Tutorial.EsploraKart History

Hide minor edits - Show changes to markup

December 24, 2012, at 03:24 AM by Tom Igoe -
Changed line 15 from:

Only your Arduino Espora is needed for this example.

to:

Only your Arduino Esplora is needed for this example. Connect the Esplora to your computer with a USB cable.

December 23, 2012, at 06:08 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed line 46 from:
to:
December 12, 2012, at 04:57 PM by Scott Fitzgerald - expanding the "code" section
Changed lines 24-25 from:

The default keystrokes you need to play with the SuperTuxKart games are:

to:

The default keys to play with the SuperTuxKart game are:

Changed line 37 from:

You need to map this keyboard keystrokes on the available inputs that you have on your Esplora board. To handle the eight different buttons, you'll use an arrays, ordered lists of variables with a fixed size. Each array has an index (counting from 0) to keep track of the position you're reading in the array, and each position can contain a number.

to:

You need to map these keyboard keystrokes to the available inputs on your Esplora board. To handle the eight different buttons, you'll use arrays, ordered lists of variables with a fixed size. Each array has an index (counting from 0) to keep track of the position you're reading in the array, and each position can contain a number.

Changed lines 41-43 from:

Once the state of the buttons have been read, the code looks up the associated key of each "on" input. This sends a virtual keypress to the computer. See the keyboard library reference for more information on using the Esplora as a keyboard or mouse.

to:

The Esplora has the ability to appear to a connected computer as a USB keyboard, so when you press the buttons and move the joystick, it's just like pressing keys on your keyboard.

The for() loop checks the state of all the buttons and the joystick. If the button's state has changed, then the corresponding keypress or release is sent to the computer. See the keyboard library reference for more information on using the Esplora as a keyboard or mouse.

December 10, 2012, at 02:56 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Changed lines 5-9 from:

This eample explains you how to turn your Esplora into a customized computer game pad. It uses the analog joystick and the four switches. The Esplora will act as a standard keyboard and the computer will be controlled by moving the joystick in a direction or by pressing a push-button.

The configuration choosen in this example is suitable for SuperTuxKart, an open-source racing game, available for all the platforms. It can be downloaded from http://supertuxkart.sourceforge.net/ .

to:

This example demonstrates how to turn your Esplora into a customized computer game pad. It uses the analog joystick and the four switches as inputs to a video game. The Esplora will appear to the computer as a standard keyboard, the computer will see joystick movement and button presses as keystrokes.

The configuration choosen in this example is suitable for SuperTuxKart, an open-source racing game, available for Windows, OSX, and Linux. It can be downloaded from http://supertuxkart.sourceforge.net/ .

Changed lines 37-38 from:

You need to map this keyboard keystrokes on the available inputs that you have on your Esplora board. Because you need to handle eight different buttons, you'll use arrays, which are ordered lists of variables with a fixed size. Each array has an index (counting from 0) to keep track of the position you're reading in the array, and each position can contain a number.

to:

You need to map this keyboard keystrokes on the available inputs that you have on your Esplora board. To handle the eight different buttons, you'll use an arrays, ordered lists of variables with a fixed size. Each array has an index (counting from 0) to keep track of the position you're reading in the array, and each position can contain a number.

Changed lines 39-43 from:

This code uses three different arrays: one for the buttons you'll read, a second to hold the current states of those buttons and a third to hold the keystrokes associated with each button.

Once that the buttons have been read, the code know if you need to virtually press or not the correspondent key of the keyboard. The Esplora can be recognized and act as a standard English keyboard, and you can use it in that way with the keyboard class.

to:

This code uses three different arrays: one for the buttons you'll read, a second to hold the current state of the buttons, and a third to hold the keystrokes associated with each button.

Once the state of the buttons have been read, the code looks up the associated key of each "on" input. This sends a virtual keypress to the computer. See the keyboard library reference for more information on using the Esplora as a keyboard or mouse.

December 10, 2012, at 11:45 AM by Federico -
Changed lines 48-49 from:
to:
Changed line 57 from:
to:
December 08, 2012, at 08:20 PM by Federico -
Changed line 17 from:
to:
December 08, 2012, at 08:18 PM by Federico -
Changed line 17 from:
to:
December 05, 2012, at 07:39 PM by Federico -
Changed line 17 from:
to:
December 05, 2012, at 03:34 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
Added line 49:
December 03, 2012, at 08:21 PM by Federico -
Changed line 55 from:
to:
December 03, 2012, at 08:20 PM by Federico -
Added lines 1-57:

Share