Main.Howto History

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November 04, 2006, at 09:09 PM by David A. Mellis -
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This page is obsolete. You should instead see the Windows Howto or the Mac OS X howto (both in the Arduino guide?).

to:

This page is obsolete. You should instead see the Windows Howto or the Mac OS X howto (both in the Arduino guide).

November 04, 2006, at 09:09 PM by David A. Mellis -
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This page is obsolete. You should instead see the Windows Howto or the Mac OS X howto (both in the Arduino guide?).

to:

This page is obsolete. You should instead see the Windows Howto or the Mac OS X howto (both in the Arduino guide?).

November 04, 2006, at 09:08 PM by David A. Mellis -
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This page is obsolete. You should instead see the Windows Howto or the Mac OS X howto (both in the Arduino guide?).

October 22, 2006, at 12:23 PM by David A. Mellis -
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October 22, 2006, at 12:21 PM by David A. Mellis -
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The Arduino i/o board is a simple circuit featuring the Atmega8 processor from Atmel. The board is composed of a printed circuit board (PCB) and electronic parts. There are a few ways to get an Arduino board:

to:

The Arduino i/o board is a simple circuit featuring the ATmega8 processor from Atmel. The board is composed of a printed circuit board (PCB) and electronic parts.

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  • buy a ready made board. We have an agreement with a manufacturer who builds pre-made USB boards. See how you can buy a board or just the PCB.
to:

There are a few ways to get an Arduino board:

  • buy a ready made board. See how you can buy a board or just the PCB.
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If you uploaded the serial_write_basic example, you can check that it's working with the serial monitor. Make sure the Tools | Serial Monitor Baud Rate is set to 9600 and press the Serial Monitor button. You should see HIGH or LOW in the editor console, showing you the voltage on digital pin 0.

to:

A few seconds after the upload finishes, you should see the amber (yellow) LED on the board start to blink.

October 22, 2006, at 10:54 AM by David A. Mellis - adding pictures for resetting board and uploading sketch
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October 22, 2006, at 10:44 AM by David A. Mellis - putting pictures after (not before) relevant descriptions
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The Arduino i/o board is a simple circuit featuring the Atmega8 processor from Atmel. The board is composed of a printed circuit board (PCB) and electronic parts. There are a few ways to get an Arduino board:

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The Arduino i/o board is a simple circuit featuring the Atmega8 processor from Atmel. The board is composed of a printed circuit board (PCB) and electronic parts. There are a few ways to get an Arduino board:

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Mac OS X note: After downloading the IDE, run the macosx_setup.command. It corrects permission on a few files for use with the serial port and will prompt you for your password. You may need to reboot after running this script.

Deleted lines 35-36:

Mac OS X note: After downloading the IDE, run the macosx_setup.command. It corrects permission on a few files for use with the serial port and will prompt you for your password. You may need to reboot after running this script.

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On the Mac, mount the FTDIUSBSerialDriver_v2_1_6.dmg (on PPC machines) or the FTDIUSBSerialDriver_v2_2_6_Intel.dmg (on Intel machines) disk image and run the included FTDIUSBSerialDriver.pkg.

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On the Mac, mount the FTDIUSBSerialDriver_v2_1_6.dmg (on PPC machines) or the FTDIUSBSerialDriver_v2_2_6_Intel.dmg (on Intel machines) disk image and run the included FTDIUSBSerialDriver.pkg.

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Open the LED blink example sketch: File > Sketchbook > Examples > led_blink.

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Open the LED blink example sketch: File > Sketchbook > Examples > led_blink.

to:

Here's what the code for the LED blink example looks like.

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Select the serial device of the Arduino board from the Tools | Serial Port menu. On Windows, this should be COM1 or COM2 for a serial Arduino board, or COM3, COM4, or COM5 for a USB board. On the Mac, this should be something like /dev/cu.usbserial-1B1 for a USB board, or something like /dev/cu.USA19QW1b1P1.1 if using a Keyspan adapter with a serial board (other USB-to-serial adapters use different names).

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Select the serial device of the Arduino board from the Tools | Serial Port menu. On Windows, this should be COM1 or COM2 for a serial Arduino board, or COM3, COM4, or COM5 for a USB board. On the Mac, this should be something like /dev/cu.usbserial-1B1 for a USB board, or something like /dev/cu.USA19QW1b1P1.1 if using a Keyspan adapter with a serial board (other USB-to-serial adapters use different names).

October 22, 2006, at 10:37 AM by David A. Mellis - attaching plugged in board photo
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Open an Arduino sketch (the led_blink or serial_comm | serial_write_basic examples are good choices).

to:

Open the LED blink example sketch: File > Sketchbook > Examples > led_blink.

October 22, 2006, at 01:52 AM by David A. Mellis - updating mac ftdi driver filename
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On the Mac, mount the FTDIUSBSerialDriver_v2_0_1.dmg disk image and run the included FTDIUSBSerialDriver.pkg.

to:

On the Mac, mount the FTDIUSBSerialDriver_v2_1_6.dmg (on PPC machines) or the FTDIUSBSerialDriver_v2_2_6_Intel.dmg (on Intel machines) disk image and run the included FTDIUSBSerialDriver.pkg.

