Main.ArduinoBoardEthernet History

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April 29, 2013, at 11:53 AM by Alberto Cicchi -
Changed line 50 from:
||Arduino Pins reserved:
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||Arduino Pins reserved: ||
April 29, 2013, at 11:52 AM by Alberto Cicchi -
Changed line 50 from:
||Arduino Pins reserved: ||
to:
||Arduino Pins reserved:
April 29, 2013, at 11:52 AM by Alberto Cicchi -
Changed lines 50-53 from:
||[--''Arduino Pins reserved:''--] ||
|| ||[--''10 to 13 used for SPI''--] ||
|| ||[--''4 used for SD card''--] ||
|| ||[--''2 W5100 interrupt (when bridged)''--] ||
to:
||Arduino Pins reserved: ||
|| ||10 to 13 used for SPI ||
|| ||4 used for SD card ||
|| ||2 W5100 interrupt (when bridged) ||
April 29, 2013, at 11:50 AM by Alberto Cicchi -
Changed lines 6-7 from:
(:cellnr:)''Arduino Ethernet board front view''
(:cell:)''Arduino Ethernet board rear view''
to:
(:cellnr:)''Arduino Ethernet Rev. 3 board front view''
(:cell:)''Arduino Ethernet Rev. 3 board rear view''
Changed line 9 from:
(:cellnr:)''Arduino Ethernet board front view with optional PoE module''
to:
(:cellnr:)''Arduino Ethernet Rev. 2 board front view with optional PoE module''
April 29, 2013, at 11:31 AM by Alberto Cicchi -
Changed lines 67-70 from:
EAGLE files: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-R3-reference-design.zip | arduino-ethernet-R3-reference-design.zip ]]

Schematic: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-R3-schematic.pdf | arduino-ethernet-R3-schematic.pdf ]]
to:
EAGLE files: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-R3-reference-design.zip | Arduino-ethernet-R3-reference-design.zip ]]

Schematic: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-R3-schematic.pdf | Arduino-ethernet-R3-schematic.pdf ]]
January 28, 2013, at 07:45 PM by Federico -
Changed lines 39-40 from:
* the IOREF that allow the shields to adapt to the voltage provided from the board. Shields that use the IOREF pin will be compatible both with the board that use the AVR, which operate with 5V and with the Arduino Due that operate with 3.3V. The second one is a not connected pin, that is reserved for future purposes.
to:
* the IOREF that allow the shields to adapt to the voltage provided from the board. Shields that use the IOREF pin will be compatible both with the board that use the AVR, which operate with 5V and with the Arduino Due that operate with 3.3V. Next to the IOREF pin there is a not connected pin, that is reserved for future purposes.
Added lines 88-89:
* '''IOREF.''' This pin on the Arduino board provides the voltage reference with which the microcontroller operates. A properly configured shield can read the IOREF pin voltage and select the appropriate power source or enable voltage translators on the outputs for working with the 5V or 3.3V.
January 28, 2013, at 07:33 PM by Federico -
Added lines 36-40:

The {+Revision 3+} of the board introduces the standardized 1.0 pinout, that consist in:
* added SDA and SCL pins that are near to the AREF pin and two other new pins placed near to the RESET pin, this will the opportunity to shield that use i2c or TWI components to be compatible with all the Arduino boards;
* the IOREF that allow the shields to adapt to the voltage provided from the board. Shields that use the IOREF pin will be compatible both with the board that use the AVR, which operate with 5V and with the Arduino Due that operate with 3.3V. The second one is a not connected pin, that is reserved for future purposes.
Changed lines 67-70 from:
EAGLE files: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-reference-design.zip | arduino-ethernet-reference-design.zip ]]

Schematic: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-schematic.pdf | arduino-ethernet-schematic.pdf ]]
to:
EAGLE files: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-R3-reference-design.zip | arduino-ethernet-R3-reference-design.zip ]]

Schematic: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-R3-schematic.pdf | arduino-ethernet-R3-schematic.pdf ]]
November 23, 2012, at 05:15 PM by Roberto Guido - added comments box on bottom
Changed lines 156-158 from:
If you want to use a FTDI cable to download your sketches on the Arduino Ethernet, please refer to this guide: [[ http://scuola.arduino.cc/en/content/upgrade-arduino-ethernet-bootloader-latest-version | Upgrade the Arduino Ethernet bootloader to the latest version]]
to:
If you want to use a FTDI cable to download your sketches on the Arduino Ethernet, please refer to this guide: [[ http://scuola.arduino.cc/en/content/upgrade-arduino-ethernet-bootloader-latest-version | Upgrade the Arduino Ethernet bootloader to the latest version]]

(:div id='commentsbox':)
June 01, 2012, at 03:33 PM by Federico -
Changed line 16 from:
[[http://store.arduino.cc/ww/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=11_12&products_id=141 | Attach:buttonStore.jpg ]]
to:
[[http://store.arduino.cc/ww/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=11_12&products_id=142 | Attach:buttonStore.jpg ]]
June 01, 2012, at 03:32 PM by Federico -
Changed line 16 from:
[[http://store.arduino.cc/eu/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=11_12&products_id=142 | Attach:buttonStore.jpg ]]
to:
[[http://store.arduino.cc/ww/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=11_12&products_id=141 | Attach:buttonStore.jpg ]]
May 28, 2012, at 12:09 AM by David A. Mellis - Removing boards.txt section (its included now).
Deleted lines 155-162:
With this board you need to change the boards.txt file in your Arduino directory (find it in: ''"Arduino-00xx > hardware > arduino"'') with this updated version that include also the Mega ADK board:

||border=1 style="border-collapse:collapse" cellpadding=5 width=40%
||Arduino 0022 or older ||[[Attach:boards.txt.zip | boards.txt]] ||
||Arduino 1.0 Beta ||[[Attach:boards1.0.txt.zip | boards1.0.txt]] ||

