Guide.Robot History

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February 20, 2014, at 12:33 PM by Roberto Guido -
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The SD card is used to store information for the robot to read. It comes preloaded with images and sound files used in the Explore examples. Once comfortable with the robot's functionality, you should be able to add your own files. If you ever accidentally remove files used by the explore sketches, you can copy them over from the SDcontent directory found in the robot library. Alternatively you can download the files here: Attach:sdContent.zip.

to:

The SD card is used to store information for the robot to read. It comes preloaded with images and sound files used in the Explore examples. Once comfortable with the robot's functionality, you should be able to add your own files. If you ever accidentally remove files used by the explore sketches, you can copy them over from the SDcontent directory found in the robot library. Alternatively you can download the files here.

February 20, 2014, at 12:28 PM by Roberto Guido -
Changed lines 31-32 from:

The SD card is used to store information for the robot to read. It comes preloaded with images and sound files used in the Explore examples. Once comfortable with the robot's functionality, you should be able to add your own files. If you ever accidentally remove files used by the explore sketches, you can copy them over from the SDcontent directory found in the robot library. Alternatively you can download the files here: sdContent.zip.

to:

The SD card is used to store information for the robot to read. It comes preloaded with images and sound files used in the Explore examples. Once comfortable with the robot's functionality, you should be able to add your own files. If you ever accidentally remove files used by the explore sketches, you can copy them over from the SDcontent directory found in the robot library. Alternatively you can download the files here: Attach:sdContent.zip.

February 20, 2014, at 12:24 PM by Roberto Guido - substituted link to GitHub with local file
Changed lines 31-32 from:

The SD card is used to store information for the robot to read. It comes preloaded with images and sound files used in the Explore examples. Once comfortable with the robot's functionality, you should be able to add your own files. If you ever accidentally remove files used by the explore sketches, you can copy them over from the SDcontent directory found in the robot library. Alternatively you can download the files from github repo

to:

The SD card is used to store information for the robot to read. It comes preloaded with images and sound files used in the Explore examples. Once comfortable with the robot's functionality, you should be able to add your own files. If you ever accidentally remove files used by the explore sketches, you can copy them over from the SDcontent directory found in the robot library. Alternatively you can download the files here: sdContent.zip.

February 10, 2014, at 11:37 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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In setup(), you must call Robot.begin() to initialize the robot's functions. Also call Robot.beginLCD() to initialize the screen.

to:

In setup(), you must call Robot.begin() to initialize the robot's functions. Also call Robot.beginTFT() to initialize the screen.

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  Robot.beginLCD();
to:
  Robot.beginTFT();
February 10, 2014, at 11:36 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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  Robot.beginLCD();
to:
  Robot.beginTFT();
October 15, 2013, at 02:30 PM by Xun Yang -
Changed lines 31-32 from:

The SD card is used to store information for the robot to read. It comes preloaded with images and sound files used in the Explore examples. Once comfortable with the robot's functionality, you should be able to add your own files. If you ever accidentally remove files used by the explore sketches, you can copy them over from the SDcontent directory found in the robot library.

to:

The SD card is used to store information for the robot to read. It comes preloaded with images and sound files used in the Explore examples. Once comfortable with the robot's functionality, you should be able to add your own files. If you ever accidentally remove files used by the explore sketches, you can copy them over from the SDcontent directory found in the robot library. Alternatively you can download the files from github repo

September 30, 2013, at 09:00 PM by Roberto Guido - todo's corrections
Changed line 19 from:

Setting up the Robot

to:

Setting up the Robot

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Content on the SD card

to:

Content on the SD card

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Connecting the robot to your computer

to:

Connecting the robot to your computer

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Installing the drivers

OSX
to:

Installing the drivers

OSX

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Windows
to:

Windows

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Linux
to:

Linux

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Hello User!

to:

Hello User!