October 22, 2006, at 01:35 AM by David A. Mellis -
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October 22, 2006, at 01:28 AM by David A. Mellis -
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to:
  • European distributor
  • US distributor
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Linux note: For help getting the Arduino IDE running on Debian, please see the FAQ ("How can I run the Arduino IDE under Linux?").

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Linux note: For help getting the Arduino IDE running on Debian, please see the FAQ ("How can I run the Arduino IDE under Linux?").

October 22, 2006, at 01:17 AM by David A. Mellis -
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Howto

Arduino is still quite experimental (although already used in teaching). These are the steps you need to follow in order to be up and running.

To use Arduino you will need:

  1. the Arduino i/o board
  2. the Arduino environment
  3. to install the USB drivers
  4. to connect the board
  5. to upload a program
  6. to learn the Arduino programming language

Here is a step by step instruction list and explanation of everything that you need to rapidly get started with Arduino.

1 | the Arduino i/o board

to:

Arduino Howto

These are the steps you need to follow in order to be up and running:

  1. Get an Arduino board
  2. Download the Arduino environment
  3. Install the USB drivers
  4. Connect the board
  5. Upload a program

1 | Get an Arduino board

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2 | Arduino Environment

To program the Arduino board you just need the Arduino environment. The Arduino environment is a derivation of Processing therefore it should be very easy to use for those who are accustomed to programming Processing.

to:

2 | Download the Arduino environment

To program the Arduino board you need the Arduino environment.

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3 | USB Drivers

to:

For more information, see the guide to the Arduino environment.

3 | Install the USB drivers

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4 | Connect the Board

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4 | Connect the board

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5 | Upload a Program

to:

5 | Upload a program

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6 | Learn More

to:

Learn More

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  • Look up specific Arduino functions and syntax in the reference
to:
  • Look up specific Arduino functions and syntax in the reference
October 22, 2006, at 12:53 AM by David A. Mellis - attaching usb drivers mac screenshot
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  1. the USB drivers if you have a USB board
  2. the Arduino IDE
to:
  1. the Arduino environment
  2. to install the USB drivers
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2 | USB Drivers

to:

2 | Arduino Environment

To program the Arduino board you just need the Arduino environment. The Arduino environment is a derivation of Processing therefore it should be very easy to use for those who are accustomed to programming Processing.

Download Arduino: From the software page.

Mac OS X note: After downloading the IDE, run the macosx_setup.command. It corrects permission on a few files for use with the serial port and will prompt you for your password. You may need to reboot after running this script.

Linux note: For help getting the Arduino IDE running on Debian, please see the FAQ ("How can I run the Arduino IDE under Linux?").

3 | USB Drivers

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On Windows, you will need to unzip FTDI USB Drivers.zip. Then plug in the Arduino board and point the Windows Add Hardware wizard to the FTDI USB Drivers directory.

to:

On Windows, you will need to unzip FTDI USB Drivers.zip. Then, when you plug in the Arduino board, point the Windows Add Hardware wizard to the FTDI USB Drivers directory.

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3 | Arduino IDE

To program the ARDUINO board you just need the Arduino IDE (programming environment). The Arduino IDE is a derivation of Processing therefore it should be very easy to use for those who are accustomed to programming Processing.

Download Arduino: From the software page.

Mac OS X note: After downloading the IDE, run the macosx_setup.command. It corrects permission on a few files for use with the serial port and will prompt you for your password. You may need to reboot after running this script.

Linux note: For help getting the Arduino IDE running on Debian, please see the FAQ ("How can I run the Arduino IDE under Linux?").

Changed lines 49-50 from:

On the USB boards, the power source is selected by the jumper between the USB and power plugs. To power the board from the USB port (good for controlling low power devices like LEDs), place the jumper on the two pins closest to the USB plug. To power the board from an external power supply (needed for motors and other high current devices), place the jumper on the two pins closest to the power plug. Either way, connect the board to a USB port on your computer.

to:

On the USB boards, the power source is selected by the jumper between the USB and power plugs. To power the board from the USB port (good for controlling low power devices like LEDs), place the jumper on the two pins closest to the USB plug. To power the board from an external power supply (needed for motors and other high current devices), place the jumper on the two pins closest to the power plug. Either way, connect the board to a USB port on your computer. On Windows, the Add New Hardware wizard will open; tell it you want to specify the location to search for drivers and point to the folder containing the USB drivers you unzipped in the previous step.

October 22, 2006, at 12:26 AM by David A. Mellis - attaching serial port selection picture
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October 21, 2006, at 11:52 PM by David A. Mellis - adding led blink example picture
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October 09, 2006, at 12:49 AM by David A. Mellis -
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  • See the tutorials for some example programs. (There are also some examples available in the examples directory inside the arduino directory.)
to:
  • See the tutorials for some example programs. (There are also some examples available in the examples directory inside the arduino directory.)
August 27, 2006, at 11:48 AM by David A. Mellis -
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Linux note: For help getting the Arduino IDE running on Debian, please see this forum thread.

to:

Linux note: For help getting the Arduino IDE running on Debian, please see the FAQ ("How can I run the Arduino IDE under Linux?").

