Main.FAQ History

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September 19, 2013, at 10:56 PM by Federico -
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(:div class="question":)Can I use the Arduino logo to identify non commercial content?

(:div class="answer":)If you're creating tutorials, managing a local community of Arduino users, opening up an Arduino-focused page online (ie. social networks) you can use the [[Trademark/CommunityLogo | Arduino Community Logo]]! This will allow people identify better what comes directly from us and what comes from the community.
July 12, 2013, at 12:30 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
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July 11, 2013, at 04:17 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
July 11, 2013, at 04:13 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
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July 11, 2013, at 03:23 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
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Read about Clones, Derivatives and Counterfeits by Massimo Banzi ([[http://blog.arduino.cc/?p=7620 | Blog]])\\
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Read about Clones, Derivatives and Counterfeits by Massimo Banzi ([[http://blog.arduino.cc/2013/07/10/send-in-the-clones/ | Blog]])\\
July 11, 2013, at 01:36 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
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Learn about how to spot a counterfeit ([[arduino.cc/en/Products/Counterfeit | Website]])
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Learn about how to spot a counterfeit ([[http://arduino.cc/en/Products/Counterfeit | Website]])
July 11, 2013, at 01:31 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
July 11, 2013, at 01:30 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
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Read about Clones, Derivatives and Counterfeits by Massimo Banzi ([[http://blog.arduino.cc/?p=7620 | Blog]])

Learn about how to spot a counterfeit ([[arduino.cc/en/Products/Counterfeit | Website]])\\
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Read about Clones, Derivatives and Counterfeits by Massimo Banzi ([[http://blog.arduino.cc/?p=7620 | Blog]])\\
Learn about how to spot a counterfeit ([[arduino.cc/en/Products/Counterfeit | Website]])
July 11, 2013, at 01:29 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
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Learn about how to spot a counterfeit ([[arduino.cc/en/Products/Counterfeit | Website]])
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Learn about how to spot a counterfeit ([[arduino.cc/en/Products/Counterfeit | Website]])\\
July 11, 2013, at 01:29 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
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July 11, 2013, at 01:28 PM by Alberto Cicchi -
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Read about Clones, Derivatives and Counterfeits by Massimo Banzi ([[http://blog.arduino.cc/?p=7620 | Blog]])
Learn about how to spot a counterfeit ([[arduino.cc/en/Products/Counterfeit | Website]])
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April 01, 2013, at 06:02 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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(:div class="answer":)Yes, although it may require some modifications to the Arduino core libraries. See the [[http://code.google.com/p/arduino/wiki/Porting | porting page]] in the Arduino Google Code project for details.
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(:div class="answer":)Yes, although it may require some modifications to the Arduino core libraries.
June 02, 2012, at 09:21 PM by David A. Mellis -
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(:div class="answer":)The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]: the Uno, Mega2560, Nano, Bluetooth (BT), LilyPad, Mini, Pro, Pro Mini, and a few older models, along with the Ethernet, XBee, motor, and prototyping shields. These are boards whose manufacturers work with the Arduino team to ensure a good user experience, compatibility with the Arduino software, and a quality product. In return for their status as official boards, the manufacturers pay a licensing fee to the Arduino team to support the further development of the project.
In general, we try to restrict use of the name "Arduino" to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as "Arduino compatible", it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t fund continued work on the project.
to:
(:div class="answer":)The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]. These are boards whose manufacturers work with the Arduino team to ensure a good user experience, compatibility with the Arduino software, and a quality product. In return for their status as official boards, the manufacturers pay a licensing fee to the Arduino team to support the further development of the project.

In general, we restrict use of the name "Arduino" to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as "Arduino compatible", it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t fund continued work on the project.
September 24, 2011, at 12:38 AM by Federico -
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(:div class="answer":)You can buy an Arduino board from one of the distributors listed on the [[Buy | buy]] page. If you'd prefer to build your own, see the [[ArduinoBoardSerialSingleSided3 | Arduino Single-Sided Serial board]], which can be easily etched and assembled.
to:
(:div class="answer":)You can buy an Arduino board from the [[http://store.arduino.cc/ww/ |official store]] online or from one of the distributors listed on the [[Buy | buy]] page. If you'd prefer to build your own, see the [[ArduinoBoardSerialSingleSided3 | Arduino Single-Sided Serial board]], which can be easily etched and assembled.
March 11, 2011, at 12:01 PM by David Cuartielles -
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(:div class="answer":)Yes, check out our[[http://arduino.cc/en/Main/PrivacyPolicy | Privacy Policy]] page. There you will see how we handle visitor's information and our non-disclosure policies.
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(:div class="answer":)Yes, check out our [[http://arduino.cc/en/Main/PrivacyPolicy | Privacy Policy]] page. There you will see how we handle visitor's information and our non-disclosure policies.
March 11, 2011, at 12:00 PM by David Cuartielles -
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(:div class="answer":)Yes, check out [[http://arduino.cc/en/Main/PrivacyPolicy || Privacy Policy]] page.
to:
(:div class="answer":)Yes, check out our[[http://arduino.cc/en/Main/PrivacyPolicy | Privacy Policy]] page. There you will see how we handle visitor's information and our non-disclosure policies.
March 11, 2011, at 11:59 AM by David Cuartielles -
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(:div class="question":) Do you have a Privacy Policy about my data as registered user
(:div class="answer":)Yes, check out [[http://arduino.cc/en/Main/PrivacyPolicy || Privacy Policy]] page.
January 11, 2011, at 05:35 PM by Tom Igoe -
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(:div class="answer":)The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]: the Duemilanove, Nano, Mega, Bluetooth (BT), LilyPad, Mini, Pro, Pro Mini, and a few older models, along with the Ethernet, XBee, motor, and prototyping shields. These are boards whose manufacturers work with the Arduino team to ensure a good user experience, compatibility with the Arduino software, and a quality product. In return for their status as official boards, the manufacturers pay a licensing fee to the Arduino team to support the further development of the project.
to:
(:div class="answer":)The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]: the Uno, Mega2560, Nano, Bluetooth (BT), LilyPad, Mini, Pro, Pro Mini, and a few older models, along with the Ethernet, XBee, motor, and prototyping shields. These are boards whose manufacturers work with the Arduino team to ensure a good user experience, compatibility with the Arduino software, and a quality product. In return for their status as official boards, the manufacturers pay a licensing fee to the Arduino team to support the further development of the project.
September 27, 2010, at 05:43 PM by David Cuartielles -
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[[#naming]]
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(:div class="answer":)If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will allow people identify you with your products and help you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just pick a random word that sounds cool. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team. Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "duino" suffix, its use causes the Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible); you might want to avoid it.
to:
(:div class="answer":)If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will allow people identify you with your products and help you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just pick a random word that sounds cool. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team.
While unofficial products should not have "Arduino" in their name, it's okay to describe your product in relation to the Arduino project and platform. Here are a few guidelines that explain which uses we consider reasonable.
Not okay:
* Arduino Xxxxxx
* Xxxxxx Arduino
* Arduino Compatible Xxxxxx - use "Xxxxxx (Arduino-Compatible)" instead
Okay:
* Xxxxxx for Arduino - products that work with official Arduino boards (e.g. shields or kits)
* Xxxxxx (Arduino-Compatible) - variations and clones which are software and hardware compatible
Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "duino" suffix, its use causes the Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible); you might want to avoid it. (It's also trademarked by a Hungarian company.)
September 23, 2010, at 04:17 PM by David Cuartielles -
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(:div class="question":)Where is the troubleshooting section?
(:div class="answer":)These questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].
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%p class="nop"%

!!!Troubleshooting
These questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].
September 23, 2010, at 04:16 PM by David Cuartielles -
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September 23, 2010, at 04:16 PM by David Cuartielles -
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!!!TroubleshootingThese questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].
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%p class="nop"%
!!!Troubleshooting
These questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].
September 23, 2010, at 04:15 PM by David Cuartielles -
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(:div class="question":)Where is the troubleshooting section?

(:div class="answer":)These questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].
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!!!TroubleshootingThese questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].
September 23, 2010, at 04:14 PM by David Cuartielles -
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September 23, 2010, at 04:11 PM by David Cuartielles -
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September 23, 2010, at 04:11 PM by David Cuartielles -
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(:div class="answer":)These questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].
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(:div class="answer":)These questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].

(:divend:)
September 23, 2010, at 04:06 PM by David Cuartielles -
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!!!Troubleshooting%p float="left"%
These questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].
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(:div class="question":)Where is the troubleshooting section?

(:div class="answer":)These questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].
September 23, 2010, at 04:05 PM by David Cuartielles -
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!!!Troubleshooting%p float="left"%
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September 23, 2010, at 03:46 PM by David Cuartielles -
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(:div class="question":)
(:div class="answer":)In general, we try to restrict use of the name "Arduino" to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as "Arduino compatible", it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t fund continued work on the project.
to:
In general, we try to restrict use of the name "Arduino" to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as "Arduino compatible", it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t fund continued work on the project.
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(:div class="question":)
(:div class="answer":)* Physically embedding an Arduino board inside a commercial product does not require you to disclose or open-source any information about its design.

(:div class="question":)
(:div class="answer":)* Deriving the design of a commercial product from the Eagle files for an Arduino board requires you to release the modified files under the same Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license. You may manufacture and sell the resulting product.

(:div class="question":)
(:div class="answer":)* Using the Arduino core and libraries for the firmware of a commercial product does not require you to release the source code for the firmware. The LGPL does, however, require you to make available object files that allow for the relinking of the firmware against updated versions of the Arduino core and libraries. Any modifications to the core and libraries must be released under the LGPL.

(:div class="question":)
(:div class="answer":)* The source code for the Arduino environment is covered by the GPL, which requires any modifications to be open-sourced under the same license. It does not prevent the sale of derivative software or its inclusion in commercial products.

