Main.ArduinoBoardEsplora History

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April 29, 2013, at 04:09 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
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April 29, 2013, at 04:06 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
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April 29, 2013, at 04:05 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
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January 21, 2013, at 12:36 PM by Roberto Guido - added comments box on bottom
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The maximum length and width of the Esplora PCB are 6.5 and 2.4 inches respectively, with the USB and TinkerKit connectors extending beyond the latter dimension. Four screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case.

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December 23, 2012, at 04:23 PM by Tom Igoe -
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preceding boards in that it provides a number of built-in, ready-to-use setof onboard sensors for interaction.

The Esplora has onboard sound and light output interfaces. It alos has the potential to expand its capabilities with two Tinkerkit input and output connectors, and a socket for a color TFT LCD screen.

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preceding Arduino boards in that it provides a number of built-in, ready-to-use setof onboard sensors for interaction. It's designed for people who want to get up and running with Arduino without having to learn about the electronics first. For a step-by-step introduction to the Esplora, check out the Getting Started with Esplora guide.

The Esplora has onboard sound and light outputs, and several input sensors, including a joystick, a slider, a temperature sensor, an accelerometer, a microphone, and a light sensor. It also has the potential to expand its capabilities with two Tinkerkit input and output connectors, and a socket for a color TFT LCD screen.

December 10, 2012, at 04:27 PM by Federico -
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December 10, 2012, at 03:41 PM by Federico -
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December 10, 2012, at 03:39 PM by Federico -
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Visit the Esplora reference page to see the complete documentation of the library and examples.

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Visit the Esplora library reference page to see the complete documentation of the library and examples.

December 07, 2012, at 04:59 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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these are detailed on the getting started page.

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these are detailed on the getting started page.

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The Esplora can be programmed with the Arduino software (download). Select "Arduino Esplora" from the Tools > Board menu. For details, see the getting started page?.

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The Esplora can be programmed with the Arduino software (download). Select "Arduino Esplora" from the Tools > Board menu. For details, see the getting started page.

December 07, 2012, at 04:56 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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preceding boards because it provides a built-in, ready-to-use set of onboard sensors, targeted for user interaction.

It also has an onboard sound and light output interfaces and the possibility to exapand the capabilities with two inputs and two output connectors and a socket for a color TFT lcd screen. Like the Leonardo board the Esplora use an Atmega32U4 AVR microcontroller with 16 MHz crystal oscillator and a micro USB connection capable to act as a USB client device such as a mouse or a keyboard. In the upper left corner of the board there is the reset push-button, that you can use to restart the board and four leds labelled as:

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preceding boards in that it provides a number of built-in, ready-to-use setof onboard sensors for interaction.

The Esplora has onboard sound and light output interfaces. It alos has the potential to expand its capabilities with two Tinkerkit input and output connectors, and a socket for a color TFT LCD screen.

Like the Leonardo board, the Esplora uses an Atmega32U4 AVR microcontroller with 16 MHz crystal oscillator and a micro USB connection capable of acting as a USB client device, like a mouse or a keyboard.

In the upper left corner of the board there is a reset pushbutton, that you can use to restart the board. There are four status LEDS :

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  • L [green] used defined led connected directrly to the microcontroller accessible as pin number 13
  • RX and TX [yellow] indicates the status of the USB communication
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  • L [yellow] connected directly to the microcontroller, accessible through pin 13
  • RX and TX [yellow] indicates the data being transmitted or received over the USB communication
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The Esplora has built-in USB communication, therefore it can appear to a connected computer as a mouse and keyboard, in addition to a virtual (CDC) serial / COM port. It also has other implications for the behavior of the board;

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The Esplora has built-in USB communication; it can appear to a connected computer as a mouse or keyboard, in addition to a virtual (CDC) serial / COM port. This has other implications for the behavior of the board;

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The design of the Esplora board recalls the old school gamepad design with analog joystick to hold in the left hand and four pushbuttons to hold with the right hand. In facts it is a fully programmable Arduino board equipped with the following devices:

  • Analog joystick with central push-button positioned on the left side, it has two axis (X and Y) and push-button readings.
  • 4 push-buttons laid out like a romboid.
  • Linear potentiometer as a throttle-like control.
  • Microphone for getting the environment's audio level.
  • Light sensor for getting the environment's lighting condition.
  • Temperature sensor.
  • Three-axis accelerometer.
  • Buzzer with square-wave sound capabilities.
  • RGB led super bright.
  • 2 TinkerKit Inputs to connect the TinkerKit sensors modules with the 3-pin connectors.
  • 2 TinkerKit Outputs to connect the TinkerKit actuators modules with the 3-pin connectors.
  • TFT display connector in a connector for an optional color LCD screen, an SD card or other devices using this protocol.