April 09, 2006, at 04:46 PM by David A. Mellis -
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  • Look up specific Arduino functions and syntax in reference
to:
  • Look up specific Arduino functions and syntax in the reference
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Help and Troubleshooting

April 09, 2006, at 04:45 PM by David A. Mellis -
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April 09, 2006, at 04:45 PM by David A. Mellis -
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After the setup you will have to learn the to program Arduino that allows you to control and fully take advantage of the ARDUINO[hw] board.

There are also some examples available in the examples directory inside the arduino directory.

More examples are available on the tutorials page

There is an API reference that documents the functions in the Arduino language.

The Arduino programming language is compatible with the Wiring language allowing porting applications from the Wiring board to Arduino. Please note the differences between the Wiring and Processing languages.

to:
  • Read about the Arduino Environment
  • Learn about the parts of the Arduino board?
  • See the tutorials for some example programs. (There are also some examples available in the examples directory inside the arduino directory.)
  • Look up specific Arduino functions and syntax in reference
  • The Arduino programming language is compatible with the Wiring language allowing porting applications from the Wiring board to Arduino. Please note the differences between the Wiring and Processing languages.
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If you're having problems, check the FAQ. If you don't find a solution there, try posting in the forums.

to:
  • If you're having problems, check the FAQ.
  • If you don't find a solution there, try posting in the forums.

March 15, 2006, at 10:30 AM by David A. Mellis - Corrected Linux forum thread link.
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Linux note: For help getting the Arduino IDE running on Debian, please see this forum thread.

to:

Linux note: For help getting the Arduino IDE running on Debian, please see this forum thread.

February 12, 2006, at 03:55 PM by 85.18.81.162 -
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The Arduino i/o board is a simple circuit featuring the Atmega8 processor from Atmel. The board is composed of a printed circuit board (PCB) and electronic parts that

to:

The Arduino i/o board is a simple circuit featuring the Atmega8 processor from Atmel. The board is composed of a printed circuit board (PCB) and electronic parts. There are a few ways to get an Arduino board:

February 05, 2006, at 10:55 AM by 82.186.237.10 -
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Open an Arduino sketch (the serial_comm | serial_write_basic example is a good choice).

to:

Open an Arduino sketch (the led_blink or serial_comm | serial_write_basic examples are good choices).

January 22, 2006, at 02:06 PM by 82.186.237.10 -
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Linux note: For help getting the Arduino IDE running on Debian, please see this forum thread.

January 20, 2006, at 05:46 PM by 85.18.81.162 -
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Mac OS X note: After downloading the IDE, run the macosx_setup.command. It corrects permission on a few files for use with the serial port and will prompt you for your password.

to:

Mac OS X note: After downloading the IDE, run the macosx_setup.command. It corrects permission on a few files for use with the serial port and will prompt you for your password. You may need to reboot after running this script.

January 20, 2006, at 05:33 PM by 85.18.81.162 -
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To use ARDUINO you will need:

to:

To use Arduino you will need:

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  1. the USB drivers if you have a USB board
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  1. the USB drivers if you have a USB board
  2. a bootloader if you are mounting the board from a blank PCB
  3. learning the programming language and develop projects.

Here is a step by step instruction list and explanation of everything that you need to rapidly get started with ARDUINO.

to:
  1. to connect the board
  2. to upload a program
  3. to learn the Arduino programming language

Here is a step by step instruction list and explanation of everything that you need to rapidly get started with Arduino.

Changed lines 24-32 from:

2 | Arduino IDE

To program the ARDUINO board you just need the Arduino IDE (programming environment). The Arduino IDE is a derivation of Processing therefore it should be very easy to use for those who are accustomed to programming Processing.

Download Arduino: From the software page.

Mac OS X note: After downloading the IDE, run the macosx_setup.command. It corrects permission on a few files for use with the serial port and will prompt you for your password.

3 | USB Drivers

to:

2 | USB Drivers

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4 | The Bootloader

The bootloader is a very tiny program (less that 1K) that resides in the memory of your board. This piece of code "listens" to the serial/USB port whenever you reset your board expecting to get new programs. We use this program because, otherwise, you would need to use an external piece of hardware called programmer in order to send new programs to your board. The programmers are quite expensive, and therefore we have made the board work with this trick.

If you purchased an already made board, or if you were part of one of the official Arduino workshops, you shouldn't worry, since your board already has the bootloader. If you build your own board, or if you are an expert user, you may be willing to learn how we made it. In that case, we have a longer description about the bootloader's functionality.

5 | Learn & Develop projects

to:

3 | Arduino IDE

To program the ARDUINO board you just need the Arduino IDE (programming environment). The Arduino IDE is a derivation of Processing therefore it should be very easy to use for those who are accustomed to programming Processing.

Download Arduino: From the software page.

Mac OS X note: After downloading the IDE, run the macosx_setup.command. It corrects permission on a few files for use with the serial port and will prompt you for your password.