(:div class="question":)
(:div class="answer":)In all cases, the exact requirements are determined by the applicable license. Additionally, see the previous question for information about the use of the name “Arduino”.
to:
* Physically embedding an Arduino board inside a commercial product does not require you to disclose or open-source any information about its design.
* Deriving the design of a commercial product from the Eagle files for an Arduino board requires you to release the modified files under the same Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license. You may manufacture and sell the resulting product.
* Using the Arduino core and libraries for the firmware of a commercial product does not require you to release the source code for the firmware. The LGPL does, however, require you to make available object files that allow for the relinking of the firmware against updated versions of the Arduino core and libraries. Any modifications to the core and libraries must be released under the LGPL.
* The source code for the Arduino environment is covered by the GPL, which requires any modifications to be open-sourced under the same license. It does not prevent the sale of derivative software or its inclusion in commercial products.
In all cases, the exact requirements are determined by the applicable license. Additionally, see the previous question for information about the use of the name “Arduino”.
September 23, 2010, at 03:44 PM by David Cuartielles -
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(:div class="question":)
(:div class="answer":)The Arduino software is also open-source. The source code for the Java environment is released under the GPL and the C/C++ microcontroller libraries are under the LGPL.
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The Arduino software is also open-source. The source code for the Java environment is released under the GPL and the C/C++ microcontroller libraries are under the LGPL.
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'''What is an Arduino?'''

Glad you asked, we have a great introduction page on Arduino, [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Guide/Introduction | click here to read it.]]

'''What do you mean by open-source hardware?'''

Open-source hardware shares much of the principles and approach of free and open-source software. In particular, we believe that people should be able to study our hardware to understand how it works, make changes to it, and share those changes. To facilitate this, we release all of the original design files (Eagle CAD) for the Arduino hardware. These files are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license, which allows for both personal and commercial derivative works, as long as they credit Arduino and release their designs under the same license.

The Arduino software is also open-source. The source code for the Java environment is released under the GPL and the C/C++ microcontroller libraries are under the LGPL.

'''How can I get an Arduino board?'''

You can buy an Arduino board from one of the distributors listed on the [[Buy | buy]] page. If you'd prefer to build your own, see the [[ArduinoBoardSerialSingleSided3 | Arduino Single-Sided Serial board]], which can be easily etched and assembled.

'''Who makes Arduino boards?'''

Most of the official Arduino boards are manufactured by SmartProjects in Italy. The Arduino Pro, Pro Mini, and LilyPad are manufactured by SparkFun Electronics (a US company). The Arduino Nano is manufactured by Gravitech (also a US company).

'''Which are the official Arduino boards?'''

The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]: the Duemilanove, Nano, Mega, Bluetooth (BT), LilyPad, Mini, Pro, Pro Mini, and a few older models, along with the Ethernet, XBee, motor, and prototyping shields. These are boards whose manufacturers work with the Arduino team to ensure a good user experience, compatibility with the Arduino software, and a quality product. In return for their status as official boards, the manufacturers pay a licensing fee to the Arduino team to support the further development of the project.

In general, we try to restrict use of the name "Arduino" to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as "Arduino compatible", it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t fund continued work on the project.

'''I want to design my own board; what should I do?'''

The reference designs for the Arduino boards are available from the [[Hardware | hardware]] page. They're licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license, so you are free to use and adapt them for your own needs without asking permission or paying a fee. If you're looking to make something of interest to the community, we'd encourage you to discuss your ideas on the [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?board=hwdev | hardware development forum]] so that potential users can offer suggestions.

'''What should I call my boards?'''

If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will allow people identify you with your products and help you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just pick a random word that sounds cool. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team. Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "duino" suffix, its use causes the Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible); you might want to avoid it.

'''Can I build a commercial product based on Arduino?'''

Yes, with the following conditions:

* Physically embedding an Arduino board inside a commercial product does not require you to disclose or open-source any information about its design.

* Deriving the design of a commercial product from the Eagle files for an Arduino board requires you to release the modified files under the same Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license. You may manufacture and sell the resulting product.

* Using the Arduino core and libraries for the firmware of a commercial product does not require you to release the source code for the firmware. The LGPL does, however, require you to make available object files that allow for the relinking of the firmware against updated versions of the Arduino core and libraries. Any modifications to the core and libraries must be released under the LGPL.

* The source code for the Arduino environment is covered by the GPL, which requires any modifications to be open-sourced under the same license. It does not prevent the sale of derivative software or its inclusion in commercial products.

In all cases, the exact requirements are determined by the applicable license. Additionally, see the previous question for information about the use of the name “Arduino”.
to:
(:div class="question":)What is an Arduino?

(:div class="answer":)Glad you asked, we have a great introduction page on Arduino, [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Guide/Introduction | click here to read it.]]

(:div class="question":)What do you mean by open-source hardware?

(:div class="answer":)Open-source hardware shares much of the principles and approach of free and open-source software. In particular, we believe that people should be able to study our hardware to understand how it works, make changes to it, and share those changes. To facilitate this, we release all of the original design files (Eagle CAD) for the Arduino hardware. These files are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license, which allows for both personal and commercial derivative works, as long as they credit Arduino and release their designs under the same license.

(:div class="answer":)The Arduino software is also open-source. The source code for the Java environment is released under the GPL and the C/C++ microcontroller libraries are under the LGPL.

(:div class="question":)How can I get an Arduino board?

(:div class="answer":)You can buy an Arduino board from one of the distributors listed on the [[Buy | buy]] page. If you'd prefer to build your own, see the [[ArduinoBoardSerialSingleSided3 | Arduino Single-Sided Serial board]], which can be easily etched and assembled.

(:div class="question":)Who makes Arduino boards?

(:div class="answer":)Most of the official Arduino boards are manufactured by SmartProjects in Italy. The Arduino Pro, Pro Mini, and LilyPad are manufactured by SparkFun Electronics (a US company). The Arduino Nano is manufactured by Gravitech (also a US company).

(:div class="question":)Which are the official Arduino boards?

(:div class="answer":)The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]: the Duemilanove, Nano, Mega, Bluetooth (BT), LilyPad, Mini, Pro, Pro Mini, and a few older models, along with the Ethernet, XBee, motor, and prototyping shields. These are boards whose manufacturers work with the Arduino team to ensure a good user experience, compatibility with the Arduino software, and a quality product. In return for their status as official boards, the manufacturers pay a licensing fee to the Arduino team to support the further development of the project.

(:div class="answer":)In general, we try to restrict use of the name "Arduino" to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as "Arduino compatible", it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t fund continued work on the project.

(:div class="question":)I want to design my own board; what should I do?

(:div class="answer":)The reference designs for the Arduino boards are available from the [[Hardware | hardware]] page. They're licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license, so you are free to use and adapt them for your own needs without asking permission or paying a fee. If you're looking to make something of interest to the community, we'd encourage you to discuss your ideas on the [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?board=hwdev | hardware development forum]] so that potential users can offer suggestions.

(:div class="question":)What should I call my boards?

(:div class="answer":)If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will allow people identify you with your products and help you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just pick a random word that sounds cool. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team. Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "duino" suffix, its use causes the Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible); you might want to avoid it.

(:div class="question":)Can I build a commercial product based on Arduino?

(:div class="answer":)Yes, with the following conditions:

(:div class="answer":)* Physically embedding an Arduino board inside a commercial product does not require you to disclose or open-source any information about its design.

(:div class="answer":)* Deriving the design of a commercial product from the Eagle files for an Arduino board requires you to release the modified files under the same Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license. You may manufacture and sell the resulting product.

(:div class="answer":)* Using the Arduino core and libraries for the firmware of a commercial product does not require you to release the source code for the firmware. The LGPL does, however, require you to make available object files that allow for the relinking of the firmware against updated versions of the Arduino core and libraries. Any modifications to the core and libraries must be released under the LGPL.

(:div class="answer":)* The source code for the Arduino environment is covered by the GPL, which requires any modifications to be open-sourced under the same license. It does not prevent the sale of derivative software or its inclusion in commercial products.

(:div class="answer":)In all cases, the exact requirements are determined by the applicable license. Additionally, see the previous question for information about the use of the name “Arduino”.
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'''How can I run the Arduino IDE under Linux?'''

See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Ubuntu | for Ubuntu Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Gentoo | for Gentoo Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | for Linux]], or [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information. Or, you can [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/CommandLine | use Arduino from the command line]], and not have to install Java.

'''Can I program the Arduino board in C?'''

In fact, you already are; the Arduino language is merely a set of C/C++ functions that can be called from your code. Your sketch undergoes minor changes (e.g. automatic generation of function prototypes) and then is passed directly to a C/C++ compiler (avr-g++). All standard C and C++ constructs [[http://www.nongnu.org/avr-libc/user-manual/FAQ.html#faq_cplusplus | supported by avr-g++]] should work in Arduino. For more details, see the page on the [[Hacking/BuildProcess | Arduino build process]].

'''Can I use a different IDE to program the Arduino board?'''

It is possible to compile programs for the Arduino using other build tools (e.g. Makefiles and/or AVR Studio). You'll need to configure these to link against the appropriate files in the Arduino core libraries. See the description of the Arduino [[http://code.google.com/p/arduino/wiki/BuildProcess | build process]].

'''Can I use an Arduino board without the Arduino software?'''

Sure. It's just an AVR development board, you can use straight AVR C or C++ (with avr-gcc and avrdude or AVR Studio) to program it.

'''Can I use the Arduino software with other AVR boards?'''

Yes, although it may require some modifications to the Arduino core libraries. See the [[http://code.google.com/p/arduino/wiki/Porting | porting page]] in the Arduino Google Code project for details.
to:
(:div class="question":)How can I run the Arduino IDE under Linux?

(:div class="answer":)See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Ubuntu | for Ubuntu Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Gentoo | for Gentoo Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | for Linux]], or [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information. Or, you can [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/CommandLine | use Arduino from the command line]], and not have to install Java.

(:div class="question":)Can I program the Arduino board in C?

(:div class="answer":)In fact, you already are; the Arduino language is merely a set of C/C++ functions that can be called from your code. Your sketch undergoes minor changes (e.g. automatic generation of function prototypes) and then is passed directly to a C/C++ compiler (avr-g++). All standard C and C++ constructs [[http://www.nongnu.org/avr-libc/user-manual/FAQ.html#faq_cplusplus | supported by avr-g++]] should work in Arduino. For more details, see the page on the [[Hacking/BuildProcess | Arduino build process]].

(:div class="question":)Can I use a different IDE to program the Arduino board?

(:div class="answer":)It is possible to compile programs for the Arduino using other build tools (e.g. Makefiles and/or AVR Studio). You'll need to configure these to link against the appropriate files in the Arduino core libraries. See the description of the Arduino [[http://code.google.com/p/arduino/wiki/BuildProcess | build process]].

