Main.ArduinoXbeeShield History

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February 27, 2012, at 06:13 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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NB : This information is for reference purposes only and refers to a deprecated product. Information on the current Wireless Shield can be found here

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NB : This page refers to a deprecated product. Information on the current Wireless Shield can be found here

February 27, 2012, at 06:12 AM by Scott Fitzgerald -
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NB : This information is for reference purposes only and refers to a deprecated product. Information on the current Wireless Shield can be found here

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December 06, 2010, at 06:03 PM by Davide Gomba -
August 30, 2010, at 02:04 PM by David A. Mellis -
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The Arduino XBee shield can be used with different XBee modules. The instructions below are for the XBee 802.15.4 modules.

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The Arduino XBee shield can be used with different XBee modules. The instructions below are for the XBee 802.15.4 modules (sometimes called "Series 1" to distinguish them from the Series 2 modules, although "Series 1" doesn't appear in the official name or product description).

August 15, 2009, at 01:55 PM by David A. Mellis -
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The Arduino XBee shield can be used with different XBee modules. The instructions below are for the XBee 802.15.4 modules.

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The Arduino XBee shield can be used with different XBee modules. The instructions below are for the XBee 802.15.4 modules.

August 15, 2009, at 01:54 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Addressing

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Networking

The Arduino XBee shield can be used with different XBee modules. The instructions below are for the XBee 802.15.4 modules.

Addressing

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Configuration

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Configuration

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For more details on configuring the Xbee module, see the product manual from MaxStream.

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For more details on configuring the Xbee module, see the product manual from MaxStream.

August 16, 2007, at 12:45 AM by David A. Mellis -
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Schematic

XbeeShieldSchematic.pdf (Eagle schematics and board layouts available from the Libelium SquidBee wiki download page.)

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Schematic

XbeeShieldSchematic.pdf (Eagle schematics and board layouts available from the Libelium SquidBee wiki download page.)

August 16, 2007, at 12:44 AM by David A. Mellis -
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The Xbee shield was created in collaboration with Libelium, who developed it for use in their SquidBee motes (used for creating sensor networks).

August 16, 2007, at 12:35 AM by David A. Mellis -
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XbeeShieldSchematic.pdf

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XbeeShieldSchematic.pdf (Eagle schematics and board layouts available from the Libelium SquidBee wiki download page.)

August 16, 2007, at 12:27 AM by David A. Mellis -
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August 16, 2007, at 12:17 AM by David A. Mellis -
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XbeeShieldSchematic.pdf

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XbeeShieldSchematic.jpg

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August 16, 2007, at 12:14 AM by David A. Mellis -
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Note: although the valid and default values in the table above are written with a prefix of "0x" (to indicate that they are hexadecimal numbers), the module will not include the "0x" when reporting the value of a parameter, and you should omit it when setting values.

August 16, 2007, at 12:12 AM by David A. Mellis -
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August 16, 2007, at 12:11 AM by David A. Mellis -
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There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter (see "Configuration" below for more details on the parameters). They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules on its network and channel will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a few ways:

to:

There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter (see "Configuration" below for more details on the parameters). The modules need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules on its network and channel will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a few ways:

August 16, 2007, at 12:10 AM by David A. Mellis -
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There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter. They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules on its network and channel will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a few ways:

to:

There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter (see "Configuration" below for more details on the parameters). They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules on its network and channel will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a few ways:

August 16, 2007, at 12:05 AM by David A. Mellis -
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August 15, 2007, at 11:58 PM by David A. Mellis -
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The Xbee shield allows an Arduino board to communicate wirelessly using Zigbee. It is based on the Xbee module from MaxStream. The module can communicate up to 100 feet indoors or 300 feet outdoors (with line-of-sight). It can be used as a serial/usb replacement or you can put it into a command mode and configure it for a variety of broadcast and mesh networking options. The shield also provides female pin headers for easy use of digital pins 2 to 7 and the analog inputs (digital pins 8 to 13 are not covered by the shield).