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Uploading a test sketch

to:

Uploading a test sketch

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Moving the Robot

to:

Moving the Robot

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Change the motor speed with the potentiometer

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Change the motor speed with the potentiometer

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Making some noise

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Making some noise

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Next steps

to:

Next steps

May 17, 2013, at 08:28 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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There are many many things you can do with the robot. The few examples on this page don't do it justice. To see some more complex examples that of what the robot can do, look at the sketches found in the Explore folder of the robot examples. These are more complete examples that show you some different applications for the robot.

to:

There are many things you can do with the robot. The few examples on this page don't do it justice. To see some more complex examples that of what the robot can do, look at the sketches found in the Explore folder of the robot examples. These are more complete examples that show you some different applications for the robot.

May 15, 2013, at 05:29 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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There are two different boards on the Robot: the Control Board (top) and the Motor Board (bottom). If you're just getting started with electronics and programming, you should work with the Control Board. As you become more experienced, you may want to tinker with the Motor Board.

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There are two different boards on the Robot: the Control Board (top) and the Motor Board (bottom). If you're just getting started with electronics and programming, you should work with the Control Board. As you become more experienced, you may want to tinker with the Motor Board.

to:

Robot Control board

Robot Motor Board

May 15, 2013, at 05:27 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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May 15, 2013, at 05:02 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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To program the robot, connect the Control Board to your computer via USB. Open the Arduino IDE, and load the sketch located in File > Examples > Robot_Control > Explore > MotorTest.

to:

To program the robot, connect the Control Board to your computer via USB. Open the Arduino IDE, and load the sketch located in File > Examples > Robot_Control > learn > MotorTest.

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The Arduino IDE needs to know which of your USB ports the robot is connected to. The Tools > Serial menu lists the available ports.

to:

The Arduino IDE must know which of your USB ports the robot is connected to. The Tools > Serial menu lists the available ports.

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If the robot is not moving, turn the power switch off. Connect the motor board to the computer with a USB cable. Load the File > Examples > Robot_Motor > Robot_Motor_Core sketch in the IDE, and select Arduino Robot Motor from the Boards menu. Upload this sketch, disconnect from the computer and try turning it on again.

to:

If the robot is not moving, turn the power switch off. Connect the motor board to the computer with a USB cable. Load the File > Examples > Robot_Motor > Robot_Motor_Core sketch in the IDE, and select Arduino Robot Motor from the Boards menu. Upload this sketch, disconnect from the computer and try turning it on again.

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  • When the status bar shows "Uploading...", double press the reset button on Control Board
to:
  • When the status bar shows "Uploading...", double press the reset button on the Control Board
May 15, 2013, at 05:00 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 24-26 from:
to:

Content on the SD card

The SD card is used to store information for the robot to read. It comes preloaded with images and sound files used in the Explore examples. Once comfortable with the robot's functionality, you should be able to add your own files. If you ever accidentally remove files used by the explore sketches, you can copy them over from the SDcontent directory found in the robot library.

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If the LEDs on either board do not turn on, check if the flat 10-pin communication cable next to the power switch is connected to both boards. Without the communication cable connected, the Control Board will not be powered.

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If the LEDs on either board do not turn on, check if the flat 10-pin communication cable next to the power switch is connected to both boards.

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Once you've uploaded the sketch, unplug the USB cable for the robot. Whenever the USB is connected, the robot's motors are disengaged. Turn on the power and watch it move around!

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To begin programming the robot, make sure you can get information from its pushbuttons. You'll be writing a sketch that prints the button presses to the screen.

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You'll be writing a sketch that prints the button presses to the screen.

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In the explore folder of the robot examples, there is a sketch called Logo, which incorporates this example with the robot movement from above.

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Output with actuator

You can drive the motors or play a music through the speaker, with the methods provided by the robot library. See sketch File> Example > Robot_Control > explore >Beep, melody, motorTest and turnTest, as well as learn > R01_Logo and R03_Disco_Botfor details

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Now that you have tested the basic functionality of the robot, see the Robot's examples page. See also the hardware page for more information about the technical aspects of the Robot.

to:

There are many many things you can do with the robot. The few examples on this page don't do it justice. To see some more complex examples that of what the robot can do, look at the sketches found in the Explore folder of the robot examples. These are more complete examples that show you some different applications for the robot.