4 | Connect the Board

If you're using a serial board, power the board with an external power supply (6 to 25 volts DC, with the core of the connector positive). Connect the board to a serial port on your computer.

On the USB boards, the power source is selected by the jumper between the USB and power plugs. To power the board from the USB port (good for controlling low power devices like LEDs), place the jumper on the two pins closest to the USB plug. To power the board from an external power supply (needed for motors and other high current devices), place the jumper on the two pins closest to the power plug. Either way, connect the board to a USB port on your computer.

The power LED should go on.

5 | Upload a Program

Open an Arduino sketch (the serial_comm | serial_write_basic example is a good choice).

Select the serial device of the Arduino board from the Tools | Serial Port menu. On Windows, this should be COM1 or COM2 for a serial Arduino board, or COM3, COM4, or COM5 for a USB board. On the Mac, this should be something like /dev/cu.usbserial-1B1 for a USB board, or something like /dev/cu.USA19QW1b1P1.1 if using a Keyspan adapter with a serial board (other USB-to-serial adapters use different names).

Push the reset button on the board then click the Upload button in the IDE. Wait a few seconds. If successful, the message "Done uploading." will appear in the status bar.

If the Arduino board doesn't show up in the Tools | Serial Port menu, or you get an error while uploading, please see the FAQ for troubleshooting suggestions.

If you uploaded the serial_write_basic example, you can check that it's working with the serial monitor. Make sure the Tools | Serial Monitor Baud Rate is set to 9600 and press the Serial Monitor button. You should see HIGH or LOW in the editor console, showing you the voltage on digital pin 0.

6 | Learn More

January 20, 2006, at 05:02 PM by 85.18.81.162 -
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To program the ARDUINO board you just need the Arduino programming environment. The Arduino programming envirominent is a derivation of Processing therefore it should be very easy to use for those who are accustomed to programming Processing.

Mac OS X note: After downloading the IDE, run the macosx_setup.command. It corrects permission on a few files for use with the serial port and will prompt you for your password.

to:

To program the ARDUINO board you just need the Arduino IDE (programming environment). The Arduino IDE is a derivation of Processing therefore it should be very easy to use for those who are accustomed to programming Processing.

Added lines 29-30:

Mac OS X note: After downloading the IDE, run the macosx_setup.command. It corrects permission on a few files for use with the serial port and will prompt you for your password.

January 20, 2006, at 05:00 PM by 85.18.81.162 -
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  • assemble the board. We put together a step by step guide on how to build an arduino board. Newbies: never soldered before? afraid of trashing thousands of boards before getting one properly soldered? fear not :) learn to master the art of soldering.
to:
  • assemble the board. We put together a step by step guide on how to build an arduino board. Newbies: never soldered before? afraid of trashing thousands of boards before getting one properly soldered? fear not :) learn to master the art of soldering.
January 20, 2006, at 05:00 PM by 85.18.81.162 -
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  • assemble the board. We put together a step by step guide on how to build an arduino board.
to:
  • assemble the board. We put together a step by step guide on how to build an arduino board. Newbies: never soldered before? afraid of trashing thousands of boards before getting one properly soldered? fear not :) learn to master the art of soldering.
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  • Newbies: never soldered before? afraid of trashing thousands of boards before getting one properly soldered? fear not :) learn to master the art of soldering.

2 | Programming Arduino

Arduino IDE

to:

2 | Arduino IDE

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The Arduino programming language is compatible with the Wiring language allowing porting applications from the Wiring board to Arduino. Please note the differences between the Wiring and Processing languages.

to:
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5.1 Programming Arduino

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There are also some examples available in the /examples directory inside the arduino directory.

to:

There are also some examples available in the examples directory inside the arduino directory.

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There is a preliminary APIReference.

to:

There is an API reference that documents the functions in the Arduino language.

The Arduino programming language is compatible with the Wiring language allowing porting applications from the Wiring board to Arduino. Please note the differences between the Wiring and Processing languages.

January 20, 2006, at 04:55 PM by 85.18.81.162 -
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to:

Mac OS X note: After downloading the IDE, run the macosx_setup.command. It corrects permission on a few files for use with the serial port and will prompt you for your password.

Changed lines 35-36 from:

If you got a USB board, you will need the drivers as available in the manufacturer to the board we are using. From Arduino-0003 the drivers will be included in the IDE's distribution, but if you are having an earlier version, visit FTDI-CHIP and get the drivers that better fit you. There are for many different operating systems, including MAC, Windows, and Linux.

to:

If you are using a USB Arduino, you will need to install the drivers for the FTDI chip on the board. These can be found in the drivers directory of the Arduino distribution.

On Windows, you will need to unzip FTDI USB Drivers.zip. Then plug in the Arduino board and point the Windows Add Hardware wizard to the FTDI USB Drivers directory.

On the Mac, mount the FTDIUSBSerialDriver_v2_0_1.dmg disk image and run the included FTDIUSBSerialDriver.pkg.

The latest version of the drivers can be found on the FTDI website.