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The Xbee shield allows an Arduino board to communicate wirelessly using Zigbee. It is based on the Xbee module from MaxStream. The module can communicate up to 100 feet indoors or 300 feet outdoors (with line-of-sight). It can be used as a serial/usb replacement or you can put it into a command mode and configure it for a variety of broadcast and mesh networking options. The shields breaks out each of the Xbee's pins to a through-hole solder pad. It also provides female pin headers for use of digital pins 2 to 7 and the analog inputs, which are covered by the shield (digital pins 8 to 13 are not obstructed by the shield, so you can use the headers on the board itself).

August 15, 2007, at 11:56 PM by David A. Mellis -
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The Xbee shield allows an Arduino board to communicate wirelessly using Zigbee. It is based on the Xbee module from MaxStream. The module can communicate up to 100 feet indoors or 300 feet outdoors (with line-of-sight). It can be used as a serial/usb replacement or you can put it into a command mode and configure it for a variety of broadcast and mesh networking options.

to:

The Xbee shield allows an Arduino board to communicate wirelessly using Zigbee. It is based on the Xbee module from MaxStream. The module can communicate up to 100 feet indoors or 300 feet outdoors (with line-of-sight). It can be used as a serial/usb replacement or you can put it into a command mode and configure it for a variety of broadcast and mesh networking options. The shield also provides female pin headers for easy use of digital pins 2 to 7 and the analog inputs (digital pins 8 to 13 are not covered by the shield).

August 15, 2007, at 11:55 PM by David A. Mellis -
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There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter. They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a few ways:

to:

There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter. They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules on its network and channel will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a few ways:

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  • If DH is 0 and DL equals 0xFFFF, the module's transmissions will be received by all modules on the same network and channel.
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  • If DH is 0 and DL equals 0xFFFF, the module's transmissions will be received by all modules.
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Again, this address matching will only happen between modules on the same network and channel. If two modules are on different networks or channels, they can't communicate regardless of their addresses.

August 15, 2007, at 11:42 PM by David A. Mellis -
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There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter. They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a couple of ways. If a module's DH is 0 and its DL is less than 0xFFFF (i.e. 16 bits), data transmitted by that module will be received by any module whose 16-bit address MY parameter equals DL. If DH is 0 and DL equals 0xFFFF, the module's transmissions will be received by all modules on the same network and channel. If DH is non-zero or DL is greater than 0xFFFF, the transmission will only be received by the module whose serial number equals the transmitting module's destination address (i.e. whose SH equals the transmitting module's DH and whose SL equals its DL).

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There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter. They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a few ways:

  • If a module's DH is 0 and its DL is less than 0xFFFF (i.e. 16 bits), data transmitted by that module will be received by any module whose 16-bit address MY parameter equals DL.
  • If DH is 0 and DL equals 0xFFFF, the module's transmissions will be received by all modules on the same network and channel.
  • If DH is non-zero or DL is greater than 0xFFFF, the transmission will only be received by the module whose serial number equals the transmitting module's destination address (i.e. whose SH equals the transmitting module's DH and whose SL equals its DL).
August 15, 2007, at 11:41 PM by David A. Mellis -
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There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter. They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a couple of ways. If a module's DH is 0 and its DL is less than 0xFFFF (i.e. 16 bits), data transmitted by that module will be received by any module whose 16-bit address MY parameter equals DL. If DH is 0 and DL equals 0xFFFF, the module's transmissions will be received by all modules on the same network and channel. If DH is non-zero or DL is greater than 0xFFFF, the transmission will only be received by the module whose serial number equals the transmitting module's destination address (i.e. whose SH equals the transmitting module's DH and whose SL"' equals its DL''').

to:

There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter. They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a couple of ways. If a module's DH is 0 and its DL is less than 0xFFFF (i.e. 16 bits), data transmitted by that module will be received by any module whose 16-bit address MY parameter equals DL. If DH is 0 and DL equals 0xFFFF, the module's transmissions will be received by all modules on the same network and channel. If DH is non-zero or DL is greater than 0xFFFF, the transmission will only be received by the module whose serial number equals the transmitting module's destination address (i.e. whose SH equals the transmitting module's DH and whose SL equals its DL).

