Reference.Min History

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February 06, 2010, at 09:26 AM by David A. Mellis -
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February 06, 2010, at 02:47 AM by Paul Badger -
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January 27, 2009, at 06:50 AM by Paul Badger -
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min(a++, 100); // avoid this - counts by two's

to:

min(a++, 100); // avoid this - yields incorrect results

January 27, 2009, at 06:49 AM by Paul Badger -
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@]

January 27, 2009, at 06:49 AM by Paul Badger -
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Warning

Because of the way the min() function is implemented, avoid using other functions inside the brackets, it may lead to incorrect results

[@ min(a++, 100); // avoid this - counts by two's

a++; min(a, 100); // use this instead - keep other math outside the function

November 04, 2007, at 05:32 AM by Paul Badger -
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                             // ensuring that it never gets above 100.

@]

to:
                             // ensuring that it never gets above 100.@]
November 04, 2007, at 05:32 AM by Paul Badger -
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November 04, 2007, at 05:32 AM by Paul Badger -
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[@sensVal = min(sensVal, 100); // assigns sensVal to the smaller of sensVal or 100, ensuring that it never gets above 100.

to:

[@sensVal = min(sensVal, 100); // assigns sensVal to the smaller of sensVal or 100

                             // ensuring that it never gets above 100.
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Note

Perhaps counter-intuitively, max() is often used to constrain the lower end of a variable's range, while min() is used to constrain the upper end of the range.

April 16, 2007, at 06:06 PM by Paul Badger -
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April 16, 2007, at 09:13 AM by David A. Mellis -
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[@sensVal = min(senVal, 100); // limits sensor's top reading to 100 maximum

to:

[@sensVal = min(sensVal, 100); // assigns sensVal to the smaller of sensVal or 100, ensuring that it never gets above 100.

Deleted lines 20-24:

Tip

min is useful for limiting the range a variable (say reading a sensor) can move. Even though the name min would seem to suggest it should be used to limit the sensor's minimum value, its real effect is to limit the variable's highest value. This can be slightly counterintuitive.

Programmers coming to C from the BASIC language may alsoexpect min to affect a variable without assigning the returned result to anything.

April 15, 2007, at 03:43 AM by Paul Badger -
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[@sensVal = min(senVal, 100); // limits sensor to 100 MAXIMUM

to:

[@sensVal = min(senVal, 100); // limits sensor's top reading to 100 maximum

Changed lines 21-25 from:

Common Programming Errors

Paradoxically, even though min would seem to limit the desired variable to a minimum value, it is really used to set the maximum value a variable can hold.

Programmers coming to C from the BASIC language may expect min to affect a variable without assigning the returned result to anything

to:

Tip

min is useful for limiting the range a variable (say reading a sensor) can move. Even though the name min would seem to suggest it should be used to limit the sensor's minimum value, its real effect is to limit the variable's highest value. This can be slightly counterintuitive.

Programmers coming to C from the BASIC language may alsoexpect min to affect a variable without assigning the returned result to anything.

April 14, 2007, at 07:55 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed lines 22-23 from:

Paradoxically, even though min would seem to limit the desired variable to a minimum value, it is really used to set the maximum value a variable can achieve.

to:

Paradoxically, even though min would seem to limit the desired variable to a minimum value, it is really used to set the maximum value a variable can hold.

April 14, 2007, at 07:54 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed line 18 from:

[@sensVal = min(senVal, 100); // limits sensor to 100 MAX

to:

[@sensVal = min(senVal, 100); // limits sensor to 100 MAXIMUM

April 14, 2007, at 06:13 AM by Paul Badger -
April 14, 2007, at 06:06 AM by Paul Badger -
April 14, 2007, at 06:05 AM by Paul Badger -
Changed line 18 from:

[@sensVal = min(senVal, 100); // limits sensor to 100 max

to:

[@sensVal = min(senVal, 100); // limits sensor to 100 MAX

April 14, 2007, at 06:04 AM by Paul Badger -
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x: the first number

y: the second number

to:

x: the first number, any data type

y: the second number, any data type

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Examples

sensVal = min(senVal, 100); // limits sensor to 100 max

Common Programming Errors

Paradoxically, even though min would seem to limit the desired variable to a minimum value, it is really used to set the maximum value a variable can achieve.

Programmers coming to C from the BASIC language may expect min to affect a variable without assigning the returned result to anything

December 02, 2006, at 06:59 PM by David A. Mellis -
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December 02, 2006, at 06:10 PM by David A. Mellis -
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min(x, y)

Description

Calculates the minimum of two numbers.

Parameters

x: the first number

y: the second number

Returns

The smaller of the two numbers.

See also

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