Reference.Int History

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October 03, 2012, at 03:32 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 11-12 from:

int's store negative numbers with a technique called 2's complement math. The highest bit, sometimes referred to as the "sign" bit, flags the number as a negative number. The rest of the bits are inverted and 1 is added.

to:

int's store negative numbers with a technique called 2's complement math. The highest bit, sometimes referred to as the "sign" bit, flags the number as a negative number. The rest of the bits are inverted and 1 is added.

October 03, 2012, at 03:30 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 7-9 from:

On the Arduino Uno (and other ATMega based boards) an int stores a 16 bits (2 bytes) value. This yields a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of (2^15) - 1).
On the Arduino Due, an int stores a 32 bits (4 bytes) value. This yields a range of -2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647 (minimum value of -2^31 and a maximum value of (2^31) - 1).

to:

On the Arduino Uno (and other ATMega based boards) an int stores a 16-bit (2-byte) value. This yields a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of (2^15) - 1).
On the Arduino Due, an int stores a 32-bit (4-byte) value. This yields a range of -2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647 (minimum value of -2^31 and a maximum value of (2^31) - 1).

October 03, 2012, at 10:22 AM by Cristian -Vacuum- Maglie -
Changed line 30 from:

[@ int x

to:

[@ int x;

October 03, 2012, at 10:21 AM by Cristian -Vacuum- Maglie -
Changed lines 5-10 from:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage. On the Uno and other ATMEGA based boards, an int stores a 2 byte value. This yields a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of (2^15) - 1).

Ints on the Due store 32 bits (4 bytes) values, from -2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647 (minimum value of -2^31 and a maximum value of (2^31) - 1).

Int's store negative numbers with a technique called 2's complement math. The highest bit, sometimes refered to as the "sign" bit, flags the number as a negative number. The rest of the bits are inverted and 1 is added.

to:

Integers are your primary data-type for number storage.

On the Arduino Uno (and other ATMega based boards) an int stores a 16 bits (2 bytes) value. This yields a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of (2^15) - 1).
On the Arduino Due, an int stores a 32 bits (4 bytes) value. This yields a range of -2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647 (minimum value of -2^31 and a maximum value of (2^31) - 1).

int's store negative numbers with a technique called 2's complement math. The highest bit, sometimes referred to as the "sign" bit, flags the number as a negative number. The rest of the bits are inverted and 1 is added.

Changed lines 28-29 from:

When variables are made to exceed their maximum capacity they "roll over" back to their minimum capacitiy, note that this happens in both directions. Example for a 16-bit int:

to:

When variables are made to exceed their maximum capacity they "roll over" back to their minimum capacity, note that this happens in both directions. Example for a 16-bit int:

September 20, 2012, at 12:56 PM by Federico -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage. On the Uno and other ATMEGA based boards, an int stores a 2 byte value. This yields a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of (2^15) - 1). ints on the Due store 32 bits (4 bytes), from -2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647

to:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage. On the Uno and other ATMEGA based boards, an int stores a 2 byte value. This yields a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of (2^15) - 1).

Ints on the Due store 32 bits (4 bytes) values, from -2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647 (minimum value of -2^31 and a maximum value of (2^31) - 1).

Changed lines 27-28 from:

When variables are made to exceed their maximum capacity they "roll over" back to their minimum capacitiy, note that this happens in both directions.

to:

When variables are made to exceed their maximum capacity they "roll over" back to their minimum capacitiy, note that this happens in both directions. Example for a 16-bit int:

Changed line 30 from:
   x = -32,768;
to:
   x = -32768;
Changed line 33 from:
   x = 32,767;
to:
   x = 32767;
September 14, 2012, at 11:28 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage, and store a 2 byte value. This yields a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of (2^15) - 1).

to:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage. On the Uno and other ATMEGA based boards, an int stores a 2 byte value. This yields a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of (2^15) - 1). ints on the Due store 32 bits (4 bytes), from -2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647

Changed line 43 from:
  • Variable Declaration
to:
  • Variable Declaration
June 25, 2009, at 01:03 PM by Paul Badger -
Added line 43:
  • Variable Declaration
December 29, 2008, at 12:40 AM by Paul Badger -
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May 27, 2007, at 03:52 AM by Paul Badger -
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When variables are made to exceed their maximum capacity they "roll over" back to their minimum capacitiy, note that this happens in both directions

to:

When variables are made to exceed their maximum capacity they "roll over" back to their minimum capacitiy, note that this happens in both directions.

May 27, 2007, at 03:44 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 9-11 from:

The Arduino takes care of dealing with negative numbers for you, so that arithmetic operations work transparently in the expected manner. There can be an unexpected complication in dealing with the bitshift right operator (>>) however.

to:

The Arduino takes care of dealing with negative numbers for you, so that arithmetic operations work transparently in the expected manner. There can be an unexpected complication in dealing with the bitshift right operator (>>) however.