August 15, 2007, at 11:41 PM by David A. Mellis -
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There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter. They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a couple of ways. If a module's DH is 0 and its DL is less than 0xFFFF (i.e. 16 bits), data transmitted by that module will be received by any module whose 16-bit address MY parameter equals DL. If DH is 0 and DL equals 0xFFFF, the module's transmissions will be received by all modules on the same network and channel. If DH is non-zero or DL is greater than 0xFFFF, the transmission will only be received by the module whose serial number equals the transmitting module's destination address (i.e. whose SH equals the transmitting module's DH and whose SL" equals its DL').

to:

There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter. They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a couple of ways. If a module's DH is 0 and its DL is less than 0xFFFF (i.e. 16 bits), data transmitted by that module will be received by any module whose 16-bit address MY parameter equals DL. If DH is 0 and DL equals 0xFFFF, the module's transmissions will be received by all modules on the same network and channel. If DH is non-zero or DL is greater than 0xFFFF, the transmission will only be received by the module whose serial number equals the transmitting module's destination address (i.e. whose SH equals the transmitting module's DH and whose SL"' equals its DL''').

August 15, 2007, at 11:39 PM by David A. Mellis -
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There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter. They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules will receive the data it transmits.

to:

There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter. They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules will receive the data it transmits. This can happen in a couple of ways. If a module's DH is 0 and its DL is less than 0xFFFF (i.e. 16 bits), data transmitted by that module will be received by any module whose 16-bit address MY parameter equals DL. If DH is 0 and DL equals 0xFFFF, the module's transmissions will be received by all modules on the same network and channel. If DH is non-zero or DL is greater than 0xFFFF, the transmission will only be received by the module whose serial number equals the transmitting module's destination address (i.e. whose SH equals the transmitting module's DH and whose SL" equals its DL').

August 15, 2007, at 11:32 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Addressing

There are multiple parameters that need to be configured correctly for two modules to talk to each other (although with the default settings, all modules should be able to talk to each other). They need to be on the same network, as set by the ID parameter. They need to be on the same channel, as set by the CH parameter. Finally, a module's destination address (DH and DL parameters) determine which modules will receive the data it transmits.

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Here are some of the more useful commands for configuring your Xbee module. For step-by-step instructions on using these commands, see the guide to the Xbee shield. When you use these commands, prepend AT to them (e.g. to use the ID command, you should type ATID).

to:

Here are some of the more useful parameters for configuring your Xbee module. For step-by-step instructions on reading and writing them, see the guide to the Xbee shield. Make sure to prepend AT to the parameter name when sending a command to the module (e.g. to read the ID parameter, you should send the command ATID).

August 15, 2007, at 11:14 PM by David A. Mellis -
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CommandDescriptionValid ValuesDefault Value
IDThe network ID of the Xbee module. In most cases, a module will communicate with other modules that share the same network ID.0 - FFFF3332
BDThe baud rate used for serial communication with the Arduino board or computer.0 = 1200 bps
1 = 2400
2 = 4800
3 = 9600
4 = 19200
5 = 38400
6 = 57600
7 = 115200
3 (9600 baud)
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August 15, 2007, at 09:40 PM by David A. Mellis -
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BDThe baud rate used for serial communication with the Arduino board or computer.0 = 1200 bps
1 = 2400
2 = 4800 \\ 3 = 9600 \\ 4 = 19200 \\ 5 = 38400 \\ 6 = 57600 \\ 7 = 115200
3 (9600 baud)
to:
BDThe baud rate used for serial communication with the Arduino board or computer.0 = 1200 bps
1 = 2400
2 = 4800
3 = 9600
4 = 19200
5 = 38400
6 = 57600
7 = 115200
3 (9600 baud)
August 15, 2007, at 09:40 PM by David A. Mellis -
August 15, 2007, at 09:40 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Here are some of the more useful commands for configuring your Xbee module. For step-by-step instructions on using these commands, see the guide to the Xbee shield. When you use these commands, prepend AT to them (e.g. to
use the ID command, you should type ATID).

to:

Here are some of the more useful commands for configuring your Xbee module. For step-by-step instructions on using these commands, see the guide to the Xbee shield. When you use these commands, prepend AT to them (e.g. to use the ID command, you should type ATID).