To learn about more of the functionality of the specific inputs and outputs of the robot, look at the learn folder in the robot examples.

Be sure to check out the Robot's library page and the hardware page for more information about the technical aspects of the Robot.

May 15, 2013, at 04:36 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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Available sensors

  • 5 buttons
  • 2 Potentiometers (1 for motor calibration, one as general input)
  • 1 Digital Compass
  • 5 Reflective infrared sensors (for line following)

Available actuators

  • 2 Motors
  • 1 Speaker

More good stuff

  • TFT LCD screen
  • SD card reader
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Setting up the Robot

When you first open the robot, you'll need to set up a pair of things before it is ready to roll.

First, you'll need to insert the SD card into the slot on the backside of the TFT screen, and then insert the screen into the socket on the control board of the robot. The screen should be oriented so that the blue text with the text "SD Card" is close to the buttons and speaker.

Once that's in place, you'll need to attach the protective cover for the botom board. This will help prevent any objects on the ground from damaging the motor board. Attach the protective covering to the underside of the robot as shown below.

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You need to tell the IDE which Arduino board you are targeting with your software, so open the Tools > Board menu and choose Robot_Control.

to:

You need to tell the IDE which Arduino board you are targeting with your software, so open the Tools > Board menu and choose Arduino Robot Control.

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If the robot is not moving, turn the power switch off. Connect the motor board to the computer with a USB cable. Load the File > Examples > Robot_Motor > Robot_Motor_Core sketch in the IDE, and select Robot_Motor from the Boards menu. Upload this sketch, disconnect from the computer and try turning it on again.

to:

If the robot is not moving, turn the power switch off. Connect the motor board to the computer with a USB cable. Load the File > Examples > Robot_Motor > Robot_Motor_Core sketch in the IDE, and select Arduino Robot Motor from the Boards menu. Upload this sketch, disconnect from the computer and try turning it on again.

May 13, 2013, at 12:19 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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  • TFT LCD
to:
  • TFT LCD screen
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Each board on the robot has a microcontroller, which is programmed independently of the other. It is recommended that you should only program the control board until you are familiar with the robot's functionality. The motor board has a stock firmware that fulfills most general purpose applications.

to:

Each board on the robot has a microcontroller, which is programmed independently of the other. It is recommended that you should only program the control board (the top board) until you are familiar with the robot's functionality. The motor board (the bottom board) has a stock firmware that fulfills most general purpose applications.

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Connect the top (aka control) board to your computer with a USB cable.

to:

Connect the control board to your computer with a USB cable.

May 13, 2013, at 09:47 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 140-142 from:

Input from a sensor

The robot library provides an interface to the potentiometer, buttons, and compass on the control board. See sketch File> Example > Robot_Control > explore >Compass and KeyboardTest, as well as learn > R05_Inputs for details.

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May 08, 2013, at 05:41 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
May 08, 2013, at 05:30 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Deleted lines 26-27:
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Installing the drivers

Instructions for Mac OS X
to:

Installing the drivers

OSX
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Instructions for Windows
to:
Windows
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Instructions for Linux
to:
Linux
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Uploading code

Connect the robot's Control Board. Open Arduino IDE, load sketch File > Examples > Robot_Control > Explore > MotorTest.

Since the Arduino IDE is used for many different Arduino boards, you need to tell it that you're working with the robot. Open the Tools > Board menu and choose Robot_Control.

The Arduino IDE needs to know which of your USB ports the robot is connected to. The Tools > Serial menu lists the available ports:

  • if only one item is shown, click on that one;

  • if two or more are shown, you can disconnect the Control Board and re-open the menu; the entry that disappears should be the robot. Reconnect the board and select that serial port.

Now, simply click the "Upload" button in the environment. Wait a few seconds - you should see the RX and TX leds on the board flashing. If the upload is successful, the message "Done uploading." will appear in the status bar of the software.