[To be downladed, this files are compressed into a zip archive, so you need to unzip them into the directory described above.]
April 16, 2012, at 07:41 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 41-42 from:
||Input Voltage Plug(limits) ||6-18V ||
to:
||Input Voltage Plug (recommended) ||7-12V ||
||Input Voltage Plug (limits) ||6-20V ||
April 16, 2012, at 07:37 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 76-77 from:
* '''5V.''' The regulated power supply used to power the microcontroller and other components on the board. This can come either from VIN via an on-board regulator, or be supplied by USB or another regulated 5V supply.
to:
* '''5V.''' This pin outputs a regulated 5V from the regulator on the board. The board can be supplied with power either from the DC power jack (7 - 12V), the USB connector (5V), or the VIN pin of the board (7-12V). Supplying voltage via the 5V or 3.3V pins bypasses the regulator, and can damage your board. We don't advise it.
Changed line 163 from:
If you want to use a FTDI cable to download your sketches on the Arduino Ethernet, please refer to this guide: [[ http://scuola.arduino.cc/en/content/upgrade-arduino-ethernet-bootloader-latest-version | Upgrade the Arduino Ethernet bootloader to the latest version]]
to:
If you want to use a FTDI cable to download your sketches on the Arduino Ethernet, please refer to this guide: [[ http://scuola.arduino.cc/en/content/upgrade-arduino-ethernet-bootloader-latest-version | Upgrade the Arduino Ethernet bootloader to the latest version]]
November 28, 2011, at 08:54 AM by Federico -
Changed lines 34-35 from:
The 6-pin serial programming header is compatible with the[[/Main/USBSerial | USB Serial]] adapter and also with the FTDI USB cables or Sparkfun and Adafruit FTDI-style basic USB-to-serial breakout boards. It features support for automatic reset, allowing sketches to be uploaded without pressing the reset button on the board. When plugged into a USB to Serial adapter, the Arduino Ethernet is powered from the adapter.
to:
The 6-pin serial programming header is compatible with the [[/Main/USBSerial | USB Serial]] adapter and also with the FTDI USB cables or with Sparkfun and Adafruit FTDI-style basic USB-to-serial breakout boards. It features support for automatic reset, allowing sketches to be uploaded without pressing the reset button on the board. When plugged into a USB to Serial adapter, the Arduino Ethernet is powered from the adapter.
Changed lines 61-64 from:
EAGLE files: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-reference-design.zip | arduino-ethernet-reference-design.zip]]

Schematic: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-schematic.pdf | arduino-ethernet-schematic.pdf]]
to:
EAGLE files: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-reference-design.zip | arduino-ethernet-reference-design.zip ]]

Schematic: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-schematic.pdf | arduino-ethernet-schematic.pdf ]]
November 28, 2011, at 08:49 AM by Federico -
Changed lines 34-35 from:
A six pin header can be connected to an FTDI cable or [[/Main/USBSerial | USB Serial]] board to provide USB power and communication to the board.
to:
The 6-pin serial programming header is compatible with the[[/Main/USBSerial | USB Serial]] adapter and also with the FTDI USB cables or Sparkfun and Adafruit FTDI-style basic USB-to-serial breakout boards. It features support for automatic reset, allowing sketches to be uploaded without pressing the reset button on the board. When plugged into a USB to Serial adapter, the Arduino Ethernet is powered from the adapter.
October 03, 2011, at 02:55 PM by Federico -
Changed lines 4-5 from:
(:cell:)%centre%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetFront.jpg |Attach:ArduinoEthernetFront450px.jpg]]
(:cell:)%centre%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetBack.jpg |Attach:ArduinoEthernetBack450px.jpg]]
to:
(:cell:)%centre%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetFront.jpg | Attach:ArduinoEthernetFront450px.jpg ]]
(:cell:)%centre%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetBack.jpg | Attach:ArduinoEthernetBack450px.jpg ]]
Changed line 8 from:
(:cellnr:)%centre%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE.jpg|Attach:ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE450px.jpg]]
to:
(:cellnr:)%centre%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE.jpg | Attach:ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE450px.jpg ]]
Changed line 14 from:
[[http://store.arduino.cc/eu/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=11_12&products_id=141 | Attach:buttonStore.jpg]]
to:
[[http://store.arduino.cc/eu/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=11_12&products_id=141 | Attach:buttonStore.jpg ]]
Changed line 16 from:
[[http://store.arduino.cc/eu/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=11_12&products_id=142 | Attach:buttonStore.jpg]]
to:
[[http://store.arduino.cc/eu/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=11_12&products_id=142 | Attach:buttonStore.jpg ]]
Changed line 18 from:
[[http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Buy | Attach:buttonDistributors.jpg]]
to:
[[http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Buy | Attach:buttonDistributors.jpg ]]
September 17, 2011, at 02:02 PM by Scott Fitzgerald - mirror dev
Changed lines 3-12 from:
%height=400%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetFront.jpg |Attach:ArduinoEthernetFront.jpg]]
''Arduino Ethernet board front view''

%height=400%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetBack.jpg |Attach:ArduinoEthernetBack.jpg]]
''Arduino Ethernet board rear view''

%height=400%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE.jpg|Attach:ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE.jpg]]
''Arduino Ethernet board front view with optional PoE module''

to:
(:table border=0 :)
(:cell:)%centre%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetFront.jpg |Attach:ArduinoEthernetFront450px.jpg]]
(:cell:)%centre%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetBack.jpg |Attach:ArduinoEthernetBack450px.jpg]]
(:cellnr:)''Arduino Ethernet board front view''
(:cell:)''Arduino Ethernet board rear view''
(:cellnr:)%centre%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE.jpg|Attach:ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE450px.jpg]]
(:cellnr:)''Arduino Ethernet board front view with optional PoE module''
(:tableend:)

(:table border = 0 :)
(:cell:)w/o POE module
[[http://store.arduino.cc/eu/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=11_12&products_id=141 | Attach:buttonStore.jpg]]
(:cell:)with POE module
[[http://store.arduino.cc/eu/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=11_12&products_id=142 | Attach:buttonStore.jpg]]
(:cell:)\\
[[http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Buy | Attach:buttonDistributors.jpg]]
(:tableend:)

Changed lines 41-42 from:
||Input Voltage PLUG (limits) ||6-18V ||
||Input Voltage (PoE) ||36-57V ||
to:
||Input Voltage Plug(limits) ||6-18V ||
||Input Voltage PoE (limits) ||36-57V ||
Changed lines 44-47 from:
*Arduino Pins reserved
**10 to 13 used for SPI
**4 used for SD card
**2 W5100 interrupt (when bridged)
to:
||[--''Arduino Pins reserved:''--] ||
|| ||[--''10 to 13 used for SPI''--] ||
|| ||[--''4 used for SD card''--] ||
|| ||[--''2 W5100 interrupt (when bridged)''--] ||
Changed lines 155-163 from:
With this board you need to change the boards.txt file in your Arduino directory (find it in: Arduino-00xx->hardware->arduino) with this updated version that include also the Mega ADK board: [[Attach:boards.txt | boards.txt]]
to:
With this board you need to change the boards.txt file in your Arduino directory (find it in: ''"Arduino-00xx > hardware > arduino"'') with this updated version that include also the Mega ADK board:

||border=1 style="border-collapse:collapse" cellpadding=5 width=40%
||Arduino 0022 or older ||[[Attach:boards.txt.zip | boards.txt]] ||
||Arduino 1.0 Beta ||[[Attach:boards1.0.txt.zip | boards1.0.txt]] ||

[To be downladed, this files are compressed into a zip archive, so you need to unzip them into the directory described above.]