January 16, 2006, at 02:33 PM by 85.18.81.162 -
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Download Arduino 0002: Mac OS X or Windows or read the release notes.

to:

Download Arduino: From the software page.

November 24, 2005, at 01:05 PM by 213.140.6.103 -
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to:

Help and Troubleshooting

If you're having problems, check the FAQ. If you don't find a solution there, try posting in the forums.

November 22, 2005, at 05:10 PM by 213.140.6.103 -
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  • purchase parts. purchase the parts from any electronics store. The Serial version in particular has been designed to use the most basic parts that can be found anywhere in the world. The USB version on the other hand requires some advanced soldering skills because of the FTDI chip that is an smd part. Here is a list of parts for the serial board.

  • assemble the board. We put together a step by step guide on how to build an arduino board.
  • program the bootloader. In order for the development environment to be able to program the chip, this has to be programmed with a piece of code called bootloader.

See the bootloader page on how to program it on your chip.

Newbies: never soldered before? afraid of trashing thousands of boards before getting one properly soldered? fear not :) learn to master the art of soldering.

to:
  • purchase parts. purchase the parts from any electronics store. The Serial version in particular has been designed to use the most basic parts that can be found anywhere in the world. The USB version on the other hand requires some advanced soldering skills because of the FTDI chip that is an smd part. Here is a list of parts for the serial board.
  • assemble the board. We put together a step by step guide on how to build an arduino board.
  • program the bootloader. In order for the development environment to be able to program the chip, this has to be programmed with a piece of code called bootloader. See the bootloader page on how to program it on your chip.
  • Newbies: never soldered before? afraid of trashing thousands of boards before getting one properly soldered? fear not :) learn to master the art of soldering.
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Previous IDE versions

These packages are not supported any longer by the development team:

  • Arduino 0001 for Mac OS X

  • Arduino 0001 for Windows (with Java | without Java)
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If you purchased an already made board, or if you were part of one of the official Arduino workshops, you shouldn't worry, since your board already has the bootloader. If you mount your standalone system, or if you are an expert user, you may be willing to learn how we made it. In that case, we have a longer description about the bootloader's functionality, just follow this link

to:

If you purchased an already made board, or if you were part of one of the official Arduino workshops, you shouldn't worry, since your board already has the bootloader. If you build your own board, or if you are an expert user, you may be willing to learn how we made it. In that case, we have a longer description about the bootloader's functionality.

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to:

There is a preliminary APIReference.

October 31, 2005, at 06:58 PM by 195.178.229.112 -
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We have a longer description about the bootloader's functionality, just follow this link

to:

If you purchased an already made board, or if you were part of one of the official Arduino workshops, you shouldn't worry, since your board already has the bootloader. If you mount your standalone system, or if you are an expert user, you may be willing to learn how we made it. In that case, we have a longer description about the bootloader's functionality, just follow this link

October 31, 2005, at 06:53 PM by 195.178.229.112 -
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3 | Learn & Develop projects

3.1 Programming Arduino

to:

3 | USB Drivers

If you got a USB board, you will need the drivers as available in the manufacturer to the board we are using. From Arduino-0003 the drivers will be included in the IDE's distribution, but if you are having an earlier version, visit FTDI-CHIP and get the drivers that better fit you. There are for many different operating systems, including MAC, Windows, and Linux.

4 | The Bootloader

The bootloader is a very tiny program (less that 1K) that resides in the memory of your board. This piece of code "listens" to the serial/USB port whenever you reset your board expecting to get new programs. We use this program because, otherwise, you would need to use an external piece of hardware called programmer in order to send new programs to your board. The programmers are quite expensive, and therefore we have made the board work with this trick.

We have a longer description about the bootloader's functionality, just follow this link

5 | Learn & Develop projects

5.1 Programming Arduino

October 31, 2005, at 06:46 PM by 195.178.229.112 -
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  1. the Wiring IDE + the Arduino/WiringLite library
  2. a bootloader
  3. learning the processing/wiring language and develop projects.
to:
  1. the Arduino IDE
  2. the USB drivers if you have a USB board
  3. a bootloader if you are mounting the board from a blank PCB
  4. learning the programming language and develop projects.
October 21, 2005, at 01:37 PM by 213.140.6.96 -
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Download Arduino 0002. Mac OS X or Windows or read the release notes.

to:

Download Arduino 0002: Mac OS X or Windows or read the release notes.

October 16, 2005, at 04:21 PM by 81.114.121.230 -
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  • buy a ready made board. We are talking to a number of manufacturer in order to provide pcb and ready made boards for a cheap price. in the meantime if you mail us we will be able to send you a bare pcb for cheap.
to:
  • buy a ready made board. We have an agreement with a manufacturer who builds pre-made USB boards. See how you can buy a board or just the PCB.
October 16, 2005, at 10:14 AM by 194.236.208.86 -
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Previous IDE versions
to:

Previous IDE versions

October 16, 2005, at 10:13 AM by 194.236.208.86 -
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Download Arduino for Mac OS X

Download Arduino for Windows (with Java | without Java).

to:

Download Arduino 0002. Mac OS X or Windows or read the release notes.

