Main.USBSerial History

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November 23, 2012, at 06:10 PM by Roberto Guido - added comments box on bottom
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October 03, 2011, at 02:59 PM by Federico -
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September 17, 2011, at 03:33 PM by Federico -
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Windows users need a .inf file for this specific product: Attach:Arduino_USBSerial.zip\\

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Windows users need a .inf file for this specific product: Arduino_USBSerial.zip\\

September 17, 2011, at 02:06 PM by Scott Fitzgerald - mirror dev
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September 12, 2011, at 03:07 AM by Scott Fitzgerald - updated to previous dev version
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USB Serial Adapter

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Rather than requiring a physical press of the reset button before an upload, the Arduino Uno is designed in a way that allows it to be reset by software running on a connected computer. One of the hardware flow control lines (DTR) of the ATmega8U2 is connected to the reset line of the ATmega328 via a 100 nanofarad capacitor. When this line is asserted (taken low), the reset line drops long enough to reset the chip. The Arduino software uses this capability to allow you to upload code by simply pressing the upload button in the Arduino environment. This means that the bootloader can have a shorter timeout, as the lowering of DTR can be well-coordinated with the start of the upload.

This setup has other implications. When the Uno is connected to either a computer running Mac OS X or Linux, it resets each time a connection is made to it from software (via USB). For the following half-second or so, the bootloader is running on the Uno. While it is programmed to ignore malformed data (i.e. anything besides an upload of new code), it will intercept the first few bytes of data sent to the board after a connection is opened. If a sketch running on the board receives one-time configuration or other data when it first starts, make sure that the software with which it communicates waits a second after opening the connection and before sending this data.

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The USB Serial connector is designed in a way that allows it to reset an attached board by software running on a connected computer.The external reset line mirrors the DTR line of the virtual serial device on the computer. It's typically connected to the reset line of the connected board (e.g. an Arduino Ethernet board) through a 100 nF capacitor, allowing the board to reset on upload.

This setup has other implications. When the board is connected to either a computer running Mac OS X or Linux, it resets each time a connection is made to it from software (via USB). While it is programmed to ignore malformed data (i.e. anything besides an upload of new code), it will intercept the first few bytes of data sent to the board after a connection is opened. If a sketch running on the board receives one-time configuration or other data when it first starts, make sure that the software with which it communicates waits a second after opening the connection and before sending this data.

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Photo of a USB Serial Adapter Front

Photo of a USB Serial Adapter Rear

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Windows users in order to get working the board need a .inf file for this specific product: Attach:Arduino_USBSerial.zip
For installation follow the same procedure on how install an UNO board on your computer.

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Windows users need a .inf file for this specific product: Attach:Arduino_USBSerial.zip
For installation follow the same procedure on how install an UNO board on your computer.

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July 13, 2011, at 03:07 PM by Federico -
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Windows users in order to get working the board need a .inf file for this specific product: Attach:Arduino_USBSerial.zip

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Drivers & Setup

Windows users in order to get working the board need a .inf file for this specific product: Attach:Arduino_USBSerial.zip\\

July 13, 2011, at 02:57 PM by Federico -
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Windows users in order to get working the board need a .inf file for this specific product: Attach:Arduino_USBSerial.inf Δ

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Windows users in order to get working the board need a .inf file for this specific product: Attach:Arduino_USBSerial.zip

July 13, 2011, at 02:55 PM by Federico -
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For installation follow the same procedure on how install an UNO board on your computer.

July 13, 2011, at 02:40 PM by Federico -
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Windows users in order to get working the board need a .inf file for this specific product: Attach:Arduino_USBSerial.inf Δ

July 13, 2011, at 12:35 PM by Federico -
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Attach:USBSerial_pinout.png Δ Pinout of a USB Serial Adapter

July 12, 2011, at 05:00 PM by Federico -
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Schematic & Reference Design

EAGLE files: USBSerial04_Light.zip

Schematic: USBSerial04_Light-sch.pdf

July 12, 2011, at 04:06 PM by Federico -
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USB Serial Adapter

This board converts a USB connection into 5 volt TX and RX that you can connect straight to the Arduino Mini or other microcontrollers, allowing them to talk to the computer. It features an Atmega8U2 programmed as a USB-to-serial converter, the same chip found on the Arduino Uno. The '8U2 firmware uses the standard USB COM drivers, and no external driver is needed. However, on Windows, a .inf file is required.

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USB Serial Adapter

This board converts a USB connection into a 5 volt Serial TX and RX that you can connect straight to the Arduino Mini, Arduino Ethernet or other microcontrollers, allowing them to talk to the computer. It features an Atmega8U2 programmed as a USB-to-serial converter, the same chip found on the Arduino Uno. The '8U2 firmware uses the standard USB COM drivers, and no external driver is needed. However, on Windows, a .inf file is required.

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The pinouts on the connector are compatible with a standard FTDI header ( as well as the Adafruit and Sparkfun USB-Serial adapters).