April 29, 2007, at 12:15 PM by David A. Mellis -
Deleted line 41:
April 25, 2007, at 01:02 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed line 42 from:
to:
April 25, 2007, at 01:01 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 7-11 from:

Int's store negative numbers with a technique called 2's complement math. The highest bit, sometimes refered to as the "sign" bit is flags the number as a negative number. The rest of the bits are inverted and 1 is added.

The Arduino takes care of dealing with negative numbers for you, so that arithmetic operations work trasparently in the expected manner. There can be an additional complication in dealing with the bitshift right operator (>>) however.

to:

Int's store negative numbers with a technique called 2's complement math. The highest bit, sometimes refered to as the "sign" bit, flags the number as a negative number. The rest of the bits are inverted and 1 is added.

The Arduino takes care of dealing with negative numbers for you, so that arithmetic operations work transparently in the expected manner. There can be an unexpected complication in dealing with the bitshift right operator (>>) however.

April 25, 2007, at 01:00 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 9-11 from:

The Arduino takes care of dealing with negative numbers for you so arithmetic operations work in the expected manner. There can be an additional complication in dealing with the bitshift right operator (>>) however.

to:

The Arduino takes care of dealing with negative numbers for you, so that arithmetic operations work trasparently in the expected manner. There can be an additional complication in dealing with the bitshift right operator (>>) however.

April 25, 2007, at 12:59 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage, and store a 2 byte value. This gives you a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of (2^15) - 1).

to:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage, and store a 2 byte value. This yields a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of (2^15) - 1).

Int's store negative numbers with a technique called 2's complement math. The highest bit, sometimes refered to as the "sign" bit is flags the number as a negative number. The rest of the bits are inverted and 1 is added.

The Arduino takes care of dealing with negative numbers for you so arithmetic operations work in the expected manner. There can be an additional complication in dealing with the bitshift right operator (>>) however.

Changed line 42 from:
to:
April 17, 2007, at 12:08 AM by David A. Mellis -
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[@ unsigned int x

to:

[@ int x

April 17, 2007, at 12:08 AM by David A. Mellis -
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Parameters

to:

Syntax

April 17, 2007, at 12:07 AM by David A. Mellis -
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to:
April 16, 2007, at 09:25 PM by Paul Badger -
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to:

Coding Tip

When variables are made to exceed their maximum capacity they "roll over" back to their minimum capacitiy, note that this happens in both directions

   unsigned int x
   x = -32,768;
   x = x - 1;       // x now contains 32,767 - rolls over in neg. direction

   x = 32,767;
   x = x + 1;       // x now contains -32,768 - rolls over

April 16, 2007, at 06:12 PM by Paul Badger -
Deleted lines 20-22:
April 16, 2007, at 08:08 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage, and store a 2 byte value. This gives you a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of 2^15 - 1).

to:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage, and store a 2 byte value. This gives you a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of (2^15) - 1).

April 16, 2006, at 10:27 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage, and store a 2 byte value. This gives you a range of -32,768 to 32,768 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of 2^15 - 1).

to:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage, and store a 2 byte value. This gives you a range of -32,768 to 32,767 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of 2^15 - 1).

April 16, 2006, at 10:27 PM by David A. Mellis - int is 2 bytes, not 4.
Changed lines 5-6 from:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage, and store a 4 byte value. This gives you a range of -2147483647 to 2147483647 (minimum value of - 2^31 and a maximum value of 2^31 - 1).

to:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage, and store a 2 byte value. This gives you a range of -32,768 to 32,768 (minimum value of -2^15 and a maximum value of 2^15 - 1).

March 24, 2006, at 08:55 PM by Jeff Gray -
Changed lines 5-6 from:

Integers are your primary form of number storage, and store a 4 byte value. This gives you a range of -2147483647 to 2147483647 (minimum value of - 2^31 and a maximum value of 2^31 - 1).

to:

Integers are your primary datatype for number storage, and store a 4 byte value. This gives you a range of -2147483647 to 2147483647 (minimum value of - 2^31 and a maximum value of 2^31 - 1).

March 24, 2006, at 08:55 PM by Jeff Gray -
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int var = val;

to:
    int var = val;
March 24, 2006, at 08:55 PM by Jeff Gray -
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[int var = val;]

to:

int var = val;

March 24, 2006, at 08:55 PM by Jeff Gray -
Changed lines 13-14 from:

int var = val;

to:

[int var = val;]

March 24, 2006, at 08:54 PM by Jeff Gray -
Added lines 1-8:

int

Description

Integers are your primary form of number storage, and store a 4 byte value. This gives you a range of -2147483647 to 2147483647 (minimum value of - 2^31 and a maximum value of 2^31 - 1).

Example

Changed lines 11-23 from:

A data type that is 4 bytes long with a minimum value of - 2^31 and a maximum value of 2^31 - 1. Needed before declaring a new variable in your code.

to:

Parameters

int var = val;

  • var - your int variable name
  • val - the value you assign to that variable

Reference Home

February 14, 2006, at 04:58 PM by Erica Calogero -
Added lines 1-3:
    int ledPin = 13;

A data type that is 4 bytes long with a minimum value of - 2^31 and a maximum value of 2^31 - 1. Needed before declaring a new variable in your code.

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