Previous IDE versions

These packages are not supported any longer by the development team:

  • Arduino 0001 for Mac OS X

  • Arduino 0001 for Windows (with Java | without Java)
September 22, 2005, at 10:06 AM by 195.178.229.112 -
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September 22, 2005, at 08:54 AM by 195.178.229.112 -
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download Arduino for PC (coming soon)

download Arduino for mac (coming soon)

to:

Download Arduino for Mac OS X

Download Arduino for Windows (with Java | without Java).

September 10, 2005, at 02:41 PM by 81.75.243.242 -
Changed lines 29-30 from:

The Arduino programming language is compatible with the Wiring language allowing porting applications from the Wiring board to Arduino.

to:

The Arduino programming language is compatible with the Wiring language allowing porting applications from the Wiring board to Arduino. Please note the differences between the Wiring and Processing languages.

August 28, 2005, at 03:31 PM by mbanzi -
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More examples are available on the tutorials page (coming soon)

to:

More examples are available on the tutorials page

August 28, 2005, at 03:30 PM by mbanzi -
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Arduino IDE

Wiring is a programming environment and electronics i/o board for exploring the electronic arts, tangible media, teaching and learning computer programming and prototyping with electronics. Initiated by Hernan Barragan at the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea. Wiring builds on Processing, by Ben Fry and Casey Reas.

to:

Arduino IDE

August 28, 2005, at 03:30 PM by mbanzi -
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2 | the Wiring IDE + ARDUINO library

Wiring

to:

2 | Programming Arduino

Arduino IDE

Changed lines 29-41 from:

To use it with ARDUINO you just need the Wiring programming environment since ARDUINO[hw] is in fact an upgraded and much cheaper version of the Wiring board. download Wiring for PC download Wiring for mac

ARDUINO[sw]/WiringLite library

ARDUINO[sw] is the software part of the ARDUINO "platform" needed to program the ARDUINO[hw] board ... it is a simplified library for the Wiring programming environment hence the "WiringLite" part of the name. once installed it adds to the Wiring programming environmente the capability to program the Atmega8... download ARDUINO[sw]/WiringLite (for Mac OS X, Windows XP, and Windows 2000) release notes and change log installation instructions

to:

To program the ARDUINO board you just need the Arduino programming environment. The Arduino programming envirominent is a derivation of Processing therefore it should be very easy to use for those who are accustomed to programming Processing. The Arduino programming language is compatible with the Wiring language allowing porting applications from the Wiring board to Arduino.

download Arduino for PC (coming soon)

download Arduino for mac (coming soon)

Changed lines 39-44 from:

3.1 the Wiring programming Language

After all the setup you will have to learn the Wiring programming language that allows you to control and fully take advantage of the ARDUINO[hw] board.

There are also some examples available in the <WIRING_Install_Dir>/examples directory

to:

3.1 Programming Arduino

After the setup you will have to learn the to program Arduino that allows you to control and fully take advantage of the ARDUINO[hw] board.

There are also some examples available in the /examples directory inside the arduino directory.

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to:
July 22, 2005, at 05:54 PM by mbanzi -
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1. the Arduino i/o board

to:

1 | the Arduino i/o board

Changed lines 18-19 from:
  • purchase parts.You can purchase the parts from any electronics store. The Serial version in particular has been designed to use the most basic parts that can be found anywhere in the world. The USB version on the other hand requires some advanced soldering skills because of the FTDI chip that is an smd part. Here is a list of parts for the serial board.
to:
  • purchase parts. purchase the parts from any electronics store. The Serial version in particular has been designed to use the most basic parts that can be found anywhere in the world. The USB version on the other hand requires some advanced soldering skills because of the FTDI chip that is an smd part. Here is a list of parts for the serial board.
Changed lines 21-22 from:
  • 'program the bootloader. In order for the development environment to be able to program the chip, this has to be programmed with a piece of code called bootloader.
to:
  • program the bootloader. In order for the development environment to be able to program the chip, this has to be programmed with a piece of code called bootloader.

See the bootloader page on how to program it on your chip. Newbies: never soldered before? afraid of trashing thousands of boards before getting one properly soldered? fear not :) learn to master the art of soldering.

2 | the Wiring IDE + ARDUINO library

Wiring

Wiring is a programming environment and electronics i/o board for exploring the electronic arts, tangible media, teaching and learning computer programming and prototyping with electronics. Initiated by Hernan Barragan at the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea. Wiring builds on Processing, by Ben Fry and Casey Reas.

To use it with ARDUINO you just need the Wiring programming environment since ARDUINO[hw] is in fact an upgraded and much cheaper version of the Wiring board. download Wiring for PC download Wiring for mac

ARDUINO[sw]/WiringLite library

ARDUINO[sw] is the software part of the ARDUINO "platform" needed to program the ARDUINO[hw] board ... it is a simplified library for the Wiring programming environment hence the "WiringLite" part of the name. once installed it adds to the Wiring programming environmente the capability to program the Atmega8... download ARDUINO[sw]/WiringLite (for Mac OS X, Windows XP, and Windows 2000) release notes and change log installation instructions

3 | Learn & Develop projects

3.1 the Wiring programming Language

After all the setup you will have to learn the Wiring programming language that allows you to control and fully take advantage of the ARDUINO[hw] board.