(:div class="question":)Can I use an Arduino board without the Arduino software?

(:div class="answer":)Sure. It's just an AVR development board, you can use straight AVR C or C++ (with avr-gcc and avrdude or AVR Studio) to program it.

(:div class="question":)Can I use the Arduino software with other AVR boards?

(:div class="answer":)Yes, although it may require some modifications to the Arduino core libraries. See the [[http://code.google.com/p/arduino/wiki/Porting | porting page]] in the Arduino Google Code project for details.
May 16, 2010, at 04:21 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 25-26 from:
In general, we try to restrict use of the name “Arduino” to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as “Arduino compatible”, it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t fund continued work on the project.
to:
In general, we try to restrict use of the name "Arduino" to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as "Arduino compatible", it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t fund continued work on the project.
April 01, 2010, at 10:49 PM by David A. Mellis -
April 01, 2010, at 10:48 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 60-61 from:
It is possible to compile programs for the Arduino using a [[Hacking/CommandLine | Makefile and the command line]]. If you can get your IDE to run make, you should be all set.
to:
It is possible to compile programs for the Arduino using other build tools (e.g. Makefiles and/or AVR Studio). You'll need to configure these to link against the appropriate files in the Arduino core libraries. See the description of the Arduino [[http://code.google.com/p/arduino/wiki/BuildProcess | build process]].
December 23, 2009, at 11:42 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 7-12:
'''What do you mean by open-source hardware?'''

Open-source hardware shares much of the principles and approach of free and open-source software. In particular, we believe that people should be able to study our hardware to understand how it works, make changes to it, and share those changes. To facilitate this, we release all of the original design files (Eagle CAD) for the Arduino hardware. These files are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license, which allows for both personal and commercial derivative works, as long as they credit Arduino and release their designs under the same license.

The Arduino software is also open-source. The source code for the Java environment is released under the GPL and the C/C++ microcontroller libraries are under the LGPL.
Deleted lines 26-29:
'''Is Arduino open-source?'''

Yes. The source code for the Java environment is released under the GPL, the C/C++ microcontroller libraries under the LGPL, and the schematics and CAD files under Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike licenses.
December 23, 2009, at 11:37 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 17-18 from:
The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]: the Duemilanove, Nano, Mega, Bluetooth (BT), LilyPad, Mini, Pro, Pro Mini, and a few older models, along with the Ethernet, XBee, motor, and prototyping shields. In general, we try to restrict use of the name “Arduino” to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as “Arduino compatible”, it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t support continued work on the project.
to:
The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]: the Duemilanove, Nano, Mega, Bluetooth (BT), LilyPad, Mini, Pro, Pro Mini, and a few older models, along with the Ethernet, XBee, motor, and prototyping shields. These are boards whose manufacturers work with the Arduino team to ensure a good user experience, compatibility with the Arduino software, and a quality product. In return for their status as official boards, the manufacturers pay a licensing fee to the Arduino team to support the further development of the project.

In general, we try to restrict use of the name “Arduino” to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as “Arduino compatible”, it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t fund continued work on the project.
December 23, 2009, at 11:27 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 17-18 from:
The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]: the Duemilanove, Nano, Mega, Bluetooth (BT), LilyPad, Mini, Pro, Pro Mini, and a few older models, along with the Ethernet, XBee, Motor, and Prototyping Shields. In general, we try to restrict use of the name “Arduino” to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as “Arduino compatible”, it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t support continued work on the project.
to:
The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]: the Duemilanove, Nano, Mega, Bluetooth (BT), LilyPad, Mini, Pro, Pro Mini, and a few older models, along with the Ethernet, XBee, motor, and prototyping shields. In general, we try to restrict use of the name “Arduino” to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as “Arduino compatible”, it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t support continued work on the project.
December 23, 2009, at 11:26 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 17-18 from:
The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]: the Duemilanove, Nano, Mega, Bluetooth (BT), LilyPad, Mini, Pro, Pro Mini, and a few older models. In general, we try to restrict use of the name “Arduino” to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as “Arduino compatible”, it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t support continued work on the project.
to:
The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]: the Duemilanove, Nano, Mega, Bluetooth (BT), LilyPad, Mini, Pro, Pro Mini, and a few older models, along with the Ethernet, XBee, Motor, and Prototyping Shields. In general, we try to restrict use of the name “Arduino” to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as “Arduino compatible”, it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t support continued work on the project.
November 29, 2009, at 01:55 AM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 64-65 from:
Yes, although it may require some modifications to the Arduino core libraries. See the [[Hacking/OtherHardware | other hardware]] page for details.
to:
Yes, although it may require some modifications to the Arduino core libraries. See the [[http://code.google.com/p/arduino/wiki/Porting | porting page]] in the Arduino Google Code project for details.
November 29, 2009, at 01:51 AM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 15-18:
'''Which are the official Arduino boards?'''

The official Arduino boards are the ones listed on the [[Main/Hardware | hardware page]]: the Duemilanove, Nano, Mega, Bluetooth (BT), LilyPad, Mini, Pro, Pro Mini, and a few older models. In general, we try to restrict use of the name “Arduino” to the official boards. If you find a product under a different name but described as “Arduino compatible”, it’s probably not an official board and doesn’t support continued work on the project.
August 16, 2009, at 12:38 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 11-14:
'''Who makes Arduino boards?'''

Most of the official Arduino boards are manufactured by SmartProjects in Italy. The Arduino Pro, Pro Mini, and LilyPad are manufactured by SparkFun Electronics (a US company). The Arduino Nano is manufactured by Gravitech (also a US company).
August 16, 2009, at 12:34 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 23-36:
'''Can I build a commercial product based on Arduino?'''

Yes, with the following conditions:

* Physically embedding an Arduino board inside a commercial product does not require you to disclose or open-source any information about its design.

* Deriving the design of a commercial product from the Eagle files for an Arduino board requires you to release the modified files under the same Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license. You may manufacture and sell the resulting product.

* Using the Arduino core and libraries for the firmware of a commercial product does not require you to release the source code for the firmware. The LGPL does, however, require you to make available object files that allow for the relinking of the firmware against updated versions of the Arduino core and libraries. Any modifications to the core and libraries must be released under the LGPL.

* The source code for the Arduino environment is covered by the GPL, which requires any modifications to be open-sourced under the same license. It does not prevent the sale of derivative software or its inclusion in commercial products.

In all cases, the exact requirements are determined by the applicable license. Additionally, see the previous question for information about the use of the name “Arduino”.
April 16, 2009, at 06:00 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 38-39 from:
Sure. It's just an ATmega168 development board, you can use straight AVR C or C++ (with avr-gcc and avrdude or AVR Studio) to program it.
to:
Sure. It's just an AVR development board, you can use straight AVR C or C++ (with avr-gcc and avrdude or AVR Studio) to program it.
July 18, 2008, at 10:52 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 36-43:
'''Can I use an Arduino board without the Arduino software?'''

Sure. It's just an ATmega168 development board, you can use straight AVR C or C++ (with avr-gcc and avrdude or AVR Studio) to program it.

'''Can I use the Arduino software with other AVR boards?'''

Yes, although it may require some modifications to the Arduino core libraries. See the [[Hacking/OtherHardware | other hardware]] page for details.
July 18, 2008, at 10:49 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 32-33 from:
It is also possible to compile programs for the Arduino using a [[Hacking/CommandLine | Makefile and the command line]].
to:
'''Can I use a different IDE to program the Arduino board?'''

It is possible to compile programs for the Arduino using a [[Hacking/CommandLine | Makefile and the command line]]. If you can get your IDE to run make, you should be all set.
July 02, 2008, at 09:48 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 21-22 from:
If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will allow people identify you with your products and help you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just borrow the name of your pet or a character from a novel. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team. Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "duino" suffix, its use causes the Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible); you might want to avoid it.
to:
If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will allow people identify you with your products and help you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just pick a random word that sounds cool. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team. Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "duino" suffix, its use causes the Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible); you might want to avoid it.
July 02, 2008, at 09:47 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 21-22 from:
If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will help people identify you with your products and allow you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just borrow the name of your pet or a character from a novel. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team. Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "duino" suffix, its use causes the Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible); you might want to avoid it.
to:
If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will allow people identify you with your products and help you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just borrow the name of your pet or a character from a novel. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team. Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "duino" suffix, its use causes the Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible); you might want to avoid it.
July 02, 2008, at 09:47 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 21-22 from:
If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will help people identify you with your products and allow you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just borrow the name of your pet or a character from a novel. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team. Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "duino" suffix, its use causes the Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible). So you might want to avoid it.
to:
If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will help people identify you with your products and allow you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just borrow the name of your pet or a character from a novel. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team. Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "duino" suffix, its use causes the Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible); you might want to avoid it.
July 02, 2008, at 09:46 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 15-16 from:
'''I want to make my own Arduino boards; what should I do?'''
to:
'''I want to design my own board; what should I do?'''
July 02, 2008, at 09:46 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 9-10 from:
See the [[howto]] for options, which includes [[Buy | buying]] a board, or building your own from the files information on the [[hardware]] page.
to:
You can buy an Arduino board from one of the distributors listed on the [[Buy | buy]] page. If you'd prefer to build your own, see the [[ArduinoBoardSerialSingleSided3 | Arduino Single-Sided Serial board]], which can be easily etched and assembled.
July 02, 2008, at 09:44 PM by David A. Mellis -
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!!Arduino Frequently Asked Questions
to:
!!Frequently Asked Questions
July 02, 2008, at 09:44 PM by David A. Mellis -
Deleted lines 2-3:
!!!General
July 02, 2008, at 09:44 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 37-42 from:
These questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].

!!!Development
'''How do I burn the bootloader onto my board?'''

See the [[Hacking/Bootloader | bootloader page]] for details on burning the bootloader onto an Arduino board.
to:
These questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].
July 02, 2008, at 09:43 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 23-24 from:
If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will help people identify you with your products and allow you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just borrow the name of your pet or a character from a novel. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team. Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "-duino" suffix, its use causing Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible). So you might want to avoid it.
to:
If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will help people identify you with your products and allow you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just borrow the name of your pet or a character from a novel. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team. Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "duino" suffix, its use causes the Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible). So you might want to avoid it.
July 02, 2008, at 09:42 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 21-22 from:
Also, see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document for information on the use of the "Arduino" tradmark and other guidelines.
to:
'''What should I call my boards?'''

