Reference.Char History

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September 06, 2008, at 09:14 PM by Paul Badger -
September 06, 2008, at 09:13 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed line 13 from:
[@char myChar = 'A';
to:
[@ char myChar = 'A';
September 06, 2008, at 09:13 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed line 14 from:
char myChar = 65; // both are equivalent
to:
char myChar = 65; // both are equivalent
September 06, 2008, at 09:13 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 13-14 from:
[@char myChar = 'A';
[=char myChar = 65; // both are equivalent
to:
[@char myChar = 'A';
char myChar = 65; // both are equivalent
September 06, 2008, at 09:12 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 13-14 from:
[=char myChar = 'A';=]
to:
[@char myChar = 'A';
[=char myChar = 65; // both are equivalent
@]
September 08, 2007, at 04:22 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]]. It is also possible to do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65). See [[Serial/Println | Serial.println]] reference for more on how characters are translated to numbers.
to:
Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]]. This means that it is possible to do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65). See [[Serial/Println | Serial.println]] reference for more on how characters are translated to numbers.
July 20, 2007, at 01:11 AM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 9-10 from:
The char datatype is a signed type, meaning that it encodes numbers from -127 to 127. For an unsigned, one-byte (8 bit) data type, use the ''byte'' data type.
to:
The char datatype is a signed type, meaning that it encodes numbers from -128 to 127. For an unsigned, one-byte (8 bit) data type, use the ''byte'' data type.
July 19, 2007, at 03:12 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 9-10 from:
The char datatype is a signed type, meaning that it encodes numbers from -127 to 127. For an unsigned, one-byte (8 bit) data type, use the '''byte''' data type.
to:
The char datatype is a signed type, meaning that it encodes numbers from -127 to 127. For an unsigned, one-byte (8 bit) data type, use the ''byte'' data type.
July 19, 2007, at 03:12 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 9-10 from:
The char datatype is a signed type, meaning that it encodes numbers from -127 to 127. For an unsigned, one-byte (8 bit) data type, use the !!!byte data type.
to:
The char datatype is a signed type, meaning that it encodes numbers from -127 to 127. For an unsigned, one-byte (8 bit) data type, use the '''byte''' data type.
July 19, 2007, at 03:11 AM by Paul Badger -
July 19, 2007, at 03:09 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 9-10 from:
The char datatype is a signed type, meaning that it encodes numbers from -127 to 127.
to:
The char datatype is a signed type, meaning that it encodes numbers from -127 to 127. For an unsigned, one-byte (8 bit) data type, use the !!!byte data type.
July 19, 2007, at 03:05 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed line 20 from:
*[[Println]]
to:
*[[Serial/Println|Serial.println]]
July 19, 2007, at 03:04 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]]. It is also possible to do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65). See [[PrintLn | Serial.println]] reference for more on how characters are translated to numbers.
to:
Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]]. It is also possible to do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65). See [[Serial/Println | Serial.println]] reference for more on how characters are translated to numbers.
July 19, 2007, at 03:03 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]]. It is also possible to do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65). See [[Println | Serial.println]] reference for more on how characters are translated to numbers.
to:
Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]]. It is also possible to do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65). See [[PrintLn | Serial.println]] reference for more on how characters are translated to numbers.
July 19, 2007, at 03:03 AM by Paul Badger -
July 19, 2007, at 03:02 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]]. It is aslo possible to do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65). See the [[Serial.println example for more on how this works.
to:
Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]]. It is also possible to do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65). See [[Println | Serial.println]] reference for more on how characters are translated to numbers.

The char datatype is a signed type, meaning that it encodes numbers from -127 to 127.
Added line 20:
*[[Println]]
July 19, 2007, at 02:48 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 7-10 from:
Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]]. It is aslo possible to do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= myChar ='A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65).

See the Serial.prinln example for more on how this works.
to:
Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]]. It is aslo possible to do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65). See the [[Serial.println example for more on how this works.
July 19, 2007, at 02:47 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]] You can also do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65).
to:
Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]]. It is aslo possible to do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= myChar ='A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65).
July 19, 2007, at 02:44 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 5-6 from:
A data type that takes up 1 byte of memory that stores a character value. Character literals are written in single quotes, like this: [= 'A' =] (for multiple characters - strings - use double quotes: "ABC"). You can do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65).
to:
A data type that takes up 1 byte of memory that stores a character value. Character literals are written in single quotes, like this: [= 'A' =] (for multiple characters - strings - use double quotes: "ABC").

Characters are stored as numbers however. You can see the specific encoding in the [[ASCIIchart| ASCII chart]] You can also do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65).

See the Serial.prinln example for more on how this works.
May 29, 2007, at 05:21 AM by David A. Mellis -
Deleted lines 6-8:
Synonymous with type '''byte''' in Arduino.

May 29, 2007, at 03:06 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 7-9 from:
to:
Synonymous with type '''byte''' in Arduino.

Changed lines 12-26 from:
[=char sign = ' ';=]

!!!!Parameters

[=char var = 'x';=]

*var - your char variable name
*x - the value (single character) you assign to that variable... ie: a, 4, #, etc.






to:
[=char myChar = 'A';=]

!!!!See also

*[[byte]]
*[[int]]
*[[array]]
May 29, 2007, at 03:03 AM by Paul Badger -
Added line 7:
April 16, 2007, at 05:57 PM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 1-2 from:
!char
to:
!!char
Deleted lines 21-24:

[[HomePage | Reference Home]]

August 01, 2006, at 01:55 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 5-6 from:
A data type that takes up 1 byte of memory that stores a character value.
to:
A data type that takes up 1 byte of memory that stores a character value. Character literals are written in single quotes, like this: [= 'A' =] (for multiple characters - strings - use double quotes: "ABC"). You can do arithmetic on characters, in which the ASCII value of the character is used (e.g. [= 'A' + 1 =] has the value 66, since the ASCII value of the capital letter A is 65).
Changed lines 13-14 from:
[=char var = 'val';=]
to:
[=char var = 'x';=]
Changed lines 16-22 from:
*val - the value (single character) you assign to that variable... ie: a, 4, #, etc.





to:
*x - the value (single character) you assign to that variable... ie: a, 4, #, etc.





March 31, 2006, at 10:54 PM by Jeff Gray -
Changed lines 1-2 from:
!int
to:
!char
March 31, 2006, at 10:53 PM by Jeff Gray -
Changed lines 1-8 from:
to:
!int

!!!!Description

A data type that takes up 1 byte of memory that stores a character value.

!!!!Example
Changed lines 11-27 from:
A data type that takes up 1 byte of memory that stores a character value.
to:
!!!!Parameters

[=char var = 'val';=]

*var - your char variable name
*val - the value (single character) you assign to that variable... ie: a, 4, #, etc.






[[HomePage | Reference Home]]



February 14, 2006, at 04:54 PM by Erica Calogero -
Added lines 1-3:

[=char sign = ' ';=]
February 14, 2006, at 04:53 PM by Erica Calogero -
Added line 1:
A data type that takes up 1 byte of memory that stores a character value.

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