If you want to use a FTDI cable to download your sketches on the Arduino Ethernet, please refer to this guide: [[ http://scuola.arduino.cc/en/content/upgrade-arduino-ethernet-bootloader-latest-version | Upgrade the Arduino Ethernet bootloader to the latest version]]
September 12, 2011, at 03:34 AM by Scott Fitzgerald - fixed voltage requirements
Changed lines 32-33 from:
||Input Voltage (recommended) ||7-12V ||
||Input Voltage (limits) ||6-20V ||
to:
||Input Voltage PLUG (limits) ||6-18V ||
||Input Voltage (PoE) ||36-57V ||
September 01, 2011, at 05:02 PM by Tom Igoe -
Changed lines 104-105 from:
* '''LED: 13.''' There is a built-in LED connected to digital pin 13. When the pin is HIGH value, the LED is on, when the pin is LOW, it's off.
to:
* '''LED: 9.''' There is a built-in LED connected to digital pin 9. When the pin is HIGH value, the LED is on, when the pin is LOW, it's off. On most other arduino boards, this LED is found on pin 13. It is on pin 9 on the Ethernet board because pin 13 is used as part of the SPI connection.
July 13, 2011, at 03:44 PM by David Cuartielles -
Added lines 143-146:

!!!Setup

With this board you need to change the boards.txt file in your Arduino directory (find it in: Arduino-00xx->hardware->arduino) with this updated version that include also the Mega ADK board: [[Attach:boards.txt | boards.txt]]
July 13, 2011, at 10:44 AM by Federico -
Changed lines 4-5 from:
Arduino Ethernet board front view
to:
''Arduino Ethernet board front view''
Changed lines 7-13 from:
Arduino Ethernet board rear view

%height=400%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE.jpg
|ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE.jpg]]
Arduino Ethernet board front view with optional PoE module

to:
''Arduino Ethernet board rear view''

%height=400%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE.jpg|Attach:ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE.jpg]]
''Arduino Ethernet board front view with optional PoE module''

July 13, 2011, at 10:43 AM by Federico -
Changed line 35 from:
||Digital I/O Pins ||9 (of which 4 provide PWM output) ||
to:
||Digital I/O Pins ||14 (of which 4 provide PWM output) ||
July 12, 2011, at 04:24 PM by Federico -
Changed lines 117-118 from:
See also the [[Hacking/PinMapping328 | mapping between Arduino pins and ATmega328 ports]].
to:
See also the [[http://arduino.cc/en/Hacking/PinMapping168 | mapping between Arduino pins and ATmega328 ports]].
July 12, 2011, at 05:19 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 4-5 from:
to:
Arduino Ethernet board front view
Changed lines 7-13 from:
to:
Arduino Ethernet board rear view

%height=400%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE.jpg
|ArduinoEthernetFrontPOE.jpg]]
Arduino Ethernet board front view with optional PoE module

July 11, 2011, at 02:35 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
July 11, 2011, at 02:32 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 17-18 from:
An onboard microSD card reader, which can be used to store files for serving over the network, is accessible through the SD Library. When working with this library, SS is on Pin 4.
to:
An onboard microSD card reader, which can be used to store files for serving over the network, is accessible through the SD Library. Pin 10 is reserved for the Wiznet interface, SS for the SD card is on Pin 4.
Changed lines 94-97 from:
* '''PWM: 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, and 11.''' Provide 8-bit PWM output with the [[Reference/AnalogWrite | analogWrite()]] function.

* '''SPI: 10 (SS), 11 (MOSI), 12 (MISO), 13 (SCK).''' These pins support SPI communication using the [[Reference/SPI | SPI library]].
to:
* '''PWM: 3, 5, 6, 9, and 10.''' Provide 8-bit PWM output with the [[Reference/AnalogWrite | analogWrite()]] function.

* '''SPI: 10 (SS), 11 (MOSI), 12 (MISO), 13 (SCK).''' These pins support SPI communication using the [[Reference/SPI | SPI library]].
July 11, 2011, at 02:30 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 9-10 from:
The Arduino Ethernet is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc8161.pdf | datasheet]]). It has 14 digital input/output pins (up to 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a RJ45 connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button.
to:
The Arduino Ethernet is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc8161.pdf | datasheet]]). It has 14 digital input/output pins, 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a RJ45 connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button.

''NB: Pins 10, 11, 12 and 13 are reserved for interfacing with the Ethernet module and should not be used otherwise. This reduces the number of available pins to 9, with 4 available as PWM outputs.''

An optional Power over Ethernet module can be added to the board as well.
Added lines 17-18:
An onboard microSD card reader, which can be used to store files for serving over the network, is accessible through the SD Library. When working with this library, SS is on Pin 4.
Changed line 29 from:
*Arduino Pins Used
to:
*Arduino Pins reserved
Changed lines 51-66 from:

The Arduino Ethernet Board can be powered via an external power supply, an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) module, or by using a FTDI cable/USB Serial connector.

The current board has an optional PoE module designed to extract power from a conventional twisted pair Category 5 Ethernet cable:
*IEEE802.3af compliant
*Low output ripple and noise (100mVpp)
*Input voltage range 36V to 57V
*Overload and short-circuit protection
*9V Output
*High efficiency DC/DC converter: typ 75% @ 50% load
*1500V isolation (input to output)

''NB: the Power over Ethernet module is proprietary hardware not made by Arduino, it is a third party accessory. For more information, see the [[Attach:PoE-datasheet.pdf | datasheet]]''

When using the power adapter, power can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the board's power jack. Leads from a battery can be inserted in the Gnd and Vin pin headers of the POWER connector.
to:
The board can also be powered via an external power supply, an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) module, or by using a FTDI cable/USB Serial connector.

External power can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the board's power jack. Leads from a battery can be inserted in the Gnd and Vin pin headers of the POWER connector.
Added lines 57-81:
The power pins are as follows:

* '''VIN.''' The input voltage to the Arduino board when it's using an external power source (as opposed to 5 volts from the USB connection or other regulated power source). You can supply voltage through this pin, or, if supplying voltage via the power jack, access it through this pin.

* '''5V.''' The regulated power supply used to power the microcontroller and other components on the board. This can come either from VIN via an on-board regulator, or be supplied by USB or another regulated 5V supply.

* '''3V3.''' A 3.3 volt supply generated by the on-board regulator. Maximum current draw is 50 mA.

* '''GND.''' Ground pins.

The optional PoE module is designed to extract power from a conventional twisted pair Category 5 Ethernet cable:
*IEEE802.3af compliant
*Low output ripple and noise (100mVpp)
*Input voltage range 36V to 57V
*Overload and short-circuit protection
*9V Output
*High efficiency DC/DC converter: typ 75% @ 50% load
*1500V isolation (input to output)

''NB: the Power over Ethernet module is proprietary hardware not made by Arduino, it is a third party accessory. For more information, see the [[Attach:PoE-datasheet.pdf | datasheet]]''

When using the power adapter, power can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the board's power jack. Leads from a battery can be inserted in the Gnd and Vin pin headers of the POWER connector.