In order to cope with the number of available inputs, the board uses an analog multiplexer so that a single analog input of the microcontroller is shared among all the input channels (except the 3-axis accelerometer). Four additional microcontroller pins allow to choose which channel to read.

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The design of the Esplora board recalls traditional gamepad design with an analog joystick on the left and four pushbuttons on the right.

The Esplora has the following on-board inputs and outputs :

  • Analog joystick with central push-button two axis (X and Y) and a center pushbutton.
  • 4 push-buttons laid out in a diamond pattern.
  • Linear potentiometer slider near the bottom of the board.
  • Microphone for getting the loudness (amplitude) of the surrounding environment.
  • Light sensor for getting the brightness.
  • Temperature sensor reads the ambient temperature
  • Three-axis accelerometer measures the board's relation to gravity on three axes (X, Y, and Z)
  • Buzzer can produce square-waves.
  • RGB led bright LED with Red Green and Blue elements for color mixing.
  • 2 TinkerKit Inputs to connect the TinkerKit sensor modules with the 3-pin connectors.
  • 2 TinkerKit Outputs to connect the TinkerKit actuator modules with the 3-pin connectors.
  • TFT display connector connector for an optional color LCD screen, SD card, or other devices that use the SPI protocol.

In order to utilize the total number of available sensors, the board uses an analog multiplexer. This means a single analog input of the microcontroller is shared among all the input channels (except the 3-axis accelerometer). Four additional microcontroller pins choose which channel to read.

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As the Leonardo the Esplora has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. The ATmega32U4 provides serial (CDC) communication over USB and appears as a virtual com port to software on the computer. The chip also acts as a full speed USB 2.0 device, using standard USB COM drivers. On Windows, a .inf file is required. The Arduino software includes a serial monitor which allows simple textual data to be sent to and from the Arduino board. The RX and TX LEDs on the board will flash when data is being transmitted via the USB connection to the computer. The ATmega32U4 also supports SPI communication, that can be used through the SPI library. The Esplora appears as a generic keyboard and mouse, and can be programmed to control these input devices using the Keyboard and Mouse classes.

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The Leonardo the Esplora has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. The ATmega32U4 provides serial (CDC) communication over USB and appears as a virtual com port to software on the computer. The chip also acts as a full speed USB 2.0 device, using standard USB COM drivers. On Windows, a .inf file is required. The Arduino software includes a serial monitor which allows simple textual data to be sent to and from the Arduino board. The RX and TX LEDs on the board will flash when data is being transmitted via the USB connection to the computer.

The ATmega32U4 also supports SPI communication, that can be accessed through the SPI library.

The Esplora can appear as a generic keyboard and mouse, and can be programmed to control these input devices using the Keyboard and Mouse libraries.

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The Esplora can be programmed with the Arduino software (download). Select "Arduino Esplora" from the Tools > Board menu. For details, see the reference and tutorials.

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The Esplora can be programmed with the Arduino software (download). Select "Arduino Esplora" from the Tools > Board menu. For details, see the getting started page?.

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You can also bypass the bootloader and program the microcontroller through the ICSP (In-Circuit Serial Programming) header; see these instructions for details.

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You can also bypass the bootloader and program the microcontroller through the ICSP (In-Circuit Serial Programming) header; see these instructions for details.

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To facilitate the sketch writing the Esplora comes with a library that contains a dedicated family of instructionts to read all the sensors and write on all the ouputs that the boards provide. The library offers low level methods that just ouputs the raw data read from the sensors or write to the actuators, and also high level methods which provides ready processed data, like for example getting the temperature in Fahrenheit or Celsius degrees or writing directly the colour to the RGB led. Visit the Esplora reference page to see the complete documentation of the library and the examples.

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To facilitate writing sketches for the Esplora, there is a dedicated library that contains methods for reading the sensors and writing to the outputs on-board.

The library offers high level methods which provide pre-processed data, like degrees Fahrenheit or Celsius from the temperature sensor. It also enables easy access to the outputs, like writing values to the RGB LED.

Visit the Esplora reference page to see the complete documentation of the library and examples.

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December 07, 2012, at 12:39 PM by Federico -
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Visit the Reference page to see the complete documentation of the library and the examples.

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Visit the Esplora reference page to see the complete documentation of the library and the examples.