There are also some examples available in the <WIRING_Install_Dir>/examples directory

More examples are available on the tutorials page (coming soon)

July 22, 2005, at 05:23 PM by mbanzi -
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  • assemble the board

We put together a step by step guide on how to build an arduino board.

to:
  • assemble the board. We put together a step by step guide on how to build an arduino board.
  • 'program the bootloader. In order for the development environment to be able to program the chip, this has to be programmed with a piece of code called bootloader.
July 22, 2005, at 05:21 PM by mbanzi -
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  • buy a ready made board

We are talking to a number of manufacturer in order to provide pcb and ready made boards for a cheap price. in the meantime if you mail us we will be able to send you a bare pcb for cheap.

  • build your own board

If you want you can build your own PCB just by downloading the CAD files from the Hardware page. Extract the .brd file and send it to a PCB manufacturer. Be aware that manufacturing a single pcb will be very expensive. It's better to get together with other people and make 20 or 30 at a time. Since you get the full CAD files you can make your own customised version of Arduino. if you make modifications or fix bugs please send us your changes!

  • purchase parts

You can purchase the parts from any electronics store. The Serial version in particular has been designed to use the most basic parts that can be found anywhere in the world. The USB version on the other hand requires some advanced soldering skills because of the FTDI chip that is an smd part. Here is a list of parts for the serial board.

to:
  • buy a ready made board. We are talking to a number of manufacturer in order to provide pcb and ready made boards for a cheap price. in the meantime if you mail us we will be able to send you a bare pcb for cheap.
  • build your own board. If you want you can build your own PCB just by downloading the CAD files from the Hardware page. Extract the .brd file and send it to a PCB manufacturer. Be aware that manufacturing a single pcb will be very expensive. It's better to get together with other people and make 20 or 30 at a time. Since you get the full CAD files you can make your own customised version of Arduino. if you make modifications or fix bugs please send us your changes!
  • purchase parts.You can purchase the parts from any electronics store. The Serial version in particular has been designed to use the most basic parts that can be found anywhere in the world. The USB version on the other hand requires some advanced soldering skills because of the FTDI chip that is an smd part. Here is a list of parts for the serial board.
July 22, 2005, at 05:20 PM by mbanzi -
Changed line 16 from:

buy a ready made board

to:
  • buy a ready made board
Changed lines 18-25 from:

build your own board

If you want you can build your own PCB just by downloading the CAD files from the Hardware page. Extract the .brd file and send it to a PCB manufacturer. Be aware that manufacturing a single pcb will be very expensive. It's better to get together with other people and make 20 or 30 at a time. Since you get the full CAD files you can make your own customised version of Arduino. if you make modifications or fix bugs please send us your changes!

2.Assembly the board

3.

to:
  • build your own board

If you want you can build your own PCB just by downloading the CAD files from the Hardware page. Extract the .brd file and send it to a PCB manufacturer. Be aware that manufacturing a single pcb will be very expensive. It's better to get together with other people and make 20 or 30 at a time. Since you get the full CAD files you can make your own customised version of Arduino. if you make modifications or fix bugs please send us your changes!

  • purchase parts

You can purchase the parts from any electronics store. The Serial version in particular has been designed to use the most basic parts that can be found anywhere in the world. The USB version on the other hand requires some advanced soldering skills because of the FTDI chip that is an smd part. Here is a list of parts for the serial board.

  • assemble the board

We put together a step by step guide on how to build an arduino board.

July 22, 2005, at 05:11 PM by mbanzi -
Deleted lines 5-7:
  1. First of all join the community! we have a mailing list for users where the people who made arduino answer people's questions and can help you get throught the first steps.

Go to the forum page and register.

Changed lines 9-13 from:
  1. to learn the processing/wiring language and develop projects.

to:
  1. learning the processing/wiring language and develop projects.

Here is a step by step instruction list and explanation of everything that you need to rapidly get started with ARDUINO.

1. the Arduino i/o board

The Arduino i/o board is a simple circuit featuring the Atmega8 processor from Atmel. The board is composed of a printed circuit board (PCB) and electronic parts that

buy a ready made board

We are talking to a number of manufacturer in order to provide pcb and ready made boards for a cheap price. in the meantime if you mail us we will be able to send you a bare pcb for cheap.

build your own board

If you want you can build your own PCB just by downloading the CAD files from the Hardware page. Extract the .brd file and send it to a PCB manufacturer. Be aware that manufacturing a single pcb will be very expensive. It's better to get together with other people and make 20 or 30 at a time. Since you get the full CAD files you can make your own customised version of Arduino. if you make modifications or fix bugs please send us your changes!

2.Assembly the board

3.

July 22, 2005, at 04:42 PM by mbanzi -
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Arduino HOWTO

This page explains how to get started with the arduino board

First of all you have to understand that Arduino is quite experimental at the moment but at least it's free and opensource.