Now unplug the robot, turn on the power switch and put it on the ground. The robot should show you a few basic moves. Congratulations! You've gotten the robot up and running.

If the robot is not moving, load sketch File > Examples > Robot_Motor > Robot_Motor_Core. Upload it to the Motor Board(bottom one). If you accidentally uploaded code to the Motor Board, this one will return it to normal.

Note: If no Serial port shows up after you plug in the robot, and restarting the IDE/unplug-replug the robot does not help, follow the steps below:

  • Open a very simple sketch, like Blink or BareMinimum
  • Press the upload button
  • When the status bar shows "Uploading...", double press the reset button on Control Board
  • Now the Serial port should show up.

This may happen if your sketch is very complicated. Try to simplify it. Or if the robot is working as intended, and you can't simplify the sketch more, just upload your code with the "double press" method above, ignoring the missing Serial port.

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By default the Arduino Robot comes with a preloaded sketch that will ask you for your name, its own name ( you gotta name your robot!!), and where you are located at. You should be able of answering those questions by just interacting with the Robot using the buttons and the potentiometer.

Power up the robot by either inserting 4 AAA batteries and turn on the power switch on the Motor Board (bottom one), or plug an Arduino USB cable to either of the USB ports on the robot.

to:

The Arduino Robot comes with a preloaded application that will ask for your name, what you want to name the robot, and where you are located. Look at the screen on the robot for information on how to input your information using the buttons and potentiometer.

You can power the robot by with 4 AAA batteries, or connect a USB cable to either the motor or control board.

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Now the robot will greet you with a pre-installed sketch "Hello User!". Take some time to go through it, and follow the instructions.

First Sketch

to:

Once you have gone through the setup process with the robot, you can start writing your own programs to control it.

Uploading a test sketch

To program the robot, connect the Control Board to your computer via USB. Open the Arduino IDE, and load the sketch located in File > Examples > Robot_Control > Explore > MotorTest.

You need to tell the IDE which Arduino board you are targeting with your software, so open the Tools > Board menu and choose Robot_Control.

The Arduino IDE needs to know which of your USB ports the robot is connected to. The Tools > Serial menu lists the available ports.

  • if only one item is shown, click on that one.

  • if two or more are shown, you can disconnect the Control Board and re-open the menu; the entry that disappears should be the robot. Reconnect the board and select that serial port.

Click the "Upload" button in the top left of the IDE window. Wait a few seconds - you should see the RX and TX leds on the board flashing. If the upload is successful, the message "Done uploading." will appear in the status bar of the software. Once this appears, you can disconnect the robot from the USB cable

With batteries in the robot, turn on the power switch and put it on the ground. The robot should show you a few basic moves. Congratulations! You've gotten the robot up and running.

If the robot is not moving, turn the power switch off. Connect the motor board to the computer with a USB cable. Load the File > Examples > Robot_Motor > Robot_Motor_Core sketch in the IDE, and select Robot_Motor from the Boards menu. Upload this sketch, disconnect from the computer and try turning it on again.

Note: If no Serial port shows up after you plug in the robot, and restarting the IDE/unplug-replug the robot does not help, follow the steps below:

  • Open a very simple sketch, like Blink or BareMinimum
  • Press the upload button
  • When the status bar shows "Uploading...", double press the reset button on Control Board
  • The Serial port should appear as normally.

Moving the Robot

This sketch moves the robot back and forth repeatedly.

Whenever you're writing code for the robot, make sure to include <ArduinoRobot.h> at the beginning of the sketch. This imports the necessary libraries to control the robot.

There's no need to initialize the Robot object.

To get the wheels to move, call Robot.motorsWrite(). motorsWrite() requires 2 arguments, the speed of the left motor, and the speed of the right motor. These values range from -255 to 255, where -255 is full reverse, and 255 is full speed forward. If you pass a value of 0, the motor will stop spinning the wheel.