The board can operate on an external supply of 6 to 20 volts. If supplied with less than 7V, however, the 5V pin may supply less than five volts and the board may be unstable. If using more than 12V, the voltage regulator may overheat and damage the board. The recommended range is 7 to 12 volts.
Added lines 86-111:
!!!Input and Output

Each of the 14 digital pins on the Ethernet board can be used as an input or output, using [[Reference/PinMode | pinMode()]], [[Reference/DigitalWrite | digitalWrite()]], and [[Reference/DigitalRead | digitalRead()]] functions. They operate at 5 volts. Each pin can provide or receive a maximum of 40 mA and has an internal pull-up resistor (disconnected by default) of 20-50 kOhms. In addition, some pins have specialized functions:

* '''Serial: 0 (RX) and 1 (TX).''' Used to receive (RX) and transmit (TX) TTL serial data.

* '''External Interrupts: 2 and 3.''' These pins can be configured to trigger an interrupt on a low value, a rising or falling edge, or a change in value. See the [[Reference/AttachInterrupt | attachInterrupt()]] function for details.

* '''PWM: 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, and 11.''' Provide 8-bit PWM output with the [[Reference/AnalogWrite | analogWrite()]] function.

* '''SPI: 10 (SS), 11 (MOSI), 12 (MISO), 13 (SCK).''' These pins support SPI communication using the [[Reference/SPI | SPI library]].

* '''LED: 13.''' There is a built-in LED connected to digital pin 13. When the pin is HIGH value, the LED is on, when the pin is LOW, it's off.

The Ethernet board has 6 analog inputs, labeled A0 through A5, each of which provide 10 bits of resolution (i.e. 1024 different values). By default they measure from ground to 5 volts, though is it possible to change the upper end of their range using the AREF pin and the [[Reference/AnalogReference | analogReference]]() function. Additionally, some pins have specialized functionality:

* '''TWI: A4 (SDA) and A5 (SCL).''' Support TWI communication using the [[Reference/Wire| Wire library]].

There are a couple of other pins on the board:

* '''AREF.''' Reference voltage for the analog inputs. Used with [[Reference/AnalogReference | analogReference]]().

* '''Reset.''' Bring this line LOW to reset the microcontroller. Typically used to add a reset button to shields which block the one on the board.

See also the [[Hacking/PinMapping328 | mapping between Arduino pins and ATmega328 ports]].
Changed lines 118-119 from:
The ATmega328 also supports I2C (TWI) and SPI communication. The Arduino software includes a Wire library to simplify use of the I2C bus; see the [[Reference/Wire | documentation]] for details. For SPI communication, use the [[Reference/SPI | SPI library]].
to:
The ATmega328 also supports TWI and SPI communication. The Arduino software includes a Wire library to simplify use of the TWI bus; see the [[Reference/Wire | documentation]] for details. For SPI communication, use the [[Reference/SPI | SPI library]].
Changed lines 132-133 from:
All the Ethernet example sketches work as they do with the Ethernet shield. Make sure to change your network settings for your network.
to:
All the Ethernet example sketches work as they do with the Ethernet shield. Make sure to change the network settings for your network.
July 09, 2011, at 06:16 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 9-10 from:
The Arduino Ethernet is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc8161.pdf | datasheet]]). It has 14 digital input/output pins (of which 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a RJ45 connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button.
to:
The Arduino Ethernet is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc8161.pdf | datasheet]]). It has 14 digital input/output pins (up to 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a RJ45 connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button.
Changed line 26 from:
**2 W5100 interrupt
to:
**2 W5100 interrupt (when bridged)
Changed lines 46-48 from:
The Arduino Ethernet can be powered via an external power supply, an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) module, or by using a FTDI cable/USB Serial connector.

The current shield has a (Power over Ethernet) PoE module designed to extract power from a conventional twisted pair Category 5 Ethernet cable:
to:
The Arduino Ethernet Board can be powered via an external power supply, an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) module, or by using a FTDI cable/USB Serial connector.

The current board has an optional PoE module designed to extract power from a conventional twisted pair Category 5 Ethernet cable:
Added lines 57-58:
''NB: the Power over Ethernet module is proprietary hardware not made by Arduino, it is a third party accessory. For more information, see the [[Attach:PoE-datasheet.pdf | datasheet]]''
June 27, 2011, at 03:25 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 83-84 from:
You can also program the Ethernet boardwith an external programmer like an AVRISP mkII or USBTinyISP. To set up your environment for burning a sketch with a programmer, follow [[Hacking/Programmer | these instructions]]. This will delete the serial bootloader, however.
to:
You can also program the Ethernet board with an external programmer like an AVRISP mkII or USBTinyISP. To set up your environment for burning a sketch with a programmer, follow [[Hacking/Programmer | these instructions]]. This will delete the serial bootloader, however.
June 24, 2011, at 03:51 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
The Ethernet differs from other boards in that it does not have an onboard USB-to-serial driver chip, but has a Wiznet Ethernet interface. This is the same interface found on the Ethernet shield. A six pin header can be connected to an FTDI cable or [[/Main/USBSerial | USB Serial]] board to provide USB power and communication to the board.
to:
The Ethernet differs from other boards in that it does not have an onboard USB-to-serial driver chip, but has a Wiznet Ethernet interface. This is the same interface found on the Ethernet shield.

A six pin header can be connected to an FTDI cable or [[/Main/USBSerial | USB Serial]] board to provide USB power and communication to the board.
June 23, 2011, at 01:28 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 9-12 from:
The Arduino Ethernet is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc8161.pdf | datasheet]]). It has 14 digital input/output pins (of which 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a RJ45 connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button. A six pin header can be connected to an FTDI cable or Sparkfun breakout board to provide USB power and communication to the board.

The Ethernet differs from other boards in that it does not have an onboard USB-to-serial driver chip, but has a Wiznet Ethernet interface. This is the same interface found on the Ethernet shield.
to:
The Arduino Ethernet is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc8161.pdf | datasheet]]). It has 14 digital input/output pins (of which 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a RJ45 connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button.

The Ethernet differs from other boards in that it does not have an onboard USB-to-serial driver chip, but has a Wiznet Ethernet interface. This is the same interface found on the Ethernet shield. A six pin header can be connected to an FTDI cable or [[/Main/USBSerial | USB Serial]] board to provide USB power and communication to the board.
June 11, 2011, at 01:06 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 44-45 from:
The Arduino Ethernet can be powered via an external power supply, an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) module, or by using a FTDI cable/Sparkfun breakout board.
to:
The Arduino Ethernet can be powered via an external power supply, an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) module, or by using a FTDI cable/USB Serial connector.
Changed lines 79-80 from:
The 6-pin serial programming header is compatible with FTDI USB cables and the Sparkfun and Adafruit FTDI-style basic USB-to-serial breakout boards. It features support for automatic reset, allowing sketches to be uploaded without pressing the reset button on the board. When plugged into a FTDI-style USB adapter, the Arduino Ethernet is powered off the adapter.
to:
The 6-pin serial programming header is compatible with FTDI USB cables and the Sparkfun and Adafruit FTDI-style basic USB-to-serial breakout boards including the Arduino USB-Serial connector. It features support for automatic reset, allowing sketches to be uploaded without pressing the reset button on the board. When plugged into a FTDI-style USB adapter, the Arduino Ethernet is powered off the adapter.
June 10, 2011, at 06:54 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 46-55 from:
The PoE module is designed to extract power from a conventional twisted pair Category 5 Ethernet cable:
||border=0
||IEEE802.3af compliant||
||Low output ripple and noise (100mVpp)||
||Input voltage range 36V to 57V||
||Overload and short-circuit protection||
||9V Output||
||High efficiency DC/DC converter: typ 75% @ 50% load||
||1500V isolation (input to output)||
to:
The current shield has a (Power over Ethernet) PoE module designed to extract power from a conventional twisted pair Category 5 Ethernet cable:
*IEEE802.3af compliant
*Low output ripple and noise (100mVpp)
*Input voltage range 36V to 57V
*Overload and short-circuit protection
*9V Output
*High efficiency DC/DC converter: typ 75% @ 50% load
*1500V isolation (input to output)
April 13, 2011, at 05:45 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 9-12 from:
The Arduino Ethernet is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc8161.pdf | datasheet]]). It has 14 digital input/output pins (of which 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a RJ45 connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button.

