simple, clear programming environment - The Arduino programming environment is easy-to-use for beginners, yet flexible enough for advanced users to take advantage of as well. For teachers, it's conveniently based on the Processing programming environment, so students learning to program in that environment will be familiar with the look and feel of Arduino

* Open source and extensible software- The Arduino software and is published as open source tools, available for extension by experienced programmers. The language can be expanded through C++ libraries, and people wanting to understand the technical details can make the leap from Arduino to the AVR C programming language on which it's based. SImilarly, you can add AVR-C code directly into your Arduino programs if you want to.

* Open source and extensible hardware - The Arduino is based on Atmel's ATMEGA8 and ATMEGA168 microcontrollers. The plans for the modules are published under a Creative Commons license, so experienced circuit designers can make their own version of the module, extending it and improving it. Even relatively inexperienced users can build the breadboard version of the module in order to understand how it works and save money.

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