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Automatic (Software) Reset

Rather than requiring a physical press of the reset button before an upload, the Arduino Uno is designed in a way that allows it to be reset by software running on a connected computer. One of the hardware flow control lines (DTR) of the ATmega8U2 is connected to the reset line of the ATmega328 via a 100 nanofarad capacitor. When this line is asserted (taken low), the reset line drops long enough to reset the chip. The Arduino software uses this capability to allow you to upload code by simply pressing the upload button in the Arduino environment. This means that the bootloader can have a shorter timeout, as the lowering of DTR can be well-coordinated with the start of the upload.

This setup has other implications. When the Uno is connected to either a computer running Mac OS X or Linux, it resets each time a connection is made to it from software (via USB). For the following half-second or so, the bootloader is running on the Uno. While it is programmed to ignore malformed data (i.e. anything besides an upload of new code), it will intercept the first few bytes of data sent to the board after a connection is opened. If a sketch running on the board receives one-time configuration or other data when it first starts, make sure that the software with which it communicates waits a second after opening the connection and before sending this data.

The pinouts on the connector are compatible with a standard FTDI header ( as well as the Adafruit and Sparkfun USB-Serial adapters).

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Connecting to the Arduino Mini

See the guide to the Arduino Mini for information on connecting the adapter to the Mini.

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Connecting to the Arduino Mini

See the guide to the Arduino Mini for information on connecting the adapter to the Mini.


July 12, 2011, at 05:10 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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Status lights include power, RX and TX activity.

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Photo of a USB Serial Adapter

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Photo of a USB Serial Adapter Front

Photo of a USB Serial Adapter Rear

July 12, 2011, at 05:03 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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This board converts a USB connection into 5 volt TX and RX that you can connect straight to the Arduino Mini or other microcontrollers, allowing them to talk to the computer. It features the Atmega8U2 programmed as a USB-to-serial converter, the same chip found on the Arduino Uno.

to:

This board converts a USB connection into 5 volt TX and RX that you can connect straight to the Arduino Mini or other microcontrollers, allowing them to talk to the computer. It features an Atmega8U2 programmed as a USB-to-serial converter, the same chip found on the Arduino Uno. The '8U2 firmware uses the standard USB COM drivers, and no external driver is needed. However, on Windows, a .inf file is required.

The USB Serial Adapter has an onboard mini-USB connector and 5 pins including RX (for receiving data from the computer) and TX (for transmitting data). 5V, Ground and a Reset pin are also exposed.

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The USB Serial connector has an ISCP interface, allowing you to reprogram the chip when placed in DFU mode.

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The ATmega8U2 firmware source code is available . The ATmega8U2 is loaded with a DFU bootloader, which can be activated by connecting the solder jumper on the back of the board and then resetting the 8U2. You can then use Atmel's FLIP software (Windows) or the DFU programmer (Mac OS X and Linux) to load a new firmware. Or you can use the ISP header with an external programmer (overwriting the DFU bootloader). See this user-contributed tutorial for more information.

July 09, 2011, at 05:44 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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An onboard polyfuse limits the current to 500mA and protects the host computer from short circuits.

June 23, 2011, at 01:26 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The adapter can easily connect to the Arduino Ethernet, Mini, Mini Pro, LilyPad, LilyPad Simple, and Fio.

June 11, 2011, at 01:05 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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The pinouts on the connector are compatible with Adafruit and Sparkfun adapters.

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The pinouts on the connector are compatible with a standard FTDI header ( as well as the Adafruit and Sparkfun USB-Serial adapters).

June 11, 2011, at 01:02 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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This board converts a USB connection into 5 volt TX and RX that you can connect straight to the Arduino Mini or other microcontrollers, allowing them to talk to the computer. It is based on the FT232RL chip from FTDI (drivers are included with the Arduino software).

Photo of an original Mini USB Adapter

Pinout of the original Mini USB Adapter

Pinout of the revised Mini USB Adapter

Attach:mini_usb_schematic.pdf

to:

This board converts a USB connection into 5 volt TX and RX that you can connect straight to the Arduino Mini or other microcontrollers, allowing them to talk to the computer. It features the Atmega8U2 programmed as a USB-to-serial converter, the same chip found on the Arduino Uno.

The USB Serial connector has an ISCP interface, allowing you to reprogram the chip when placed in DFU mode.

The pinouts on the connector are compatible with Adafruit and Sparkfun adapters.

Photo of a USB Serial Adapter

Attach:USBSerial_pinout.png Δ

Pinout of a USB Serial Adapter

Attach:USBSerial_schematic.pdf Δ

June 11, 2011, at 12:06 AM by Scott Fitzgerald - Page Creation
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USB Serial Adapter

This board converts a USB connection into 5 volt TX and RX that you can connect straight to the Arduino Mini or other microcontrollers, allowing them to talk to the computer. It is based on the FT232RL chip from FTDI (drivers are included with the Arduino software).

Photo of an original Mini USB Adapter

Pinout of the original Mini USB Adapter

Pinout of the revised Mini USB Adapter

Attach:mini_usb_schematic.pdf

Connecting to the Arduino Mini

See the guide to the Arduino Mini for information on connecting the adapter to the Mini.

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