The Ethernet differs from all preceding boards in that it does not use a USB-to-serial driver chip, but has a Wiznet Ethernet interface.
to:
The Arduino Ethernet is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc8161.pdf | datasheet]]). It has 14 digital input/output pins (of which 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a RJ45 connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button. A six pin header can be connected to an FTDI cable or Sparkfun breakout board to provide USB power and communication to the board.

The Ethernet differs from other boards in that it does not have an onboard USB-to-serial driver chip, but has a Wiznet Ethernet interface. This is the same interface found on the Ethernet shield.
Changed lines 44-45 from:
The Arduino Ethernet can be powered via an external power supply, or by an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) module.
to:
The Arduino Ethernet can be powered via an external power supply, an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) module, or by using a FTDI cable/Sparkfun breakout board.
April 13, 2011, at 02:56 PM by Tom Igoe -
Changed lines 78-81 from:
It is possible to program the Arduino Ethernet board in two ways, with the 6 pin programming header, or with an external programmer.

The 6-pin programming header is compatible with FTDI USB cables and the Sparkfun FTDI Basic Breakout. It adds support for automatic reset, allowing sketches to be uploaded without pressing the reset button on the board. When plugged into a FTDI-style USB adapter, the Arduino Ethernet is powered off the adapter.
to:
It is possible to program the Arduino Ethernet board in two ways: through the 6 pin serial programming header, or with an external ISP programmer.

The 6-pin serial programming header is compatible with FTDI USB cables and the Sparkfun and Adafruit FTDI-style basic USB-to-serial breakout boards. It features support for automatic reset, allowing sketches to be uploaded without pressing the reset button on the board. When plugged into a FTDI-style USB adapter, the Arduino Ethernet is powered off the adapter.
April 13, 2011, at 02:53 PM by Tom Igoe -
Changed lines 82-87 from:
For use with an external programmer like an AVR-ISP or USBTinyISP. To set up your environment for burning a sketch with a programmer, follow [[Hacking/Programmer | these instructions]].

Once you have changed the upload.using parameter, open the Arduino IDE. You should select the Uno from the Board menu. No need to choose a serial port. Uploading works in the same fashion, it just takes a little longer than usual.

All the Ethernet example sketches work as expected, make sure your network settings are changed to reflect the board settings in the sketch.
to:
You can also program the Ethernet boardwith an external programmer like an AVRISP mkII or USBTinyISP. To set up your environment for burning a sketch with a programmer, follow [[Hacking/Programmer | these instructions]]. This will delete the serial bootloader, however.

All the Ethernet example sketches work as they do with the Ethernet shield. Make sure to change your network settings for your network.
April 12, 2011, at 07:40 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 32-35 from:
||W5100 TCP/IP Embedded Ethernet Controller
||Power Over Ethernet ready Magnetic Jack
||Micro SD card, with active voltage translators
to:
||W5100 TCP/IP Embedded Ethernet Controller||
||Power Over Ethernet ready Magnetic Jack||
||Micro SD card, with active voltage translators||
Changed lines 48-55 from:
||IEEE802.3af compliant
||Low output ripple and noise (100mVpp)
||Input voltage range 36V to 57V
||Overload and short-circuit protection
||9V Output
||High efficiency DC/DC converter: typ 75% @ 50% load
||1500V isolation (input to output)
to:
||IEEE802.3af compliant||
||Low output ripple and noise (100mVpp)||
||Input voltage range 36V to 57V||
||Overload and short-circuit protection||
||9V Output||
||High efficiency DC/DC converter: typ 75% @ 50% load||
||1500V isolation (input to output)||
April 12, 2011, at 07:38 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
The Ethernet differs from all preceding boards in that it does not use the FTDI USB-to-serial driver chip, but has a Wiznet Ethernet interface
to:
The Ethernet differs from all preceding boards in that it does not use a USB-to-serial driver chip, but has a Wiznet Ethernet interface.
Deleted line 35:
Changed lines 44-47 from:
The Arduino Ethernet can be powered via an external power supply, or by an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) Module.

Power can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the board's power jack. Leads from a battery can be inserted in the Gnd and Vin pin headers of the POWER connector.
to:
The Arduino Ethernet can be powered via an external power supply, or by an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) module.

The PoE module is designed to extract power from a conventional twisted pair Category 5 Ethernet cable:
||border=0
||IEEE802.3af compliant
||Low output ripple and noise (100mVpp)
||Input voltage range 36V to 57V
||Overload and short-circuit protection
||9V Output
||High efficiency DC/DC converter: typ 75% @ 50% load
||1500V isolation (input to output)

When using the power adapter, power can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the board's power jack. Leads from a battery can be inserted in the Gnd and Vin pin headers of the POWER connector.
Deleted line 63:
Changed lines 80-81 from:
The 6-pin programming header is compatible with FTDI USB cables and the Sparkfun FTDI Basic Breakout. It adds support for automatic reset, allowing sketches to be uploaded without pressing the reset button on the board.
to:
The 6-pin programming header is compatible with FTDI USB cables and the Sparkfun FTDI Basic Breakout. It adds support for automatic reset, allowing sketches to be uploaded without pressing the reset button on the board. When plugged into a FTDI-style USB adapter, the Arduino Ethernet is powered off the adapter.
Deleted lines 87-88:
The "new-extension" branch of the Arduino gitHub repository includes a feature that could simplify the uploading with an external programmer. Holding down the shift button changes the "Upolad" button to "Upload using programmer".
April 12, 2011, at 06:59 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 53-55 from:
The ATmega328 has 32 KB (with 0.5 KB used for the bootloader). It also has 2 KB of SRAM and 1 KB of EEPROM (which can be read and written with the [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Reference/EEPROM | EEPROM library]]).

to:
The ATmega328 has 32 KB (with 0.5 KB used for the bootloader). It also has 2 KB of SRAM and 1 KB of EEPROM (which can be read and written with the [[Reference/EEPROM | EEPROM library]]).

