Reference.Double History

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December 23, 2013, at 11:49 AM by Cristian -Vacuum- Maglie - Fixed type
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Desciption

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Description

September 14, 2012, at 11:34 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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Double precision floating point number. Occupies 4 bytes.

The double implementation on the Arduino is currently exactly the same as the float, with no gain in precision.

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Double precision floating point number. On the Uno and other ATMEGA based boards, this occupies 4 bytes. That is, the double implementation is exactly the same as the float, with no gain in precision.

On the Arduino Due, doubles have 8-byte (64 bit) precision.

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Users who borrow code from other sources that includes double variables may wish to examine the code to see if the implied precision is different from that actually achieved on the Arduino.

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Users who borrow code from other sources that includes double variables may wish to examine the code to see if the implied precision is different from that actually achieved on ATMEGA based Arduinos.

January 27, 2009, at 07:00 AM by Paul Badger -
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Users who borrow code that includes double variables from other sources may wish to examine the code to see if the implied precision is different from that actually achieved on the Arduino.

to:

Users who borrow code from other sources that includes double variables may wish to examine the code to see if the implied precision is different from that actually achieved on the Arduino.

January 27, 2009, at 04:43 AM by Paul Badger -
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Double precision floating point number. Occupies 4 bytes. The maximum value a double can represent is 1.7976931348623157 x 10^308. (2^64 - 1)

to:

Double precision floating point number. Occupies 4 bytes.

The double implementation on the Arduino is currently exactly the same as the float, with no gain in precision.

Tip

Users who borrow code that includes double variables from other sources may wish to examine the code to see if the implied precision is different from that actually achieved on the Arduino.

November 02, 2008, at 11:19 AM by David A. Mellis -
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September 06, 2008, at 07:18 PM by Paul Badger -
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Double precision floating point number. Occupies 4 bytes.

to:

Double precision floating point number. Occupies 4 bytes. The maximum value a double can represent is 1.7976931348623157 x 10^308. (2^64 - 1)

April 09, 2008, at 04:01 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Double precision floating point number. Occupies 8 bytes. The maximum value a double can represent is 1.7976931348623157 x 10^308. Yes that's 10 to the 308th power. Just in case you get your Arduino project a spot as a space shuttle experiment.

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Double precision floating point number. Occupies 4 bytes.

April 28, 2007, at 05:22 AM by Paul Badger -
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Desciption

April 28, 2007, at 05:16 AM by Paul Badger -
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See:

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See:

April 28, 2007, at 05:15 AM by Paul Badger -
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double

Double precision floating point number. Occupies 8 bytes. The maximum value a double can represent is 1.7976931348623157 x 10^308. Yes that's 10 to the 308th power. Just in case you get your Arduino project a spot as a space shuttle experiment.

See:

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