If you're making your own board, come up with your own name! This will help people identify you with your products and allow you to build a brand. Be creative: try to suggest what people might use the board for, or emphasize the form factor, or just borrow the name of your pet or a character from a novel. "Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants. If you're interested in having your design included in the official Arduino product line, please see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document and contact the Arduino team. Note that while we don't attempt to restrict uses of the "-duino" suffix, its use causing Italians on the team to cringe (apparently it sounds terrible). So you might want to avoid it.
March 31, 2008, at 05:49 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 19-20 from:
Check out the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document for information and guidelines.
to:
The reference designs for the Arduino boards are available from the [[Hardware | hardware]] page. They're licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license, so you are free to use and adapt them for your own needs without asking permission or paying a fee. If you're looking to make something of interest to the community, we'd encourage you to discuss your ideas on the [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?board=hwdev | hardware development forum]] so that potential users can offer suggestions.

Also, see the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document for information on the use of the "Arduino" tradmark and other guidelines.
March 04, 2008, at 04:05 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 28-29 from:
In fact, you already are; the Arduino language is merely a set of C/C++ functions that can be called from your code. Your sketch undergoes minor changes (e.g. automatic generation of function prototypes) and then is passed directly to a C/C++ compiler (avr-g++). For more details, see the page on the [[Hacking/BuildProcess | Arduino build process]].
to:
In fact, you already are; the Arduino language is merely a set of C/C++ functions that can be called from your code. Your sketch undergoes minor changes (e.g. automatic generation of function prototypes) and then is passed directly to a C/C++ compiler (avr-g++). All standard C and C++ constructs [[http://www.nongnu.org/avr-libc/user-manual/FAQ.html#faq_cplusplus | supported by avr-g++]] should work in Arduino. For more details, see the page on the [[Hacking/BuildProcess | Arduino build process]].
March 04, 2008, at 04:04 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 26-31:
'''Can I program the Arduino board in C?'''

In fact, you already are; the Arduino language is merely a set of C/C++ functions that can be called from your code. Your sketch undergoes minor changes (e.g. automatic generation of function prototypes) and then is passed directly to a C/C++ compiler (avr-g++). For more details, see the page on the [[Hacking/BuildProcess | Arduino build process]].

It is also possible to compile programs for the Arduino using a [[Hacking/CommandLine | Makefile and the command line]].
January 18, 2008, at 04:05 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
See the [[howto]] for options, which includes [[Buy | buying]] a board, a [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Main/SimilarBoards| compatible]], or building your own from the files information on the [[hardware]] page.
to:
See the [[howto]] for options, which includes [[Buy | buying]] a board, or building your own from the files information on the [[hardware]] page.
January 18, 2008, at 12:58 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
See the [[howto]] for options, which includes [[Buy | buying]] a board, or a [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Main/SimilarBoards| compatible]] or building your own from the files information on the [[hardware]] page.
to:
See the [[howto]] for options, which includes [[Buy | buying]] a board, a [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Main/SimilarBoards| compatible]], or building your own from the files information on the [[hardware]] page.
January 18, 2008, at 12:57 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
See the [[howto]] for options, which includes [[Buy | buying]] a board or building your own from the files information on the [[hardware]] page.
to:
See the [[howto]] for options, which includes [[Buy | buying]] a board, or a [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Main/SimilarBoards| compatible]] or building your own from the files information on the [[hardware]] page.
December 20, 2007, at 12:50 AM by David A. Mellis - adding license info
Added lines 13-16:
'''Is Arduino open-source?'''

Yes. The source code for the Java environment is released under the GPL, the C/C++ microcontroller libraries under the LGPL, and the schematics and CAD files under Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike licenses.
December 14, 2007, at 05:33 AM by David A. Mellis - adding link to "so you want to make an arduino"
Added lines 13-16:
'''I want to make my own Arduino boards; what should I do?'''

Check out the [[Main/Policy | So you want to make an Arduino]] document for information and guidelines.
November 08, 2007, at 08:03 PM by Limor Fried -
Added lines 5-8:
'''What is an Arduino?'''

Glad you asked, we have a great introduction page on Arduino, [[http://www.arduino.cc/en/Guide/Introduction | click here to read it.]]
Changed lines 11-12 from:
See the [[howto]] for options, which include [[Buy | buying]] a board or building your own from the information on the [[hardware]] page.
to:
See the [[howto]] for options, which includes [[Buy | buying]] a board or building your own from the files information on the [[hardware]] page.
December 21, 2006, at 06:53 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 12-13 from:
See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Gentoo | for Gentoo Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | for Linux]], or [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information. Or, you can [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/CommandLine | use Arduino from the command line]], and not have to install Java.
to:
See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Ubuntu | for Ubuntu Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Gentoo | for Gentoo Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | for Linux]], or [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information. Or, you can [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/CommandLine | use Arduino from the command line]], and not have to install Java.
December 21, 2006, at 06:53 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed line 20 from:
See the [[Bootloader | bootloader page]] for details on burning the bootloader onto an Arduino board.
to:
See the [[Hacking/Bootloader | bootloader page]] for details on burning the bootloader onto an Arduino board.
November 04, 2006, at 05:16 PM by David A. Mellis - deleting troubleshooting questions and point to troubleshooting in the guide
Changed lines 15-142 from:

[[#power]]
'''What if my board doesn't turn on (the green power LED doesn't light up)?'''

If you're using a USB board, make sure that the jumper (little plastic piece near the USB plug) is on the correct pins. If you're powering the board with an external power supply (plugged into the power plug), the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the power plug. If you're powering the board through the USB, the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the USB plug. This picture shows the arrangment for powering the board from the USB port.

Attach:jumper.jpg

(thanks to mrbbp for report and picture)

[[#startup]]
'''The Arduino software won't run on Intel Mac machines.'''

Arduino 0003 uses a native library for doing serial communication that was only compiled for PPC. You'll need to build your own version of [[http://rxtx.org/ | RXTX]]. See [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1143997120 | this forum thread]] for more details.

Arduino 0004 includes a universal version of the RXTX library and should run without modifications on Intel Mac machines. Please report success or failure to the [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1143997120 | forum]].

'''What do to if I get the following error when launching arduino.exe on Windows?'''

@@Arduino has encountered a problem and needs to close.@@

You'll need to launch Arduino using the run.bat file. Please be patient, the Arduino IDE may take some time to open.

'''Arduino 0005 won't start on Mac OS X.'''

Check your console log (Applications > Utilities > Console). If you see a message like "unsupported major.minor version 49.0", your Java is too old. Run Software Update to upgrade to the latest version.

'''Why won't Arduino run on old versions of Mac OS X?'''

If you get an error like this:

@@Link (dyld) error:

dyld: /Applications/arduino-0004/Arduino 04.app/Contents/MacOS/Arduino Undefined symbols:
/Applications/arduino-0004/librxtxSerial.jnilib undefined reference to _printf$LDBL128 expected to be defined in /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib @@

you probably need to upgrade to Max OS X 10.3.9 or later. Older versions have incompatible versions of some system libraries.

Thanks to Gabe462 for the report.

'''What do I do if I get the following error when launching Arduino?'''

@@Uncaught exception in main method: java.lang.UnsatisfiedLinkError: Native Library /Users/anu/Desktop/arduino-0002/librxtxSerial.jnilib already loaded in another classloader@@

You probably have an old version of the communications library lying around. Search for comm.jar or jcl.jar in /System/Library/Frameworks/JavaVM.framework/ or in directories in your CLASSPATH or PATH environment variables. (reported by Anurag Sehgal)

'''What about this error?'''

@@Java Virtual Machine Launcher: Could not find the main class. Program will exit.@@

Make sure that you correctly extracted the contents of the Arduino .zip file - in particular that the '''lib''' directory is directly inside of the Arduino directory and contains the file '''pde.jar'''.

[[#serialport]]
'''Why doesn't my board show in the Tools | Serial Port menu ?'''

If you're using a USB Arduino board, make sure you installed the FTDI drivers (see the [[Howto]] for directions). If you're using a USB-to-Serial adapter with a serial board, make sure you installed its drivers.

Make sure that the board is plugged in: the serial port menu refreshes whenever you open the '''Tools''' menu, so if you just unplugged the board, it won't be in the menu.

Check that you're not running any programs that scan all serial ports, like PDA sync applications, Bluetooth-USB drivers (e.g. BlueSoleil), virtual daemon tools, etc.

On Windows, the COM port assigned to the board may be too high. From zeveland:

"One little note if you aren't able to export and your USB board is trying to use a high COM port number: try changing the FTDI chip's COM port assignment to a lower one.

"I had a bunch of virtual COM ports set up for Bluetooth so the board was set to use COM17. The IDE wasn't able to find the board so I deleted the other virtual ports in Control Panel (on XP) and moved the FTDI's assignment down to COM2. Make sure to set Arduino to use the new port and good luck."

On the Mac, if you have an old version of the FTDI drivers, you may need to remove them and reinstall the latest version. See [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1143197735 | this forum thread for directions]] (thanks to gck).

[[#upload]]
'''Why I can't upload my programs to the Arduino board?'''

There are a few things that could be wrong.

* First make sure your board is on (the green LED is on) and connected to the computer (if it's not, see "what if my board doesn't turn on" above).

* Then, check that the proper port is selected in the "Tools | Serial Port" menu (if your port doesn't appear, restart the IDE with the board connected to the computer).

* Make sure there's a bootloader burned on the Atmega8 on your Arduino board. To check, connect an LED to pin 13 and reset the board. The LED should blink. If it doesn't, see the [[Bootloader]] page for instructions on burning a bootloader to the board.

* Be sure that you are resetting the board a couple of seconds before uploading.

* Also, on the serial boards, be sure that digital pins 0 and 1 are not connected to anything while uploading (they can connected and used after the code has been uploaded).

* If you get this error: @@[VP 1] Device is not responding correctly.@@ try uploading again (i.e. reset the board and press the download button a second time).

* Check that you're not running any programs that scan all serial ports, like PDA sync applications, Bluetooth-USB drivers (e.g. BlueSoleil), virtual daemon tools, etc.