Changed lines 58-59 from:
The Arduino Ethernet has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. The ATmega328 provides UART TTL (5V) serial communication, which is available on digital pins 0 (RX) and 1 (TX).
to:
The Arduino Ethernet has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers.
April 12, 2011, at 06:58 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 64-65 from:
The board also can connect to a wired network via ethernet. When connecting to a network, you will need to provide an IP address and a MAC address.
to:
The board also can connect to a wired network via ethernet. When connecting to a network, you will need to provide an IP address and a MAC address. The [[Reference/Ethernet | Ethernet Library]] is fully supported.

The onboard microSD card reader is accessible through the [[Reference/SD | SD Library]]. When working with this library, SS is on Pin 4.
April 12, 2011, at 06:10 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 68-71 from:
While we wait for the new Ethernet board bootloader to upload sketches via TFTP, it's still possible to use the board right now. You'll need an external programmer to make this work.

To set up your environment for burning a sketch with a programmer, follow [[Hacking/Programmer | these instructions]].
to:
It is possible to program the Arduino Ethernet board in two ways, with the 6 pin programming header, or with an external programmer.

The 6-pin programming header is compatible with FTDI USB cables and the Sparkfun FTDI Basic Breakout. It adds support for automatic reset, allowing sketches to be uploaded without pressing the reset button on the board.

For use with an external programmer like an AVR-ISP or USBTinyISP. To set up your environment for burning a sketch with a programmer, follow [[Hacking/Programmer | these instructions]].
Deleted lines 79-80:

Changed line 82 from:
The maximum length and width of the Uno PCB are 2.7 and 2.1 inches respectively, with the RJ45 connector and power jack extending beyond the former dimension. Four screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case. Note that the distance between digital pins 7 and 8 is 160 mil (0.16"), not an even multiple of the 100 mil spacing of the other pins.
to:
The maximum length and width of the Ethernet PCB are 2.7 and 2.1 inches respectively, with the RJ45 connector and power jack extending beyond the former dimension. Four screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case. Note that the distance between digital pins 7 and 8 is 160 mil (0.16"), not an even multiple of the 100 mil spacing of the other pins.
April 12, 2011, at 06:04 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 64-65 from:
The board also can connect to a wired network via ethernet.
to:
The board also can connect to a wired network via ethernet. When connecting to a network, you will need to provide an IP address and a MAC address.
April 12, 2011, at 06:04 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 64-65 from:
The board also can cnnect to a wired network via ethernet.
to:
The board also can connect to a wired network via ethernet.
April 06, 2011, at 06:48 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
The Ethernet differs from all preceding boards in that it does not use the FTDI USB-to-serial driver chip.
to:
The Ethernet differs from all preceding boards in that it does not use the FTDI USB-to-serial driver chip, but has a Wiznet Ethernet interface
Changed lines 45-46 from:
The Arduino Uno can be powered via an external power supply, or by an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) Module.
to:
The Arduino Ethernet can be powered via an external power supply, or by an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) Module.
Deleted lines 50-59:
The power pins are as follows:

* '''VIN.''' The input voltage to the Arduino board when it's using an external power source (as opposed to 5 volts from the USB connection or other regulated power source). You can supply voltage through this pin, or, if supplying voltage via the power jack, access it through this pin.

* '''5V.''' The regulated power supply used to power the microcontroller and other components on the board. This can come either from VIN via an on-board regulator, or be supplied by USB or another regulated 5V supply.

* '''3V3.''' A 3.3 volt supply generated by the on-board regulator. Maximum current draw is 50 mA.

* '''GND.''' Ground pins.
Changed lines 55-80 from:
!!!Input and Output

Each of the 14 digital pins on the Uno can be used as an input or output, using [[Reference/PinMode | pinMode()]], [[Reference/DigitalWrite | digitalWrite()]], and [[Reference/DigitalRead | digitalRead()]] functions. They operate at 5 volts. Each pin can provide or receive a maximum of 40 mA and has an internal pull-up resistor (disconnected by default) of 20-50 kOhms. In addition, some pins have specialized functions:

* '''Serial: 0 (RX) and 1 (TX).''' Used to receive (RX) and transmit (TX) TTL serial data. These pins are connected to the corresponding pins of the ATmega8U2 USB-to-TTL Serial chip.

* '''External Interrupts: 2 and 3.''' These pins can be configured to trigger an interrupt on a low value, a rising or falling edge, or a change in value. See the [[Reference/AttachInterrupt | attachInterrupt()]] function for details.

* '''PWM: 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, and 11.''' Provide 8-bit PWM output with the [[Reference/AnalogWrite | analogWrite()]] function.

* '''SPI: 10 (SS), 11 (MOSI), 12 (MISO), 13 (SCK).''' These pins support SPI communication using the [[Reference/SPI | SPI library]].

* '''LED: 13.''' There is a built-in LED connected to digital pin 13. When the pin is HIGH value, the LED is on, when the pin is LOW, it's off.

The Uno has 6 analog inputs, labeled A0 through A5, each of which provide 10 bits of resolution (i.e. 1024 different values). By default they measure from ground to 5 volts, though is it possible to change the upper end of their range using the AREF pin and the [[Reference/AnalogReference | analogReference]]() function. Additionally, some pins have specialized functionality:

* '''I'^2^'C: A4 (SDA) and A5 (SCL).''' Support I'^2^'C (TWI) communication using the [[Reference/Wire| Wire library]].

There are a couple of other pins on the board:

* '''AREF.''' Reference voltage for the analog inputs. Used with [[Reference/AnalogReference | analogReference]]().

* '''Reset.''' Bring this line LOW to reset the microcontroller. Typically used to add a reset button to shields which block the one on the board.

See also the [[Hacking/PinMapping328 | mapping between Arduino pins and ATmega328 ports]].
to:
Changed lines 58-59 from:
The Arduino Uno has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. The ATmega328 provides UART TTL (5V) serial communication, which is available on digital pins 0 (RX) and 1 (TX). An ATmega8U2 on the board channels this serial communication over USB and appears as a virtual com port to software on the computer. The '8U2 firmware uses the standard USB COM drivers, and no external driver is needed. However, [[http://arduino.cc/en/Guide/Windows#toc4 |on Windows, a .inf file is required]]. The Arduino software includes a serial monitor which allows simple textual data to be sent to and from the Arduino board. The RX and TX LEDs on the board will flash when data is being transmitted via the USB-to-serial chip and USB connection to the computer (but not for serial communication on pins 0 and 1).
to:
The Arduino Ethernet has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. The ATmega328 provides UART TTL (5V) serial communication, which is available on digital pins 0 (RX) and 1 (TX).
Added lines 64-65:
The board also can cnnect to a wired network via ethernet.
Changed lines 68-87 from:
The Arduino Uno can be programmed with the Arduino software ([[Main/Software | download]]). Select "Arduino Uno from the '''Tools > Board''' menu (according to the microcontroller on your board). For details, see the [[Reference/HomePage | reference]] and [[Tutorial/HomePage | tutorials]].