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  1. include <ArduinoRobot.h>
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  1. include <ArduinoRobot.h> // import the robot library
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  Robot.begin();
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  Robot.begin(); // initialize the library
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  Robot.motorsWrite(255,255);//forward
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  // move forward for one second
  Robot.motorsWrite(255,255);
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  Robot.motorsWrite(0,0);
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  Robot.motorsWrite(0,0); // stop moving
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  Robot.motorsWrite(-255,-255);//backward
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  // move backwards for one second
  Robot.motorsWrite(-255,-255);
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  Robot.motorsWrite(0,0);
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  Robot.motorsWrite(0,0); // stop moving
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This sketch shows you how to code for the robot, and the basic movements.

Whenever you're writing code for the robot, do include <ArduinoRobot.h> at the beginning of the sketch. It'll be possible to access the Robot only after this line is added.

And if you're using robot-specific methods, you need to call it as Robot.methodName(). There's no need to initialize the Robot object, it's already done for you.

Robot.motorsWrite(speedL, speedR) drives the motors for you. SpeedL and SpeedR specifies the speed of motors, the speed ranges from -255 to 255, represents full speed backwards to full speed forward.

So the programme gets the robot go forward for 1 second(1000 milliseconds), stop for 1 second, go backwards for 1 second, and stop for 1 second. Afterwards, the whole process restarts.

See the reference for how to use different functions

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The robot library has interface to the potentiometer(knob), keyboard and compass. See sketch File> Example > Robot_Control > explore >Compass and KeyboardTest, as well as learn > R05_Inputs for details.

to:

The robot library provides an interface to the potentiometer, buttons, and compass on the control board. See sketch File> Example > Robot_Control > explore >Compass and KeyboardTest, as well as learn > R05_Inputs for details.

May 08, 2013, at 04:33 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 14-15 from:
  • Keyboard(d-pad) with 5 buttons(up, down, left, right, middle)
  • 2 Potentiometers (1 is reserved for calibration)
to:
  • 5 buttons
  • 2 Potentiometers (1 for motor calibration, one as general input)
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  • 5 Reflective Infrared Sensor(for line following)
to:
  • 5 Reflective infrared sensors (for line following)
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Install the drivers

to:

Connecting the robot to your computer

Each board on the robot has a microcontroller, which is programmed independently of the other. It is recommended that you should only program the control board until you are familiar with the robot's functionality. The motor board has a stock firmware that fulfills most general purpose applications.

Connect the top (aka control) board to your computer with a USB cable.

After you have connected the board, the green LED labelled as PWR on the Control Board will be on. LED1 beneath it will flash a few times. On the Motor Board, the red LEDs labelled as LED1 to LED5 (opposite side to the power switch) should be on as well.

If the LEDs on either board do not turn on, check if the flat 10-pin communication cable next to the power switch is connected to both boards. Without the communication cable connected, the Control Board will not be powered.

Installing the drivers

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  • The first time you plug a robot into a Mac, the "Keyboard Setup Assistant" will launch. There's nothing to configure with the robot, so you can close this dialogue by clicking the red button in the top left of the window.
to:
  • The first time you plug a robot into a computer running OSX, the "Keyboard Setup Assistant" will launch. There's nothing to configure with the robot, so you can close this dialogue by clicking the red button in the top left of the window.
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There is no need to install drivers for Ubuntu 12.04.

Connecting to the robot for programming purposes

The two boards of the robot have separated microprocessors and therefore can be programmed separately. However, the Motor Board (bottom) has a firmware that meets most of the purposes, so it's recommended that a novice user should only program the Control Board (top).

Both boards can be connected with an Arduino USB cable, to one of the USB ports on a computer.

After you connected the board, the green LED labelled as PWR on Control Board will be on. LED1 beneath it will flash a few times. On the Motor Board, the red LEDs labelled as LED1 to LED5 (opposite side to the power switch) should be on as well.

