Tutorial.ConnectNoEncryption History

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March 10, 2013, at 05:22 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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WiFi UDP send and Receive String

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Connect No Encryption

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March 10, 2013, at 05:22 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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Connect No Encryption

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WiFi UDP send and Receive String

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July 31, 2012, at 10:58 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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April 25, 2012, at 06:20 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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April 21, 2012, at 12:06 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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This example shows you how to make a HTTP request using an Ethernet shield. It returns a Google search for the term "Arduino". The results of this search are viewable as HTML through your Arduino's serial window.

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This example shows you how to connect to an open (not encrypted) 802.11b/g network with the Arduino WiFi shield. Your Arduino's serial monitor will provide information about the connection once it has connected.

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The Ethernet shield allows you to connect a WizNet Ethernet controller to the Arduino via the SPI bus. It uses pins 10, 11, 12, and 13 for the SPI connection to the WizNet. Later models of the Ethernet shield also have an SD Card on board. Digital pin 4 is used to control the slave select pin on the SD card.

The shield should be connected to a network with an ethernet cable. You will need to change the network settings in the program to correspond to your network.

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The WiFi shield uses pins 10, 11, 12, and 13 for the SPI connection to the HDG104 module. Digital pin 4 is used to control the slave select pin on the SD card.

You should have access to a 802.11b/g wireless network that connects to the internet for this example. You will need to change the network settings in the sketch to correspond to your particular networks SSID.

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In the above image, the Arduino would be stacked below the Ethernet shield.

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In the above image, the Arduino would be stacked below the WiFi shield.

April 20, 2012, at 11:47 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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