The ATmega328 on the Arduino Uno comes preburned with a [[Tutorial/Bootloader | bootloader]] that allows you to upload new code to it without the use of an external hardware programmer. It communicates using the original STK500 protocol ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2525.pdf | reference]], [[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/avr061.zip | C header files]]).

You can also bypass the bootloader and program the microcontroller through the ICSP (In-Circuit Serial Programming) header; see [[Hacking/Programmer | these instructions]] for details.

The ATmega8U2 firmware source code is available [[ | in the Arduino repository]]. The ATmega8U2 is loaded with a DFU bootloader, which can be activated by connecting the solder jumper on the back of the board (near the map of Italy) and then resetting the 8U2. You can then use [[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/products/tools_card.asp?tool_id=3886 | Atmel's FLIP software]] (Windows) or the [[http://dfu-programmer.sourceforge.net/ | DFU programmer]] (Mac OS X and Linux) to load a new firmware. Or you can use the ISP header with an external programmer (overwriting the DFU bootloader). See [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1285962838 | this user-contributed tutorial]] for more information.

!!!Automatic (Software) Reset

Rather than requiring a physical press of the reset button before an upload, the Arduino Uno is designed in a way that allows it to be reset by software running on a connected computer. One of the hardware flow control lines (DTR) of the ATmega8U2 is connected to the reset line of the ATmega328 via a 100 nanofarad capacitor. When this line is asserted (taken low), the reset line drops long enough to reset the chip. The Arduino software uses this capability to allow you to upload code by simply pressing the upload button in the Arduino environment. This means that the bootloader can have a shorter timeout, as the lowering of DTR can be well-coordinated with the start of the upload.

This setup has other implications. When the Uno is connected to either a computer running Mac OS X or Linux, it resets each time a connection is made to it from software (via USB). For the following half-second or so, the bootloader is running on the Uno. While it is programmed to ignore malformed data (i.e. anything besides an upload of new code), it will intercept the first few bytes of data sent to the board after a connection is opened. If a sketch running on the board receives one-time configuration or other data when it first starts, make sure that the software with which it communicates waits a second after opening the connection and before sending this data.

The Uno contains a trace that can be cut to disable the auto-reset. The pads on either side of the trace can be soldered together to re-enable it. It's labeled "RESET-EN". You may also be able to disable the auto-reset by connecting a 110 ohm resistor from 5V to the reset line; see [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1213719666/all | this forum thread]] for details.

!!!USB Overcurrent Protection

The Arduino Uno has a resettable polyfuse that protects your computer's USB ports from shorts and overcurrent. Although most computers provide their own internal protection, the fuse provides an extra layer of protection. If more than 500 mA is applied to the USB port, the fuse will automatically break the connection until the short or overload is removed.
to:
While we wait for the new Ethernet board bootloader to upload sketches via TFTP, it's still possible to use the board right now. You'll need an external programmer to make this work.

To set up your environment for burning a sketch with a programmer, follow [[Hacking/Programmer | these instructions]].

Once you have changed the upload.using parameter, open the Arduino IDE. You should select the Uno from the Board menu. No need to choose a serial port. Uploading works in the same fashion, it just takes a little longer than usual.

All the Ethernet example sketches work as expected, make sure your network settings are changed to reflect the board settings in the sketch.

The "new-extension" branch of the Arduino gitHub repository includes a feature that could simplify the uploading with an external programmer. Holding down the shift button changes the "Upolad" button to "Upload using programmer".


Changed line 82 from:
The maximum length and width of the Uno PCB are 2.7 and 2.1 inches respectively, with the USB connector and power jack extending beyond the former dimension. Four screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case. Note that the distance between digital pins 7 and 8 is 160 mil (0.16"), not an even multiple of the 100 mil spacing of the other pins.
to:
The maximum length and width of the Uno PCB are 2.7 and 2.1 inches respectively, with the RJ45 connector and power jack extending beyond the former dimension. Four screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case. Note that the distance between digital pins 7 and 8 is 160 mil (0.16"), not an even multiple of the 100 mil spacing of the other pins.
March 31, 2011, at 08:59 PM by Scott Fitzgerald - First Draft
Added lines 1-123:
!!Arduino Ethernet

%height=400%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetFront.jpg |Attach:ArduinoEthernetFront.jpg]]

%height=400%[[Attach:ArduinoEthernetBack.jpg |Attach:ArduinoEthernetBack.jpg]]

!!!Overview

The Arduino Ethernet is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328 ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc8161.pdf | datasheet]]). It has 14 digital input/output pins (of which 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a RJ45 connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button.

The Ethernet differs from all preceding boards in that it does not use the FTDI USB-to-serial driver chip.

!!!Summary

||border=0
||Microcontroller ||ATmega328 ||
||Operating Voltage ||5V ||
||Input Voltage (recommended) ||7-12V ||
||Input Voltage (limits) ||6-20V ||
||Digital I/O Pins ||9 (of which 4 provide PWM output) ||
*Arduino Pins Used
**10 to 13 used for SPI
**4 used for SD card
**2 W5100 interrupt
||Analog Input Pins ||6 ||
||DC Current per I/O Pin ||40 mA ||
||DC Current for 3.3V Pin ||50 mA ||
||Flash Memory ||32 KB (ATmega328) of which 0.5 KB used by bootloader ||
||SRAM ||2 KB (ATmega328) ||
||EEPROM ||1 KB (ATmega328) ||
||Clock Speed ||16 MHz ||
||W5100 TCP/IP Embedded Ethernet Controller
||Power Over Ethernet ready Magnetic Jack
||Micro SD card, with active voltage translators


!!!Schematic & Reference Design

EAGLE files: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-reference-design.zip | arduino-ethernet-reference-design.zip]]

Schematic: [[Attach:arduino-ethernet-schematic.pdf | arduino-ethernet-schematic.pdf]]

!!!Power

The Arduino Uno can be powered via an external power supply, or by an optional Power over Ethernet (PoE) Module.

Power can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the board's power jack. Leads from a battery can be inserted in the Gnd and Vin pin headers of the POWER connector.

The board can operate on an external supply of 6 to 20 volts. If supplied with less than 7V, however, the 5V pin may supply less than five volts and the board may be unstable. If using more than 12V, the voltage regulator may overheat and damage the board. The recommended range is 7 to 12 volts.

The power pins are as follows:

* '''VIN.''' The input voltage to the Arduino board when it's using an external power source (as opposed to 5 volts from the USB connection or other regulated power source). You can supply voltage through this pin, or, if supplying voltage via the power jack, access it through this pin.

* '''5V.''' The regulated power supply used to power the microcontroller and other components on the board. This can come either from VIN via an on-board regulator, or be supplied by USB or another regulated 5V supply.