If the LED on Control Board does not turn on, but the red LEDs on Motor Board do, check if the communication cable next to the power switch is connected to both boards. It's a flat cable, with 10-pin connectors on both sides. Without it properly connected, the Control Board will not be powered up.

to:

There is no need to install drivers for Linux. (Tested with Ubuntu 12.04)

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Connect the Control Board (top). Open Arduino IDE, load sketch File > Examples > Robot_Control > Explore > MotorTest.

to:

Connect the robot's Control Board. Open Arduino IDE, load sketch File > Examples > Robot_Control > Explore > MotorTest.

May 08, 2013, at 01:59 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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  • Full color LCD screen to represent BMP images
to:
  • TFT LCD
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Hello User!

By default the Arduino Robot comes with a preloaded sketch that will ask you for your name, its own name ( you gotta name your robot!!), and where you are located at. You should be able of answering those questions by just interacting with the Robot using the buttons and the potentiometer.

Power up the robot by either inserting 4 AAA batteries and turn on the power switch on the Motor Board (bottom one), or plug an Arduino USB cable to either of the USB ports on the robot.

Now the robot will greet you with a pre-installed sketch "Hello User!". Take some time to go through it, and follow the instructions.

Installing Arduino IDE

Make sure you have the latest version of Arduino's IDE. Otherwise the robot library and examples may not be available.

The download link for the Software corresponding to your operating system can be found here.

Connecting to the robot for programming purposes

The two boards of the robot have separated microprocessors and therefore can be programmed separately. However, the Motor Board (bottom) has a firmware that meets most of the purposes, so it's recommended that a novice user should only program the Control Board (top).

Both boards can be connected with an Arduino USB cable, to one of the USB ports on a computer.

After you connected the board, the green LED labelled as PWR on Control Board will be on. LED1 beneath it will flash a few times. On the Motor Board, the red LEDs labelled as LED1 to LED5 (opposite side to the power switch) should be on as well.

If the LED on Control Board does not turn on, but the red LEDs on Motor Board do, check if the communication cable next to the power switch is connected to both boards. It's a flat cable, with 10-pin connectors on both sides. Without it properly connected, the Control Board will not be powered up.

Changed lines 62-72 from:
to:

Connecting to the robot for programming purposes

The two boards of the robot have separated microprocessors and therefore can be programmed separately. However, the Motor Board (bottom) has a firmware that meets most of the purposes, so it's recommended that a novice user should only program the Control Board (top).

Both boards can be connected with an Arduino USB cable, to one of the USB ports on a computer.

After you connected the board, the green LED labelled as PWR on Control Board will be on. LED1 beneath it will flash a few times. On the Motor Board, the red LEDs labelled as LED1 to LED5 (opposite side to the power switch) should be on as well.

If the LED on Control Board does not turn on, but the red LEDs on Motor Board do, check if the communication cable next to the power switch is connected to both boards. It's a flat cable, with 10-pin connectors on both sides. Without it properly connected, the Control Board will not be powered up.

Changed line 87 from:
to:
Added lines 99-108:

Hello User!

By default the Arduino Robot comes with a preloaded sketch that will ask you for your name, its own name ( you gotta name your robot!!), and where you are located at. You should be able of answering those questions by just interacting with the Robot using the buttons and the potentiometer.

Power up the robot by either inserting 4 AAA batteries and turn on the power switch on the Motor Board (bottom one), or plug an Arduino USB cable to either of the USB ports on the robot.

Now the robot will greet you with a pre-installed sketch "Hello User!". Take some time to go through it, and follow the instructions.

May 08, 2013, at 01:56 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 5-8 from:

Attach:RobotTopView.png Δ

The robot comes with a large number of inputs; two potentiometers, five buttons, a digital compass, five floor sensors, and an SD card reader. It also has a speaker, two motors, and a color screen as outputs. You can control all these sensors and actuators through the Robot library?.

to:

The robot comes with a large number of inputs; two potentiometers, five buttons, a digital compass, five floor sensors, and an SD card reader. It also has a speaker, two motors, and a color screen as outputs. You can control all these sensors and actuators through the Robot library.