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BDThe baud rate used for serial communication with the Arduino board or computer.0 = 1200 bps >>? 1 = 2400 \\ 2 = 4800 \\ 3 = 9600 \\ 4 = 19200 \\ 5 = 38400 \\ 6 = 57600 \\ 7 = 1152003 (9600 baud)
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BDThe baud rate used for serial communication with the Arduino board or computer.0 = 1200 bps
1 = 2400
2 = 4800 \\ 3 = 9600 \\ 4 = 19200 \\ 5 = 38400 \\ 6 = 57600 \\ 7 = 115200
3 (9600 baud)
August 15, 2007, at 09:39 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Here are some of the more useful commands for configuring your Xbee module. For step-by-step instructions on using these commands, see the guide to the Xbee shield. When you use these commands, prepend AT to them (e.g. to use the ID command, you should type ATID).

to:

Here are some of the more useful commands for configuring your Xbee module. For step-by-step instructions on using these commands, see the guide to the Xbee shield. When you use these commands, prepend AT to them (e.g. to
use the ID command, you should type ATID).

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BDThe baud rate used for serial communication with the Arduino board or computer.0 = 1200 bps \\ 1 = 2400 \\ 2 = 4800 \\ 3 = 9600 \\ 4 = 19200 \\ 5 = 38400 \\ 6 = 57600 \\ 7 = 1152003 (9600 baud)
to:
BDThe baud rate used for serial communication with the Arduino board or computer.0 = 1200 bps >>? 1 = 2400 \\ 2 = 4800 \\ 3 = 9600 \\ 4 = 19200 \\ 5 = 38400 \\ 6 = 57600 \\ 7 = 1152003 (9600 baud)
August 15, 2007, at 09:39 PM by David A. Mellis -
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BDThe baud rate used for serial communication with the Arduino board or computer.0 = 1200 bps, 1 = 2400, 2 = 4800, 3 = 9600, 4 = 19200, 5 = 38400, 6 = 57600, 7 = 1152003 (9600 baud)
to:
BDThe baud rate used for serial communication with the Arduino board or computer.0 = 1200 bps \\ 1 = 2400 \\ 2 = 4800 \\ 3 = 9600 \\ 4 = 19200 \\ 5 = 38400 \\ 6 = 57600 \\ 7 = 1152003 (9600 baud)
August 15, 2007, at 09:38 PM by David A. Mellis -
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IDThe network ID of the Xbee module. In most cases, a module will communicate with other modules that share the same network ID.0 - FFFF3332
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IDThe network ID of the Xbee module. In most cases, a module will communicate with other modules that share the same network ID.0 - FFFF3332
BDThe baud rate used for serial communication with the Arduino board or computer.0 = 1200 bps, 1 = 2400, 2 = 4800, 3 = 9600, 4 = 19200, 5 = 38400, 6 = 57600, 7 = 1152003 (9600 baud)
August 15, 2007, at 09:35 PM by David A. Mellis -
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IDThe network ID of the Xbee module. In most cases, a module will communicate with other modules that share the same network ID.0 - FFFF3332.)
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IDThe network ID of the Xbee module. In most cases, a module will communicate with other modules that share the same network ID.0 - FFFF3332
August 15, 2007, at 09:35 PM by David A. Mellis -
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CommandDescriptionValid ValuesDefault Value
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CommandDescriptionValid ValuesDefault Value
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ID (Valid Range: 0 - FFFF. Default value: 3332.)
The network ID of the Xbee module. In most cases, a module will communicate with other modules that share the same network ID.

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CommandDescriptionValid ValuesDefault Value
IDThe network ID of the Xbee module. In most cases, a module will communicate with other modules that share the same network ID.0 - FFFF3332.)
August 15, 2007, at 09:33 PM by David A. Mellis -
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ID - The network ID of the Xbee module. In most cases, a module will communicate with other modules that share the same network ID. Range: 0 - 0xFFFF. Default value: 3332.

to:

ID (Valid Range: 0 - FFFF. Default value: 3332.)
The network ID of the Xbee module. In most cases, a module will communicate with other modules that share the same network ID.

August 15, 2007, at 09:32 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Here are some of the more useful commands for configuring your Xbee module. For step-by-step instructions on using these commands, see the guide to the Xbee shield.

to:

Here are some of the more useful commands for configuring your Xbee module. For step-by-step instructions on using these commands, see the guide to the Xbee shield. When you use these commands, prepend AT to them (e.g. to use the ID command, you should type ATID).

