Tutorial.StringComparisonOperators History

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November 06, 2014, at 10:35 AM by Arturo -
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The String comparison operators, ==, !=,>, < ,>=, <= , and the functionsequals() and equalsIgoreCase() allow you to make alphabetic comparisons between Strings. They're useful for sorting and alphabetizing, among other things.

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The String comparison operators, ==, !=,>, < ,>=, <= , and the functions equals() and equalsIgnoreCase() allow you to make alphabetic comparisons between Strings. They're useful for sorting and alphabetizing, among other things.

May 02, 2012, at 03:56 PM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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November 16, 2011, at 04:25 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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September 19, 2010, at 11:34 PM by Christian Cerrito -
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String Comparison Operatprs

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String Comparison Operators

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There is no circuit for this example.

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There is no circuit for this example, though your Arduino must be connected to your computer via USB.

image developed using Fritzing. For more circuit examples, see the Fritzing project page

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September 16, 2010, at 10:44 PM by Tom Igoe -
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September 16, 2010, at 10:44 PM by Tom Igoe -
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if (stringOne.equals(stringTwo)) {

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if (stringOne ==stringTwo) {

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August 01, 2010, at 06:17 PM by Tom Igoe -
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The greater than and less than operators evaluate strings in alphabetical order, on the first character where the two differ. So, for example "a" < "b" and "1" < "2", but @@"999"> "1000" because 9 comes after 1.

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The greater than and less than operators evaluate strings in alphabetical order, on the first character where the two differ. So, for example "a" < "b" and "1" < "2", but "999"> "1000" because 9 comes after 1.

August 01, 2010, at 06:17 PM by Tom Igoe -
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The operator == and the function @@equals() perform identically. It's just a matter of which you prefer. So

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The operator == and the function equals() perform identically. It's just a matter of which you prefer. So

August 01, 2010, at 06:16 PM by Tom Igoe -
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