May 08, 2013, at 01:55 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 3-14 from:

The Arduino Robot is a tiny computer on wheels. It comes with a number of inputs and outputs. For inputs, there's two potentiometers, five buttons, a digital compass and five floor sensors. For outputs there is a speaker, two motors, as well as a full color screen and an SD card reader. At first sight it looks like a UFO, it is round and moves super quick!

With the Robot you can learn about electronics, mechanics and software all at once. Read sensor information and write software that helps the robot decide where to go next. At the same time, the robot can display whatever data it gets from the sensors onto its screen.

The Robot brings a new concept to the Arduino world. You can use the default examples and use it almost like a toy. It comes with a series of project examples you can easily replicate. At the same time it is a powerful robotics platform that you can hack in many ways to build robots that will perform all sorts of tasks.

There are two different boards on the Robot: the Control Board (top) and the Motor Board (bottom). As a novice user you will only program the Control Board and, as you get more experienced, you might want to hack the way the Motor Board works.

Therefore, programming for it is a bit different than for other Arduino boards. It has its own library that makes it easier to read from the input sensors and write to the output actuators. You'll see how to use the library in this guide and in the Arduino Robot library reference pages as well.

This guide will take you through the process of connecting the Arduino Robot to your computer and uploading an Arduino program, called a sketch.

to:

With the Arduino Robot, you can learn about electronics, mechanics, and software. It is a tiny computer on wheels. It comes with a number of of project examples you can easily replicate, and it is a powerful robotics platform that you can hack to perform all sorts of tasks.

Attach:RobotTopView.png Δ

The robot comes with a large number of inputs; two potentiometers, five buttons, a digital compass, five floor sensors, and an SD card reader. It also has a speaker, two motors, and a color screen as outputs. You can control all these sensors and actuators through the Robot library?.

There are two different boards on the Robot: the Control Board (top) and the Motor Board (bottom). If you're just getting started with electronics and programming, you should work with the Control Board. As you become more experienced, you may want to tinker with the Motor Board.

May 03, 2013, at 11:41 AM by Xun Yang -
Changed lines 11-12 from:

Therefore, programming for it is a bit different than for other Arduino boards. It has its own library that makes it easier to read from the input sensors and write to the output actuators. You'll see how to use the library in this guide and in the Arduino Robot library? reference pages as well.

to:

Therefore, programming for it is a bit different than for other Arduino boards. It has its own library that makes it easier to read from the input sensors and write to the output actuators. You'll see how to use the library in this guide and in the Arduino Robot library reference pages as well.

May 03, 2013, at 06:34 AM by David Cuartielles -
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See the reference? for how to use different functions

to:

See the reference for how to use different functions

Changed lines 152-153 from:

The robot library has interface to the potentiometer(knob), keyboard and compass. See sketch File> Example > Robot_Control > explore >Compass and KeyboardTest, as well as learn > R05_Inputs? for details.

to:

The robot library has interface to the potentiometer(knob), keyboard and compass. See sketch File> Example > Robot_Control > explore >Compass and KeyboardTest, as well as learn > R05_Inputs for details.

Changed lines 156-157 from:

sketch File> Example > Robot_Control > explore >Beep, melody, motorTest and turnTest, as well as learn > R01_Logo? and R03_Disco_Botfor? details

to:

sketch File> Example > Robot_Control > explore >Beep, melody, motorTest and turnTest, as well as learn > R01_Logo and R03_Disco_Botfor details

Changed line 160 from:

Now that you have tested the basic functionality of the robot, see the Lottie Lemon examples page. See also the hardware page for more information about the technical aspects pf the robot.

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Now that you have tested the basic functionality of the robot, see the Robot's examples page. See also the hardware page for more information about the technical aspects of the Robot.

May 03, 2013, at 06:33 AM by David Cuartielles -
Changed line 160 from:

Now that you have tested the basic functionality of the robot, see the Lottie Lemon examples? page. See also the hardware page for more information about the technical aspects pf the robot.

to:

Now that you have tested the basic functionality of the robot, see the Lottie Lemon examples page. See also the hardware page for more information about the technical aspects pf the robot.

May 01, 2013, at 08:02 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Added lines 1-162:

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