* Make sure you don't have firewall software that blocks access to the serial port (e.g. ZoneAlarm).

* You may need to quit Processing, PD, vvvv, etc. if you're using them to read data over the USB or serial connection to the Arduino board.

* Or (especially on Intel Macs), the bootloader on the Arduino board might time out before the compilation of the new sketch finishes and the upload begins. Here's plaidTortoise's fix: "To get it to work I hold down the reset button, click the Upload button and wait a couple of seconds. Then I release the button and a second or so later both the TX and RX Leds on the board light up and both start flashing. The upload then occurs."

* You may need change the baud rate at which sketches are uploaded. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (MOST OF -but not all- version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). You will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. See the [[preferences]] page for instructions on finding the file. Look for the file in your computer and change the '''serial.download_rate''' property to match the one in your board. Though this is a trick to fix this issue, it is recommended to upgrade the bootloader, the one that downloads always at 19200. This can be done with the '''Tools | Burn Bootloader'' menu item.

'''What if I get this error when uploading code or using the serial monitor (on the Mac)?'''

[@
Error inside Serial.<init>()
gnu.io.PortInUseException: Unknown Application
at gnu.io.CommPortIdentifier.open(CommPortIdentifier.java:354)
at processing.app.Serial.<init>(Serial.java:127)
at processing.app.Serial.<init>(Serial.java:72)
@]

You need to run the @@macosx_setup.command@@ in the Arduino directory, and then restart your computer. Arduino 0004 includes a modified version of this script that all users need to run (even those who ran the one that came with Arduino 0003). You may also need to delete the contents of the '''/var/spool/uucp''' directory.

'''Why does my sketch appear to upload successfully but not do anything?'''

The sketch may be too big for the board. When uploading your sketch, Arduino 0004 checks if it's too big for the ATmega8, but it bases its calculation on a 1 Kb bootloader. You may have a older bootloader that takes up 2 Kb of the 8 Kb of program space (flash) on the ATmega8 instead of the 1 Kb used by the current bootloader. If yours is bigger, only part of the sketch will be uploaded, but the software won't know, and your board will continually reset, pause, reset.

If you have access to an AVR-ISP or parallel port programmer, you can burn the latest version of the bootloader to your board with the '''Tools | Burn Bootloader''' menu item. Otherwise, you can tell the Arduino environment the amount of space available for sketches by editing the upload.maximum_size variable in your preferences file (see: [[Preferences | instructions on finding the file]]). Change 7168 to 6144, and the environment should correctly warn you when your sketch is too big.

'''How can I reduce the size of my sketch?'''

The ATmega8 chip on the Arduino board is cheap, but it has only 8 Kb of program code, which isn't very much (and 1 Kb is used by the bootloader).

If you're using floating point, try to rewrite your code with integer math, which should save you about 2 Kb. Delete any '''#include''' statements at the top of your sketch for libraries that you're not using.

Otherwise, see if you can make your program shorter.

In new releases of the software, we'll try to make more efficient use of the program space and give an error message if your program is too big.

'''Why don't I get a PWM (an analog output) when I call analogWrite() on pins other than 9, 10, or 11?'''

The microcontroller on the Arduino board (the atmega8) only supports PWM/analogWrite() on certain pins. Calling analogWrite() on any other pins will give high (5 volts) for values greater than 128 and low (0 volts) for values less than 128.
to:
These questions have moved to the [[Guide/Troubleshooting | troubleshooting]] section of the Arduino [[Guide/HomePage | guide]].

!!!Development
October 06, 2006, at 01:07 AM by David A. Mellis - adding link to command line instructions
Changed lines 12-13 from:
See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Gentoo | for Gentoo Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | for Linux]], or [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information.
to:
See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Gentoo | for Gentoo Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | for Linux]], or [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information. Or, you can [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/CommandLine | use Arduino from the command line]], and not have to install Java.
September 17, 2006, at 07:54 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added line 9:
[[#linux]]
Added line 16:
[[#power]]
Added line 25:
[[#startup]]
Added line 67:
[[#serialport]]
Added line 84:
[[#upload]]
September 14, 2006, at 08:45 AM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 35-36 from:
'''Arduino won't start on Mac OS X.'''
to:
'''Arduino 0005 won't start on Mac OS X.'''
September 12, 2006, at 10:06 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 98-99:
* Make sure you don't have firewall software that blocks access to the serial port (e.g. ZoneAlarm).
September 04, 2006, at 04:36 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 35-38:
'''Arduino won't start on Mac OS X.'''

Check your console log (Applications > Utilities > Console). If you see a message like "unsupported major.minor version 49.0", your Java is too old. Run Software Update to upgrade to the latest version.
September 04, 2006, at 01:38 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 94-95:
* You may need to quit Processing, PD, vvvv, etc. if you're using them to read data over the USB or serial connection to the Arduino board.
September 03, 2006, at 07:45 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 92-93:
* Check that you're not running any programs that scan all serial ports, like PDA sync applications, Bluetooth-USB drivers (e.g. BlueSoleil), virtual daemon tools, etc.
August 27, 2006, at 01:16 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://jeremah.co.uk/linux/arduino_on_gentoo.html | for Gentoo Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | for Linux]], or [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information.
to:
See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Gentoo | for Gentoo Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | for Linux]], or [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information.
August 27, 2006, at 11:14 AM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://jeremah.co.uk/linux/arduino_on_gentoo.html | for Gentoo Linux]], for [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information.
to:
See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://jeremah.co.uk/linux/arduino_on_gentoo.html | for Gentoo Linux]], [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Learning/Linux | for Linux]], or [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information.
August 27, 2006, at 11:13 AM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://jeremah.co.uk/linux/arduino_on_gentoo.html fo Gentoo Linux]], for [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information.
to:
See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://jeremah.co.uk/linux/arduino_on_gentoo.html | for Gentoo Linux]], for [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information.
August 27, 2006, at 11:13 AM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
See [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] for instructions on getting Arduino to run in Debian. Those of you crazy enough to run Linux on PPC hardware should see [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | this thread]]. For Gentoo, see [[http://jeremah.co.uk/linux/arduino_on_gentoo.html | these instructions]] from Jonny Stutters.
to:
See instructions [[http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Linux/Debian | for Debian Linux]], [[http://jeremah.co.uk/linux/arduino_on_gentoo.html fo Gentoo Linux]], for [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | for Linux on PPC]]. This [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] has more information.
July 08, 2006, at 03:57 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 92-93 from:
* Or, the bootloader on the Arduino board might time out before the compilation of the new sketch finishes and the upload begins. Here's plaidTortoise's fix: "To get it to work I hold down the reset button, click the Upload button and wait a couple of seconds. Then I release the button and a second or so later both the TX and RX Leds on the board light up and both start flashing. The upload then occurs."
to:
* Or (especially on Intel Macs), the bootloader on the Arduino board might time out before the compilation of the new sketch finishes and the upload begins. Here's plaidTortoise's fix: "To get it to work I hold down the reset button, click the Upload button and wait a couple of seconds. Then I release the button and a second or so later both the TX and RX Leds on the board light up and both start flashing. The upload then occurs."
May 19, 2006, at 10:47 AM by David A. Mellis - adding info about old vs. new bootloader (1kb vs 2kb)
Added lines 108-113:
'''Why does my sketch appear to upload successfully but not do anything?'''

The sketch may be too big for the board. When uploading your sketch, Arduino 0004 checks if it's too big for the ATmega8, but it bases its calculation on a 1 Kb bootloader. You may have a older bootloader that takes up 2 Kb of the 8 Kb of program space (flash) on the ATmega8 instead of the 1 Kb used by the current bootloader. If yours is bigger, only part of the sketch will be uploaded, but the software won't know, and your board will continually reset, pause, reset.

If you have access to an AVR-ISP or parallel port programmer, you can burn the latest version of the bootloader to your board with the '''Tools | Burn Bootloader''' menu item. Otherwise, you can tell the Arduino environment the amount of space available for sketches by editing the upload.maximum_size variable in your preferences file (see: [[Preferences | instructions on finding the file]]). Change 7168 to 6144, and the environment should correctly warn you when your sketch is too big.
May 08, 2006, at 02:10 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 35-47:
'''Why won't Arduino run on old versions of Mac OS X?'''

If you get an error like this:

@@Link (dyld) error:

dyld: /Applications/arduino-0004/Arduino 04.app/Contents/MacOS/Arduino Undefined symbols:
/Applications/arduino-0004/librxtxSerial.jnilib undefined reference to _printf$LDBL128 expected to be defined in /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib @@

you probably need to upgrade to Max OS X 10.3.9 or later. Older versions have incompatible versions of some system libraries.

Thanks to Gabe462 for the report.
May 03, 2006, at 11:53 AM by David A. Mellis - Addding "count not find the main class" error.
Changed lines 27-28 from:
'''What do to if I get the following error when launching arduino.exe on Windows? (how to use run.bat)'''
to:
Arduino 0004 includes a universal version of the RXTX library and should run without modifications on Intel Mac machines. Please report success or failure to the [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1143997120 | forum]].

'''What do to if I get the following error when launching arduino.exe on Windows?'''
Added lines 41-46:
'''What about this error?'''

@@Java Virtual Machine Launcher: Could not find the main class. Program will exit.@@

Make sure that you correctly extracted the contents of the Arduino .zip file - in particular that the '''lib''' directory is directly inside of the Arduino directory and contains the file '''pde.jar'''.
May 02, 2006, at 12:15 PM by David A. Mellis - Adding timeout problem.
Added lines 71-72:
* Or, the bootloader on the Arduino board might time out before the compilation of the new sketch finishes and the upload begins. Here's plaidTortoise's fix: "To get it to work I hold down the reset button, click the Upload button and wait a couple of seconds. Then I release the button and a second or so later both the TX and RX Leds on the board light up and both start flashing. The upload then occurs."
May 01, 2006, at 03:53 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 85-88 from:
'''My code appears to upload correctly, but doesn't run.'''

Your program is probably too big for the Arduino board. The ATmega8 chip has only 8 Kb of program code, which isn't very much (and 1 Kb is used by the bootloader). If you're using floating point, try to rewrite your code with integer math, which should save you about 2 Kb. Otherwise, see if you can make your program shorter. This is one of the limitations that we have to deal with in order to make the Arduino board as cheap as possible. In new releases of the software, we'll try to make more efficient use of the program space and give an error message if your program is too big.
to:
'''How can I reduce the size of my sketch?'''