December 06, 2012, at 12:56 PM by Federico -
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EAGLE files: arduino-esplora-reference-design.zip
Schematic: arduino-esplora-schematic-rev3b.pdf

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December 05, 2012, at 07:17 PM by Federico -
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December 05, 2012, at 05:19 PM by Katia De Coi -
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Overview

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Overview

December 05, 2012, at 05:11 PM by Katia De Coi -
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December 05, 2012, at 05:07 PM by Katia De Coi -
December 05, 2012, at 05:05 PM by Katia De Coi -
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http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8069/8209014766_29799e2db6_o.jpg

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http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8069/8209014766_1b5a58e3c2_c.jpg

November 29, 2012, at 01:04 PM by Federico -
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preceding boards in that it provides a built-in, ready-to-use set of onboard

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preceding boards because it provides a built-in, ready-to-use set of onboard

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Like the Leonardo it has a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a micro USB connection, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable to get started.

The Esplora has built-in USB communication, therefore it can appear to a connected computer as a mouse and keyboard, in addition to a virtual (CDC)

to:

It also has an onboard sound and light output interfaces and the possibility to exapand the capabilities with two inputs and two output connectors and a socket for a color TFT lcd screen. Like the Leonardo board the Esplora use an Atmega32U4 AVR microcontroller with 16 MHz crystal oscillator and a micro USB connection capable to act as a USB client device such as a mouse or a keyboard. In the upper left corner of the board there is the reset push-button, that you can use to restart the board and four leds labelled as:

  • ON [green] indicates whether the board is receiving power supply
  • L [green] used defined led connected directrly to the microcontroller accessible as pin number 13
  • RX and TX [yellow] indicates the status of the USB communication

The board contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable to get started.

The Esplora has built-in USB communication, therefore it can appear to a connected computer as a mouse and keyboard, in addition to a virtual (CDC)

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Flash Memory256 KB of which 8 KB used by bootloader
SRAM8 KB
EEPROM4 KB
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Flash Memory32 KB of which 4 KB used by bootloader
SRAM2.5 KB
EEPROM1 KB
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The Esplora board can be held like a gamepad and is equipped with the following devices:

  • Analog joystick with push button on the left side, with X/Y and push button readings.
  • 4 push buttons laid out like a romboid.
to:

The design of the Esplora board recalls the old school gamepad design with analog joystick to hold in the left hand and four pushbuttons to hold with the right hand. In facts it is a fully programmable Arduino board equipped with the following devices:

  • Analog joystick with central push-button positioned on the left side, it has two axis (X and Y) and push-button readings.
  • 4 push-buttons laid out like a romboid.
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  • RGB led
  • 2 digital I/O pins available through TinkerKit 3-pin connectors, that can be used either as digital input or outputs.
  • 2 analog inputs available through TinkerKit 3-pin connectors.
  • SPI/TWI in a connector for an optional color LCD screen, an SD card or other devices using this protocol.

In order to cope with the number of available inputs, the board uses an analog multiplexer so that a single analog input of the microcontroller is shared

to:
  • RGB led super bright.
  • 2 TinkerKit Inputs to connect the TinkerKit sensors modules with the 3-pin connectors.
  • 2 TinkerKit Outputs to connect the TinkerKit actuators modules with the 3-pin connectors.
  • TFT display connector in a connector for an optional color LCD screen, an SD card or other devices using this protocol.

In order to cope with the number of available inputs, the board uses an analog multiplexer so that a single analog input of the microcontroller is shared

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Esplora Library

To facilitate the sketch writing the Esplora comes with a library that contains a dedicated family of instructionts to read all the sensors and write on all the ouputs that the boards provide. The library offers low level methods that just ouputs the raw data read from the sensors or write to the actuators, and also high level methods which provides ready processed data, like for example getting the temperature in Fahrenheit or Celsius degrees or writing directly the colour to the RGB led. Visit the Reference page to see the complete documentation of the library and the examples.

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The Leonardo has a resettable polyfuse that protects your computer's USB ports from shorts and overcurrent. Although most computers provide their own internal protection, the fuse provides an extra layer of protection. If more than 500 mA is applied to the USB port, the fuse will automatically break the connection until the short or overload is removed.

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The Esplora has a resettable polyfuse that protects your computer's USB ports from shorts and overcurrent. Although most computers provide their own internal protection, the fuse provides an extra layer of protection. If more than 500 mA is applied to the USB port, the fuse will automatically break the connection until the short or overload is removed.

November 22, 2012, at 04:53 PM by Katia De Coi -
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http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8069/8209014766_29799e2db6_o.jpg

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The maximum length and width of the Esplora PCB are 6.5 and 2.4 inches respectively, with the USB and TinkerKit connectors extending beyond the latter dimension. Four screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case.

to:

The maximum length and width of the Esplora PCB are 6.5 and 2.4 inches respectively, with the USB and TinkerKit connectors extending beyond the latter dimension. Four screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case.

November 02, 2012, at 10:30 PM by Davide Gomba -
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