Reference.Assignment History

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April 13, 2014, at 10:32 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 10-11 from:
senVal = analogRead(0); @] // store the (digitized) input voltage at analog pin 0 in SensVal
to:
sensVal = analogRead(0); @] // store the (digitized) input voltage at analog pin 0 in SensVal
January 06, 2010, at 06:56 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 13-14 from:
The variable on the left side of the assignment operator ( = sign ) needs to be able to hold the value stored in it. If it is not large enough to hold value, the value stored in the variable will be incorrect.
to:
The variable on the left side of the assignment operator ( = sign ) needs to be able to hold the value stored in it. If it is not large enough to hold a value, the value stored in the variable will be incorrect.
September 15, 2008, at 02:30 AM by Paul Badger -
September 08, 2008, at 09:28 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 10-11 from:
senVal = analogRead(0); @] // store the (digitized) input voltage at analog pin 0 in SensVal
to:
senVal = analogRead(0); @] // store the (digitized) input voltage at analog pin 0 in SensVal
September 08, 2008, at 09:28 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 15-16 from:
Don't confuse the assignment operator [ = ] (single equal sign) with the comparison operator [ == ] (double equal signs) that evaluates whether two expressions are equal.
to:
Don't confuse the assignment operator [ = ] (single equal sign) with the comparison operator [ == ] (double equal signs), which evaluates whether two expressions are equal.
September 06, 2008, at 07:20 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed line 19 from:
*[[if| if (Comparison Operators)]]
to:
*[[if| if (comparison operators)]]
September 06, 2008, at 07:12 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 19-22 from:
[[if| if (Comparison Operators)]]
[[char]]
[[int]]
[[long]]
to:
*[[if| if (Comparison Operators)]]
*[[char]]
*[[int]]
*[[long]]
September 06, 2008, at 07:10 PM by Paul Badger -
Added lines 20-22:
[[char]]
[[int]]
[[long]]
September 06, 2008, at 06:49 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 10-11 from:
senVal = analogRead(0); @] // store the input voltage at analog pin 0 in SensVal
to:
senVal = analogRead(0); @] // store the (digitized) input voltage at analog pin 0 in SensVal
September 06, 2008, at 06:48 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 1-2 from:
!! = Assignment Operator (single equal sign)
to:
!! = assignment operator (single equal sign)
Changed line 9 from:
[@ int sensVal; // declare an integer variable named sensVal
to:
[@ int sensVal; // declare an integer variable named sensVal
September 06, 2008, at 02:37 AM by Paul Badger -
September 06, 2008, at 02:37 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed line 19 from:
[[if| 'if' Comparison Operators]]
to:
[[if| if (Comparison Operators)]]
September 06, 2008, at 02:36 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed line 19 from:
[[if]] Comparison Operators
to:
[[if| 'if' Comparison Operators]]
September 06, 2008, at 02:36 AM by Paul Badger -
Added lines 17-19:
!!!! See Also

[[if]] Comparison Operators
September 06, 2008, at 02:31 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 15-16 from:
Don't confuse the assignment operator ( = ) with the
to:
Don't confuse the assignment operator [ = ] (single equal sign) with the comparison operator [ == ] (double equal signs) that evaluates whether two expressions are equal.
September 06, 2008, at 02:28 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 1-6 from:
!! = (Assignment Operator)

Assign value to the right of the equal sign to the variable to the left of the equal sign.

The single equal sign in the C programming language is called the assignment operator. It has a different meaning than in algebra class where it indicated an equation or equality. The assignment operator tells the atmega chip to evaluate whatever value or expression is on the right side of the equal sign, and store it in the variable to the left of the equal sign.
to:
!! = Assignment Operator (single equal sign)

Stores the value to the right of the equal sign in the variable to the left of the equal sign.

The single equal sign in the C programming language is called the assignment operator. It has a different meaning than in algebra class where it indicated an equation or equality. The assignment operator tells the microcontroller to evaluate whatever value or expression is on the right side of the equal sign, and store it in the variable to the left of the equal sign.
Changed lines 9-11 from:
[@ int sensVal;
senVal = analogRead(0); @]
to:
[@ int sensVal; // declare an integer variable named sensVal
senVal = analogRead(0); @] // store the input voltage at analog pin 0 in SensVal
September 06, 2008, at 02:24 AM by Paul Badger -
September 06, 2008, at 02:21 AM by Paul Badger -
Added lines 1-16:
!! = (Assignment Operator)

Assign value to the right of the equal sign to the variable to the left of the equal sign.

The single equal sign in the C programming language is called the assignment operator. It has a different meaning than in algebra class where it indicated an equation or equality. The assignment operator tells the atmega chip to evaluate whatever value or expression is on the right side of the equal sign, and store it in the variable to the left of the equal sign.

!!!! Example

[@ int sensVal;
senVal = analogRead(0); @]

!!!! Programming Tips
The variable on the left side of the assignment operator ( = sign ) needs to be able to hold the value stored in it. If it is not large enough to hold value, the value stored in the variable will be incorrect.

Don't confuse the assignment operator ( = ) with the

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