The ATmega8 chip on the Arduino board is cheap, but it has only 8 Kb of program code, which isn't very much (and 1 Kb is used by the bootloader).

If you're using floating point, try to rewrite your code with integer math, which should save you about 2 Kb. Delete any '''#include''' statements at the top of your sketch for libraries that you're not using.

Otherwise, see if you can make your program shorter.

In new releases of the software, we'll try to make more efficient use of the program space and give an error message if your program is too big.
May 01, 2006, at 03:50 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 9-10 from:
'''How can I run the Arduino IDE under Linx?'''
to:
'''How can I run the Arduino IDE under Linux?'''
May 01, 2006, at 03:49 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 71-72 from:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected. If you run '''Arduino-0002''' or older: in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (MOST OF -but not all- version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). You will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. See the [[preferences]] page for instructions on finding the file. Look for the file in your computer and change the '''serial.download_rate''' property to match the one in your board. As explained earlier, some older boards still download programs at the speed of 9600. Newer boards use 19200. Though this is a trick to fix this issue, it is recommended to upgrade the bootloader, the one that downloads always at 19200. This can be done with the '''Tools | Burn Bootloader'' menu item.
to:
* You may need change the baud rate at which sketches are uploaded. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (MOST OF -but not all- version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). You will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. See the [[preferences]] page for instructions on finding the file. Look for the file in your computer and change the '''serial.download_rate''' property to match the one in your board. Though this is a trick to fix this issue, it is recommended to upgrade the bootloader, the one that downloads always at 19200. This can be done with the '''Tools | Burn Bootloader'' menu item.
May 01, 2006, at 03:46 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 31-40 from:
You'll need to launch Arduino using the run.bat file. To do so, you'll need to change the line that reads:

@@set JAVA_HOME=""@@

to:

set JAVA_HOME="java\bin"

Thanks to Tom Igoe for the bug report.
to:
You'll need to launch Arduino using the run.bat file. Please be patient, the Arduino IDE may take some time to open.
May 01, 2006, at 03:45 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 91-92 from:
You need to run the @@macosx_setup.command@@ in the Arduino directory, and then restart your computer. You may also need to delete the contents of the '''/var/spool/uucp''' directory.
to:
You need to run the @@macosx_setup.command@@ in the Arduino directory, and then restart your computer. Arduino 0004 includes a modified version of this script that all users need to run (even those who ran the one that came with Arduino 0003). You may also need to delete the contents of the '''/var/spool/uucp''' directory.
May 01, 2006, at 03:42 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 79-84 from:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected. If you run '''Arduino-0002''' or older: in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (MOST OF -but not all- version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). You will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. See the [[preferences]] page for instructions on finding the file.

Look for the file in your computer and change the '''serial.download_rate''' property to match the one in your board. As explained earlier, some older boards still download programs at the speed of 9600. Newer boards use 19200.

Though this is a trick to fix this issue, it is recommended to upgrade the bootloader, the one that downloads always at 19200. This can be done with the '''Tools | Burn Bootloader'' menu item.
to:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected. If you run '''Arduino-0002''' or older: in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (MOST OF -but not all- version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). You will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. See the [[preferences]] page for instructions on finding the file. Look for the file in your computer and change the '''serial.download_rate''' property to match the one in your board. As explained earlier, some older boards still download programs at the speed of 9600. Newer boards use 19200. Though this is a trick to fix this issue, it is recommended to upgrade the bootloader, the one that downloads always at 19200. This can be done with the '''Tools | Burn Bootloader'' menu item.
May 01, 2006, at 03:42 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 79-80 from:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected. If you run '''Arduino-0002''' or older: in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (MOST OF -but not all- version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). If you run '''Arduino-0003''', you will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. See the [[preferences]] page for instructions on finding the file.
to:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected. If you run '''Arduino-0002''' or older: in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (MOST OF -but not all- version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). You will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. See the [[preferences]] page for instructions on finding the file.
Changed lines 95-96 from:
You need to run the @@macosx_setup.command@@ in the Arduino directory, and then restart your computer.
to:
You need to run the @@macosx_setup.command@@ in the Arduino directory, and then restart your computer. You may also need to delete the contents of the '''/var/spool/uucp''' directory.
Changed lines 101-108 from:
'''Why am I getting garbage data from analogRead()?'''

Try flipping the pin without changing the code (e.g. if you call analogRead(0), use analog input pin 5 instead of 0).

Explanation: On the newer versions of the board, the order of the analog input pins was reversed but version 0002 of the software was not updated along with it. This has been fixed in version 0003.

'''Why don't I get a PWM (an analog output) when I call analogWrite() on pins other than 9 or 10?'''
to:
'''Why don't I get a PWM (an analog output) when I call analogWrite() on pins other than 9, 10, or 11?'''
Changed lines 105-107 from:
'''How do I burn the bootloader onto my board? Why doesn't burn.bat work on Windows?'''

See the [[Bootloader | bootloader page]] for details on burning the bootloader onto an Arduino board, including corrected scripts for Windows.
to:
'''How do I burn the bootloader onto my board?'''

See the [[Bootloader | bootloader page]] for details on burning the bootloader onto an Arduino board.
May 01, 2006, at 03:38 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 79-86 from:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected. If you run '''Arduino-0002''' or older: in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (MOST OF -but not all- version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). If you run '''Arduino-0003''', you will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. See the [[preferences]]] page for instructions on finding the file.

Look for the file in your computer and change the '''serial.download_rate''' property to match the one in your board. As explained earlier, some older boards still download programs at the speed of 9600.

Attach:2006019_serial3.png

This is the property you will have to tune: 9600 for old boards, 19200 (as shown in the picture) for new boards. Though this is a trick to fix this issue, it is recommended to upgrade the bootloader to version 4, the one that downloads always at 19200. The file to do this is included in the '''Arduino-0003''' distribution.
to:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected. If you run '''Arduino-0002''' or older: in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (MOST OF -but not all- version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). If you run '''Arduino-0003''', you will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. See the [[preferences]] page for instructions on finding the file.

Look for the file in your computer and change the '''serial.download_rate''' property to match the one in your board. As explained earlier, some older boards still download programs at the speed of 9600. Newer boards use 19200.

Though this is a trick to fix this issue, it is recommended to upgrade the bootloader, the one that downloads always at 19200. This can be done with the '''Tools | Burn Bootloader'' menu item.
May 01, 2006, at 03:34 PM by David A. Mellis - Removing some preferences screenshots.
Changed lines 79-90 from:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected. If you run '''Arduino-0002''' or older: in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (MOST OF -but not all- version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). If you run '''Arduino-0003''', you will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. The following picture sequence explains how to find this:

Attach:2006019_serial1.png

''Figure 1: looking for the preferences''

In the '''File-->Preferences''' submenu you will open a pop-up window that contains the path for the preferences file in your system (note that the path in the picture belongs to the computer where we made the test, '''it will for sure be different in your machine''' - the other issue is that on Windows the file may be in a hidden folder).

Attach:2006019_serial2.png

''Figure 2: the path is indicated in the pop-up''
to:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected. If you run '''Arduino-0002''' or older: in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (MOST OF -but not all- version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). If you run '''Arduino-0003''', you will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. See the [[preferences]]] page for instructions on finding the file.
Deleted lines 84-85:
''Figure 3: change the serial.download_rate property''
April 21, 2006, at 03:03 PM by David A. Mellis - linking to gentoo instructions
Changed lines 11-12 from:
See [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] for instructions on getting Arduino to run in Debian. Those of you crazy enough to run Linux on PPC hardware should see [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | this thread]].
to:
See [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] for instructions on getting Arduino to run in Debian. Those of you crazy enough to run Linux on PPC hardware should see [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | this thread]]. For Gentoo, see [[http://jeremah.co.uk/linux/arduino_on_gentoo.html | these instructions]] from Jonny Stutters.
April 09, 2006, at 04:41 PM by David A. Mellis - Added more details about serial port not showing up.
Changed lines 49-50 from:
First, make sure you're not running any programs that scan all serial ports, like PDA sync applications, Bluetooth-USB drivers (e.g. BlueSoleil), virtual daemon tools, etc.
to:
If you're using a USB Arduino board, make sure you installed the FTDI drivers (see the [[Howto]] for directions). If you're using a USB-to-Serial adapter with a serial board, make sure you installed its drivers.

Make sure that the board is plugged in: the serial port menu refreshes whenever you open the '''Tools''' menu, so if you just unplugged the board, it won't be in the menu.

Check that you're not running any programs that scan all serial ports, like PDA sync applications, Bluetooth-USB drivers (e.g. BlueSoleil), virtual daemon tools, etc.
April 09, 2006, at 03:33 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 23-26:
'''The Arduino software won't run on Intel Mac machines.'''

Arduino 0003 uses a native library for doing serial communication that was only compiled for PPC. You'll need to build your own version of [[http://rxtx.org/ | RXTX]]. See [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1143997120 | this forum thread]] for more details.
April 09, 2006, at 03:28 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 91-102:
'''What if I get this error when uploading code or using the serial monitor (on the Mac)?'''

[@
Error inside Serial.<init>()
gnu.io.PortInUseException: Unknown Application
at gnu.io.CommPortIdentifier.open(CommPortIdentifier.java:354)
at processing.app.Serial.<init>(Serial.java:127)
at processing.app.Serial.<init>(Serial.java:72)
@]

You need to run the @@macosx_setup.command@@ in the Arduino directory, and then restart your computer.
April 09, 2006, at 03:05 PM by David A. Mellis -
Added lines 45-46:
First, make sure you're not running any programs that scan all serial ports, like PDA sync applications, Bluetooth-USB drivers (e.g. BlueSoleil), virtual daemon tools, etc.
Added lines 63-70:
* Make sure there's a bootloader burned on the Atmega8 on your Arduino board. To check, connect an LED to pin 13 and reset the board. The LED should blink. If it doesn't, see the [[Bootloader]] page for instructions on burning a bootloader to the board.

* Be sure that you are resetting the board a couple of seconds before uploading.

* Also, on the serial boards, be sure that digital pins 0 and 1 are not connected to anything while uploading (they can connected and used after the code has been uploaded).