1. First of all join the community! we have a mailing list for users where the people who made arduino answer people's questions and can help you get throught the first steps. Go to https://lists.berlios.de/mailman/listinfo/arduino-beta then enter your email address. In the next two fields input a password that you can use to manage your subscription.

2. Get hold of a board. At the moment you can't buy a premade arduino board but you can build one freely. You can either get one made by a company or beg us to give you one of ours. If you are from an educational istitution we are happy to share a few boards with you, contact us at arduino@potemkin.org Take this zip file and extract the .brd file. Logon to a website like http://www.mdsrl.it or http://www.pcbpool.de and you can manifacture as many board as you like by uploading the .brd file.

3.

Compatibility Matrix

to:

Howto

Arduino is still quite experimental (although already used in teaching). These are the steps you need to follow in order to be up and running.

To use ARDUINO you will need:

  1. First of all join the community! we have a mailing list for users where the people who made arduino answer people's questions and can help you get throught the first steps.

Go to the forum page and register.

  1. the Arduino i/o board
  2. the Wiring IDE + the Arduino/WiringLite library
  3. a bootloader
  4. to learn the processing/wiring language and develop projects.

May 28, 2005, at 09:17 PM by 81.114.121.230 -
Changed lines 11-15 from:

Take this zip file and extract the .brd file. Logon to http://www.mdsrl.it or http://www.pcb

to:

Take this zip file and extract the .brd file. Logon to a website like http://www.mdsrl.it or http://www.pcbpool.de and you can manifacture as many board as you like by uploading the .brd file.

3.

May 26, 2005, at 12:44 PM by 81.114.121.230 -
Changed lines 5-7 from:

to:

First of all you have to understand that Arduino is quite experimental at the moment but at least it's free and opensource.

1. First of all join the community! we have a mailing list for users where the people who made arduino answer people's questions and can help you get throught the first steps. Go to https://lists.berlios.de/mailman/listinfo/arduino-beta then enter your email address. In the next two fields input a password that you can use to manage your subscription.

2. Get hold of a board. At the moment you can't buy a premade arduino board but you can build one freely. You can either get one made by a company or beg us to give you one of ours. If you are from an educational istitution we are happy to share a few boards with you, contact us at arduino@potemkin.org Take this zip file and extract the .brd file. Logon to http://www.mdsrl.it or http://www.pcb

May 26, 2005, at 12:34 PM by 81.114.121.230 -
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to:

This page explains how to get started with the arduino board

Compatibility Matrix

May 26, 2005, at 12:32 PM by 81.114.121.230 -
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May 26, 2005, at 12:32 PM by 81.114.121.230 -
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Being a collection of notes on the relative functioning or not of various combinations of hardware and software.

Windows 2000 (in the IDII lab)

  • Parallel port programmer: working.
  • AVR-ISP: working.
  • Serial cable w/ bootloader w/ uisp: not working.
  • Serial cable w/ bootloader w/ avrdude: working.
  • Keyspan w/ bootloader: working (but have to initiate export a few seconds before resetting board).

Windows XP (Erez's laptop)

  • Parallel port programmer: working.
  • Keyspan w/ AVR-ISP: not working.
  • Keyspan w/ bootloader: working.
  • Sitecom w/ bootloader: not working.

Mac OS X 10.3.9

  • Keyspan w/ AVR-ISP: working.
  • Keyspan w/ bootloader: working.
  • Sitecom w/ AVR-ISP: not working.

Note: Keyspan refers to the Keyspan USA-19QW USB-Serial adapter.

May 24, 2005, at 10:05 PM by 81.114.121.230 -
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  • Serial cable w/ bootloader: not working.
to:
  • Serial cable w/ bootloader w/ uisp: not working.
  • Serial cable w/ bootloader w/ avrdude: working.
May 21, 2005, at 05:40 PM by 81.114.121.230 -
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to:
  • Keyspan w/ bootloader: working (but have to initiate export a few seconds before resetting board).
May 21, 2005, at 05:26 PM by 81.114.121.230 -
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  • Sitecom w/ AVR-ISP: not working.
to:
  • Sitecom w/ AVR-ISP: not working.

Note: Keyspan refers to the Keyspan USA-19QW USB-Serial adapter.

May 21, 2005, at 05:15 PM by 81.114.121.230 -
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  • Keyspan w/ bootloader: working.
May 21, 2005, at 05:10 PM by 81.114.121.230 -
Added lines 1-21:

Arduino HOWTO

Being a collection of notes on the relative functioning or not of various combinations of hardware and software.

Windows 2000 (in the IDII lab)

  • Parallel port programmer: working.
  • AVR-ISP: working.
  • Serial cable w/ bootloader: not working.

Windows XP (Erez's laptop)

  • Parallel port programmer: working.
  • Keyspan w/ AVR-ISP: not working.
  • Keyspan w/ bootloader: working.
  • Sitecom w/ bootloader: not working.

Mac OS X 10.3.9

  • Keyspan w/ AVR-ISP: working.
  • Sitecom w/ AVR-ISP: not working.

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