* '''3V3.''' A 3.3 volt supply generated by the on-board regulator. Maximum current draw is 50 mA.

* '''GND.''' Ground pins.

!!!Memory

The ATmega328 has 32 KB (with 0.5 KB used for the bootloader). It also has 2 KB of SRAM and 1 KB of EEPROM (which can be read and written with the [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Reference/EEPROM | EEPROM library]]).

!!!Input and Output

Each of the 14 digital pins on the Uno can be used as an input or output, using [[Reference/PinMode | pinMode()]], [[Reference/DigitalWrite | digitalWrite()]], and [[Reference/DigitalRead | digitalRead()]] functions. They operate at 5 volts. Each pin can provide or receive a maximum of 40 mA and has an internal pull-up resistor (disconnected by default) of 20-50 kOhms. In addition, some pins have specialized functions:

* '''Serial: 0 (RX) and 1 (TX).''' Used to receive (RX) and transmit (TX) TTL serial data. These pins are connected to the corresponding pins of the ATmega8U2 USB-to-TTL Serial chip.

* '''External Interrupts: 2 and 3.''' These pins can be configured to trigger an interrupt on a low value, a rising or falling edge, or a change in value. See the [[Reference/AttachInterrupt | attachInterrupt()]] function for details.

* '''PWM: 3, 5, 6, 9, 10, and 11.''' Provide 8-bit PWM output with the [[Reference/AnalogWrite | analogWrite()]] function.

* '''SPI: 10 (SS), 11 (MOSI), 12 (MISO), 13 (SCK).''' These pins support SPI communication using the [[Reference/SPI | SPI library]].

* '''LED: 13.''' There is a built-in LED connected to digital pin 13. When the pin is HIGH value, the LED is on, when the pin is LOW, it's off.

The Uno has 6 analog inputs, labeled A0 through A5, each of which provide 10 bits of resolution (i.e. 1024 different values). By default they measure from ground to 5 volts, though is it possible to change the upper end of their range using the AREF pin and the [[Reference/AnalogReference | analogReference]]() function. Additionally, some pins have specialized functionality:

* '''I'^2^'C: A4 (SDA) and A5 (SCL).''' Support I'^2^'C (TWI) communication using the [[Reference/Wire| Wire library]].

There are a couple of other pins on the board:

* '''AREF.''' Reference voltage for the analog inputs. Used with [[Reference/AnalogReference | analogReference]]().

* '''Reset.''' Bring this line LOW to reset the microcontroller. Typically used to add a reset button to shields which block the one on the board.

See also the [[Hacking/PinMapping328 | mapping between Arduino pins and ATmega328 ports]].

!!!Communication

The Arduino Uno has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. The ATmega328 provides UART TTL (5V) serial communication, which is available on digital pins 0 (RX) and 1 (TX). An ATmega8U2 on the board channels this serial communication over USB and appears as a virtual com port to software on the computer. The '8U2 firmware uses the standard USB COM drivers, and no external driver is needed. However, [[http://arduino.cc/en/Guide/Windows#toc4 |on Windows, a .inf file is required]]. The Arduino software includes a serial monitor which allows simple textual data to be sent to and from the Arduino board. The RX and TX LEDs on the board will flash when data is being transmitted via the USB-to-serial chip and USB connection to the computer (but not for serial communication on pins 0 and 1).

A [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Reference/SoftwareSerial | SoftwareSerial library]] allows for serial communication on any of the Uno's digital pins.

The ATmega328 also supports I2C (TWI) and SPI communication. The Arduino software includes a Wire library to simplify use of the I2C bus; see the [[Reference/Wire | documentation]] for details. For SPI communication, use the [[Reference/SPI | SPI library]].

!!!Programming

The Arduino Uno can be programmed with the Arduino software ([[Main/Software | download]]). Select "Arduino Uno from the '''Tools > Board''' menu (according to the microcontroller on your board). For details, see the [[Reference/HomePage | reference]] and [[Tutorial/HomePage | tutorials]].

The ATmega328 on the Arduino Uno comes preburned with a [[Tutorial/Bootloader | bootloader]] that allows you to upload new code to it without the use of an external hardware programmer. It communicates using the original STK500 protocol ([[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc2525.pdf | reference]], [[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/avr061.zip | C header files]]).

You can also bypass the bootloader and program the microcontroller through the ICSP (In-Circuit Serial Programming) header; see [[Hacking/Programmer | these instructions]] for details.

The ATmega8U2 firmware source code is available [[ | in the Arduino repository]]. The ATmega8U2 is loaded with a DFU bootloader, which can be activated by connecting the solder jumper on the back of the board (near the map of Italy) and then resetting the 8U2. You can then use [[http://www.atmel.com/dyn/products/tools_card.asp?tool_id=3886 | Atmel's FLIP software]] (Windows) or the [[http://dfu-programmer.sourceforge.net/ | DFU programmer]] (Mac OS X and Linux) to load a new firmware. Or you can use the ISP header with an external programmer (overwriting the DFU bootloader). See [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1285962838 | this user-contributed tutorial]] for more information.

!!!Automatic (Software) Reset

Rather than requiring a physical press of the reset button before an upload, the Arduino Uno is designed in a way that allows it to be reset by software running on a connected computer. One of the hardware flow control lines (DTR) of the ATmega8U2 is connected to the reset line of the ATmega328 via a 100 nanofarad capacitor. When this line is asserted (taken low), the reset line drops long enough to reset the chip. The Arduino software uses this capability to allow you to upload code by simply pressing the upload button in the Arduino environment. This means that the bootloader can have a shorter timeout, as the lowering of DTR can be well-coordinated with the start of the upload.

This setup has other implications. When the Uno is connected to either a computer running Mac OS X or Linux, it resets each time a connection is made to it from software (via USB). For the following half-second or so, the bootloader is running on the Uno. While it is programmed to ignore malformed data (i.e. anything besides an upload of new code), it will intercept the first few bytes of data sent to the board after a connection is opened. If a sketch running on the board receives one-time configuration or other data when it first starts, make sure that the software with which it communicates waits a second after opening the connection and before sending this data.

The Uno contains a trace that can be cut to disable the auto-reset. The pads on either side of the trace can be soldered together to re-enable it. It's labeled "RESET-EN". You may also be able to disable the auto-reset by connecting a 110 ohm resistor from 5V to the reset line; see [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1213719666/all | this forum thread]] for details.

!!!USB Overcurrent Protection

The Arduino Uno has a resettable polyfuse that protects your computer's USB ports from shorts and overcurrent. Although most computers provide their own internal protection, the fuse provides an extra layer of protection. If more than 500 mA is applied to the USB port, the fuse will automatically break the connection until the short or overload is removed.

!!!Physical Characteristics

The maximum length and width of the Uno PCB are 2.7 and 2.1 inches respectively, with the USB connector and power jack extending beyond the former dimension. Four screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case. Note that the distance between digital pins 7 and 8 is 160 mil (0.16"), not an even multiple of the 100 mil spacing of the other pins.

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