* If you get this error: @@[VP 1] Device is not responding correctly.@@ try uploading again (i.e. reset the board and press the download button a second time).
Deleted lines 90-97:
* Make sure there's a bootloader burned on the Atmega8 on your Arduino board. To check, connect an LED to pin 13 and reset the board. The LED should blink. If it doesn't, see the [[Bootloader]] page for instructions on burning a bootloader to the board.

* Be sure that you are resetting the board a couple of seconds before uploading.

* Also, on the serial boards, be sure that digital pins 0 and 1 are not connected to anything while uploading (they can connected and used after the code has been uploaded).

* If you get this error: @@[VP 1] Device is not responding correctly.@@ try uploading again (i.e. reset the board and press the download button a second time).
March 25, 2006, at 04:50 PM by David A. Mellis - Added link to Mac FTDI driver removal and reinstall.
March 25, 2006, at 04:50 PM by David A. Mellis - Added link to FTDI driver removal and reinstall.
Changed lines 43-46 from:
'''Why doesn't my board show in the Tools | Serial Port menu on Windows?'''

The COM port assigned to the board may be too high. From zeveland:
to:
'''Why doesn't my board show in the Tools | Serial Port menu ?'''

On Windows, the COM port assigned to the board may be too high. From zeveland:
Added lines 51-52:
On the Mac, if you have an old version of the FTDI drivers, you may need to remove them and reinstall the latest version. See [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1143197735 | this forum thread for directions]] (thanks to gck).
March 15, 2006, at 10:38 AM by David A. Mellis - Fixed Linux forum thread links.
Changed lines 11-12 from:
See [[http://arduino.berlios.de/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=swtrouble;action=display;num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] for instructions on getting Arduino to run in Debian. Those of you crazy enough to run Linux on PPC hardware should see [[http://arduino.berlios.de/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=swtrouble;action=display;num=1141345598 | this thread]].
to:
See [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] for instructions on getting Arduino to run in Debian. Those of you crazy enough to run Linux on PPC hardware should see [[http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1141345598 | this thread]].
March 06, 2006, at 11:16 PM by 82.186.237.10 -
Added lines 9-12:
'''How can I run the Arduino IDE under Linx?'''

See [[http://arduino.berlios.de/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=swtrouble;action=display;num=1129025529 | this forum thread]] for instructions on getting Arduino to run in Debian. Those of you crazy enough to run Linux on PPC hardware should see [[http://arduino.berlios.de/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=swtrouble;action=display;num=1141345598 | this thread]].
February 25, 2006, at 11:37 AM by 82.186.237.10 -
Added lines 39-46:
'''Why doesn't my board show in the Tools | Serial Port menu on Windows?'''

The COM port assigned to the board may be too high. From zeveland:

"One little note if you aren't able to export and your USB board is trying to use a high COM port number: try changing the FTDI chip's COM port assignment to a lower one.

"I had a bunch of virtual COM ports set up for Bluetooth so the board was set to use COM17. The IDE wasn't able to find the board so I deleted the other virtual ports in Control Panel (on XP) and moved the FTDI's assignment down to COM2. Make sure to set Arduino to use the new port and good luck."
February 12, 2006, at 06:54 PM by 85.18.81.162 -
Added lines 75-78:
'''My code appears to upload correctly, but doesn't run.'''

Your program is probably too big for the Arduino board. The ATmega8 chip has only 8 Kb of program code, which isn't very much (and 1 Kb is used by the bootloader). If you're using floating point, try to rewrite your code with integer math, which should save you about 2 Kb. Otherwise, see if you can make your program shorter. This is one of the limitations that we have to deal with in order to make the Arduino board as cheap as possible. In new releases of the software, we'll try to make more efficient use of the program space and give an error message if your program is too big.
February 04, 2006, at 11:14 PM by 82.186.237.10 -
Changed lines 19-20 from:
'''What do to if I get the following error when launching arduino.exe on Windows? (how to use run.bat)"
to:
'''What do to if I get the following error when launching arduino.exe on Windows? (how to use run.bat)'''
February 04, 2006, at 11:12 PM by 82.186.237.10 -
Added lines 19-32:
'''What do to if I get the following error when launching arduino.exe on Windows? (how to use run.bat)"

@@Arduino has encountered a problem and needs to close.@@

You'll need to launch Arduino using the run.bat file. To do so, you'll need to change the line that reads:

@@set JAVA_HOME=""@@

to:

set JAVA_HOME="java\bin"

Thanks to Tom Igoe for the bug report.
January 27, 2006, at 11:55 AM by 85.18.81.162 -
Changed lines 69-73 from:
The microcontroller on the Arduino board (the atmega8) only supports PWM/analogWrite() on certain pins. Calling analogWrite() on any other pins will give high (5 volts) for values greater than 128 and low (0 volts) for values less than 128.
to:
The microcontroller on the Arduino board (the atmega8) only supports PWM/analogWrite() on certain pins. Calling analogWrite() on any other pins will give high (5 volts) for values greater than 128 and low (0 volts) for values less than 128.

'''How do I burn the bootloader onto my board? Why doesn't burn.bat work on Windows?'''

See the [[Bootloader | bootloader page]] for details on burning the bootloader onto an Arduino board, including corrected scripts for Windows.
January 25, 2006, at 12:23 PM by 81.236.128.105 -
Changed lines 39-40 from:
In the '''File-->Preferences''' submenu you will open a pop-up window that contains the path for the preferences file in your system (note that the path in the picture belongs to the computer where we made the test, '''it will for sure be different in your machine''').
to:
In the '''File-->Preferences''' submenu you will open a pop-up window that contains the path for the preferences file in your system (note that the path in the picture belongs to the computer where we made the test, '''it will for sure be different in your machine''' - the other issue is that on Windows the file may be in a hidden folder).
January 25, 2006, at 12:16 PM by 81.236.128.105 -
Deleted lines 44-45:
(note: the properties file will state in the beginning that you shouldn't edit it, do not follow that indication this time)
January 25, 2006, at 12:11 PM by 81.236.128.105 -
Changed lines 33-34 from:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected. If you run '''Arduino-0002''' or older: in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). If you run '''Arduino-0003''', you will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. The following picture sequence explains how to find this:
to:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected. If you run '''Arduino-0002''' or older: in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (MOST OF -but not all- version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). If you run '''Arduino-0003''', you will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. The following picture sequence explains how to find this:
Changed lines 39-40 from:
In the '''File-->Preferences''' submenu you will open a pop-up window that contains the path for the preferences file in your system.
to:
In the '''File-->Preferences''' submenu you will open a pop-up window that contains the path for the preferences file in your system (note that the path in the picture belongs to the computer where we made the test, '''it will for sure be different in your machine''').
Added lines 45-46:
(note: the properties file will state in the beginning that you shouldn't edit it, do not follow that indication this time)
Changed lines 53-54 from:
This is the property you will have to tune: 9600 for old boards, 19200 (as shown in the picture) for new boards. Though this is a trick to fix this issue, it is recommended to upgrade the bootloader to version 4, the one that downloads always at 19200. The file to do this is included in the '''Arduino-0003''' distribution.
to:
This is the property you will have to tune: 9600 for old boards, 19200 (as shown in the picture) for new boards. Though this is a trick to fix this issue, it is recommended to upgrade the bootloader to version 4, the one that downloads always at 19200. The file to do this is included in the '''Arduino-0003''' distribution.
January 23, 2006, at 11:48 AM by 85.18.81.162 -
Changed lines 13-14 from:
If you're using a USB board, make sure that the jumper (little plastic piece near the USB plug) is on the correct pins. If you're powering the board with an external power supply (plugged into the power plug), the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the power plug. If you're powering the board through the USB, the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the USB plug. (thanks to mrbbp for report and picture)
to:
If you're using a USB board, make sure that the jumper (little plastic piece near the USB plug) is on the correct pins. If you're powering the board with an external power supply (plugged into the power plug), the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the power plug. If you're powering the board through the USB, the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the USB plug. This picture shows the arrangment for powering the board from the USB port.
Added lines 17-18:
(thanks to mrbbp for report and picture)
January 23, 2006, at 11:45 AM by 85.18.81.162 -
Changed lines 13-14 from:
If you're using a USB board, make sure that the jumper (little plastic piece near the USB plug) is on the correct pins. If you're powering the board with an external power supply (plugged into the power plug), the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the power plug. If you're powering the board through the USB, the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the USB plug. (thanks to mrbbp)
to:
If you're using a USB board, make sure that the jumper (little plastic piece near the USB plug) is on the correct pins. If you're powering the board with an external power supply (plugged into the power plug), the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the power plug. If you're powering the board through the USB, the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the USB plug. (thanks to mrbbp for report and picture)

Attach:jumper.jpg
January 20, 2006, at 05:53 PM by 85.18.81.162 -
Added lines 49-50:
* Make sure there's a bootloader burned on the Atmega8 on your Arduino board. To check, connect an LED to pin 13 and reset the board. The LED should blink. If it doesn't, see the [[Bootloader]] page for instructions on burning a bootloader to the board.
January 19, 2006, at 01:02 PM by 85.18.81.162 -
Changed lines 59-60 from:
Explanation: On the newer versions of the board, the order of the analog input pins was reversed but version 0002 of the software was not updated along with it. This should be fixed in version 0003.
to:
Explanation: On the newer versions of the board, the order of the analog input pins was reversed but version 0002 of the software was not updated along with it. This has been fixed in version 0003.
January 19, 2006, at 08:10 AM by 81.236.128.105 -
Changed lines 47-48 from:
Though this is a trick to fix this issue, it is recommended to upgrade the bootloader to version 4, the one that downloads at 19200. The file to do this is included in the '''Arduino-0003''' distribution.
to:
This is the property you will have to tune: 9600 for old boards, 19200 (as shown in the picture) for new boards. Though this is a trick to fix this issue, it is recommended to upgrade the bootloader to version 4, the one that downloads always at 19200. The file to do this is included in the '''Arduino-0003''' distribution.
January 19, 2006, at 08:08 AM by 81.236.128.105 -
Added line 32:
Added line 38:
Changed lines 41-42 from:
Look for the file in your computer and change the '''serial.download_speed''' property to match the one in your board. As explained earlier, some older boards still download programs at the speed of 9600.
to:
Look for the file in your computer and change the '''serial.download_rate''' property to match the one in your board. As explained earlier, some older boards still download programs at the speed of 9600.
Changed lines 44-45 from:
''Figure 3: change the serial.download_speed property''
to:

''Figure 3: change the serial.download_rate property''
January 19, 2006, at 08:07 AM by 81.236.128.105 -
Changed line 31 from:
[Attach:2006019_serial1.png]
to:
Attach:2006019_serial1.png
Changed line 36 from:
[Attach:20060119_serial2.png]
to:
Attach:2006019_serial2.png
Changed line 41 from:
[Attach:20060119_serial3.png]
to:
Attach:2006019_serial3.png
January 19, 2006, at 08:04 AM by 81.236.128.105 -
Changed line 31 from:
[Attach: 2006019_serial1.png]
to:
[Attach:2006019_serial1.png]
Changed line 36 from:
[Attach: 20060119_serial2.png]
to:
[Attach:20060119_serial2.png]
Changed line 41 from:
[Attach: 20060119_serial3.png]
to:
[Attach:20060119_serial3.png]
January 19, 2006, at 08:04 AM by 81.236.128.105 -
Changed lines 29-30 from:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (version 2.0 or greater, and the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX").
to:
* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected. If you run '''Arduino-0002''' or older: in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (version 2.0 or greater, and most of the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). If you run '''Arduino-0003''', you will have to change the speed in the ''preferences'' file directly. The following picture sequence explains how to find this:

[Attach: 2006019_serial1.png]
''Figure 1: looking for the preferences''

In the '''File-->Preferences''' submenu you will open a pop-up window that contains the path for the preferences file in your system.

[Attach: 20060119_serial2.png]
''Figure 2: the path is indicated in the pop-up''

Look for the file in your computer and change the '''serial.download_speed''' property to match the one in your board. As explained earlier, some older boards still download programs at the speed of 9600.

[Attach: 20060119_serial3.png]
''Figure 3: change the serial.download_speed property''

Though this is a trick to fix this issue, it is recommended to upgrade the bootloader to version 4, the one that downloads at 19200. The file to do this is included in the '''Arduino-0003''' distribution.
November 30, 2005, at 11:51 AM by 213.140.6.103 -
Changed lines 23-28 from:
There are a few things that could be wrong. First make sure your board is on (the green LED is on) and connected to the computer (if it's not, see "what if my board doesn't turn on" above). Then, check that the proper port is selected in the "Tools | Serial Port" menu (if your port doesn't appear, restart the IDE with the board connected to the computer). Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (version 2.0 or greater, and the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). Be sure that you are resetting the board a couple of seconds before uploading. Also, on the serial boards, be sure that digital pins 0 and 1 are not connected to anything while uploading (they can connected and used after the code has been uploaded). If you get this error:

@@[VP 1] Device is not responding correctly.@@

trying uploading again (i.e. reset the board and press the download button a second time).
to:
There are a few things that could be wrong.

* First make sure your board is on (the green LED is on) and connected to the computer (if it's not, see "what if my board doesn't turn on" above).

* Then, check that the proper port is selected in the "Tools | Serial Port" menu (if your port doesn't appear, restart the IDE with the board connected to the computer).

* Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (version 2.0 or greater, and the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX").

* Be sure that you are resetting the board a couple of seconds before uploading.

* Also, on the serial boards, be sure that digital pins 0 and 1 are not connected to anything while uploading (they can connected and used after the code has been uploaded).

* If you get this error: @@[VP 1] Device is not responding correctly.@@ try uploading again (i.e. reset the board and press the download button a second time).
November 24, 2005, at 12:58 PM by 213.140.6.103 -
Changed lines 23-24 from:
There are a few things that could be wrong. First make sure your board is on (the green LED is on) and connected to the computer (if it's not, see "what if my board doesn't turn on" above). Then, check that the proper port is selected in the "Tools | Serial Port" menu (if your port doesn't appear, restart the IDE with the board connected to the computer). Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (version 2.0 or greater, and the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). Be sure that you are resetting the board a couple of seconds before uploading. Also, on the serial boards, be sure that digital pins 0 and 1 are not connected to anything while uploading (they can connected and used after the code has been uploaded).
to:
There are a few things that could be wrong. First make sure your board is on (the green LED is on) and connected to the computer (if it's not, see "what if my board doesn't turn on" above). Then, check that the proper port is selected in the "Tools | Serial Port" menu (if your port doesn't appear, restart the IDE with the board connected to the computer). Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (version 2.0 or greater, and the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). Be sure that you are resetting the board a couple of seconds before uploading. Also, on the serial boards, be sure that digital pins 0 and 1 are not connected to anything while uploading (they can connected and used after the code has been uploaded). If you get this error:

@@[VP 1] Device is not responding correctly.@@

trying uploading again (i.e. reset the board and press the download button a second time).
November 23, 2005, at 11:01 AM by 213.140.6.103 -
Changed lines 13-14 from:
If you're using a USB board, make sure that the jumper (little plastic piece near the USB plug) is on the correct pins. If you're powering the board with an external power supply (plugged into the power plug), the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the power plug. If you're powering the board through the USB, the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the USB plug.
to:
If you're using a USB board, make sure that the jumper (little plastic piece near the USB plug) is on the correct pins. If you're powering the board with an external power supply (plugged into the power plug), the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the power plug. If you're powering the board through the USB, the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the USB plug. (thanks to mrbbp)
Changed lines 19-20 from:
You probably have an old version of the communications library lying around. Search for comm.jar or jcl.jar in /System/Library/Frameworks/JavaVM.framework/ or in directories in your CLASSPATH or PATH environment variables.
to:
You probably have an old version of the communications library lying around. Search for comm.jar or jcl.jar in /System/Library/Frameworks/JavaVM.framework/ or in directories in your CLASSPATH or PATH environment variables. (reported by Anurag Sehgal)
November 22, 2005, at 04:55 PM by 213.140.6.103 -
Added lines 11-14:
'''What if my board doesn't turn on (the green power LED doesn't light up)?'''

If you're using a USB board, make sure that the jumper (little plastic piece near the USB plug) is on the correct pins. If you're powering the board with an external power supply (plugged into the power plug), the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the power plug. If you're powering the board through the USB, the jumper should be on the two pins closest to the USB plug.
Changed lines 23-24 from:
There are a few things that could be wrong. First make sure your board is on (the green LED is on) and connected to the computer. Then, check that the proper port is selected in the "Tools | Serial Port" menu (if your port doesn't appear, restart the IDE with the board connected to the computer). Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (version 2.0 or greater, and the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). Be sure that you are resetting the board a couple of seconds before uploading. Also, on the serial boards, be sure that digital pins 0 and 1 are not connected to anything while uploading (they can connected and used after the code has been uploaded).
to:
There are a few things that could be wrong. First make sure your board is on (the green LED is on) and connected to the computer (if it's not, see "what if my board doesn't turn on" above). Then, check that the proper port is selected in the "Tools | Serial Port" menu (if your port doesn't appear, restart the IDE with the board connected to the computer). Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (version 2.0 or greater, and the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). Be sure that you are resetting the board a couple of seconds before uploading. Also, on the serial boards, be sure that digital pins 0 and 1 are not connected to anything while uploading (they can connected and used after the code has been uploaded).
November 22, 2005, at 04:14 PM by 213.140.6.103 -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
''What do I do if I get the following error when launching Arduino?''
to:
'''What do I do if I get the following error when launching Arduino?'''
November 22, 2005, at 04:13 PM by 213.140.6.103 -
Added lines 11-16:
''What do I do if I get the following error when launching Arduino?''

@@Uncaught exception in main method: java.lang.UnsatisfiedLinkError: Native Library /Users/anu/Desktop/arduino-0002/librxtxSerial.jnilib already loaded in another classloader@@

You probably have an old version of the communications library lying around. Search for comm.jar or jcl.jar in /System/Library/Frameworks/JavaVM.framework/ or in directories in your CLASSPATH or PATH environment variables.
October 20, 2005, at 11:42 AM by 213.140.6.96 -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
See the [[Howto]] for options, which include [[Buy | buying]] a board or building your own from the information on the [[Hardware]] page.
to:
See the [[howto]] for options, which include [[Buy | buying]] a board or building your own from the information on the [[hardware]] page.
October 20, 2005, at 11:26 AM by 213.140.6.96 -
Added lines 7-8:
See the [[Howto]] for options, which include [[Buy | buying]] a board or building your own from the information on the [[Hardware]] page.
October 20, 2005, at 11:22 AM by 213.140.6.96 -
Added lines 3-6:
!!!General

'''How can I get an Arduino board?'''
October 20, 2005, at 11:21 AM by 213.140.6.96 -
Changed lines 9-17 from:
to:
'''Why am I getting garbage data from analogRead()?'''

Try flipping the pin without changing the code (e.g. if you call analogRead(0), use analog input pin 5 instead of 0).

Explanation: On the newer versions of the board, the order of the analog input pins was reversed but version 0002 of the software was not updated along with it. This should be fixed in version 0003.

'''Why don't I get a PWM (an analog output) when I call analogWrite() on pins other than 9 or 10?'''

The microcontroller on the Arduino board (the atmega8) only supports PWM/analogWrite() on certain pins. Calling analogWrite() on any other pins will give high (5 volts) for values greater than 128 and low (0 volts) for values less than 128.
October 20, 2005, at 11:12 AM by 213.140.6.96 -
Added lines 1-9:
!!Arduino Frequently Asked Questions

!!!Troubleshooting

'''Why I can't upload my programs to the Arduino board?'''

There are a few things that could be wrong. First make sure your board is on (the green LED is on) and connected to the computer. Then, check that the proper port is selected in the "Tools | Serial Port" menu (if your port doesn't appear, restart the IDE with the board connected to the computer). Then, make sure you have the right speed (baud rate) selected in the "Tools | Serial port speed" menu. It should be 9600 for older boards (those with no version numbers) and 19200 for newer boards (version 2.0 or greater, and the Arduino Extreme, which has two red LEDs marked "RX" and "TX"). Be sure that you are resetting the board a couple of seconds before uploading. Also, on the serial boards, be sure that digital pins 0 and 1 are not connected to anything while uploading (they can connected and used after the code has been uploaded).

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