ID - The network ID of the Xbee module. In most cases, a module will communicate with other modules that share the same network ID. Range: 0 - 0xFFFF. Default value: 3332.

August 15, 2007, at 09:26 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Here are some of the more useful commands for configuring your Xbee module. For step-by-step instructions on using these commands, see the guide to the Xbee shield.

August 15, 2007, at 08:44 PM by David A. Mellis -
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You can configure the Xbee module from the code running on the Arduino board or from software on the computer. To configure it from the Arduino board, you'll need to have the jumpers in the Xbee position. To configure it from the computer, you'll need to have the jumpers in the USB configuration and have removed the microncontroller from your Arduino board.

To get the module into configuration mode, you need to send it three plus signs: + and there needs to be at least a second before and after when you send no other character to the module. Note that this includes newlines or carriage return characters. Thus, if you're trying to configure the module from the computer, you need to make sure your terminal software is configured to send characters as you type them, without waiting for you to press enter. Otherwise, it will send the plus signs immediately followed by a newline (i.e. you won't get the needed one second delay after the +++). If you successfully enter configuration mode, the module will send back the two characters 'OK', followed by a carriage return. In a terminal, this will look like this (where the +++ was typed by you, and the OK returned by the module):

+++OK

Once in configuration mode, you can send AT commands to the module. Command strings have the form ATxx (where xx is the name of a setting). To read the current value of the setting, send the command string followed by a carriage return. To write a new value to the setting, send the command string, immediately followed by the new setting (with no spaces or newlines in-between), followed by a carriage return. For example, to read the network ID of the module (which determines which other Xbee modules it will communicate with), go into command mode and then type:

ATID

followed by a carriage return (i.e. pressing enter from within a terminal program). You should see:

3332

(the default ID of the module) or whatever value the ID was last set to.

To change the network ID of the module, type:

ATID3331

and press enter. You should get back:

OK

Now, check that the setting has taken effect by again asking for the ID:

ATID

(and pressing enter). You should see:

3331

August 15, 2007, at 08:43 PM by David A. Mellis -
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To change the network ID of the module, type:

ATID3331

and press enter. You should get back:

OK

Now, check that the setting has taken effect by again asking for the ID:

ATID

(and pressing enter). You should see:

3331

August 15, 2007, at 08:41 PM by David A. Mellis -
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In either case, to get the module into configuration mode, you need to send it three plus signs: + and there needs to be at least a second before and after when you send no other character to the module. Note that this includes newlines or carriage return characters. Thus, if you're trying to configure the module from the computer, you need to make sure your terminal software is configured to send characters as you type them, without waiting for you to press enter. Otherwise, it will send the plus signs immediately followed by a newline (i.e. you won't get the needed one second delay after the +++). If you successfully enter configuration mode, the module will send back the two characters 'OK', followed by a carriage return.

Once in configuration mode, you can send AT commands to the module. Command strings have the form ATxx (where xx is the name of a setting). To read the current value of the setting, send the command string followed by a carriage return. To write a new value to the setting, send the command string, immediately followed by the new setting (with no spaces or newlines in-between), followed by a carriage return.

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To get the module into configuration mode, you need to send it three plus signs: + and there needs to be at least a second before and after when you send no other character to the module. Note that this includes newlines or carriage return characters. Thus, if you're trying to configure the module from the computer, you need to make sure your terminal software is configured to send characters as you type them, without waiting for you to press enter. Otherwise, it will send the plus signs immediately followed by a newline (i.e. you won't get the needed one second delay after the +++). If you successfully enter configuration mode, the module will send back the two characters 'OK', followed by a carriage return. In a terminal, this will look like this (where the +++ was typed by you, and the OK returned by the module):

+++OK

Once in configuration mode, you can send AT commands to the module. Command strings have the form ATxx (where xx is the name of a setting). To read the current value of the setting, send the command string followed by a carriage return. To write a new value to the setting, send the command string, immediately followed by the new setting (with no spaces or newlines in-between), followed by a carriage return. For example, to read the network ID of the module (which determines which other Xbee modules it will communicate with), go into command mode and then type:

ATID

followed by a carriage return (i.e. pressing enter from within a terminal program). You should see:

3332

(the default ID of the module) or whatever value the ID was last set to.

August 15, 2007, at 08:34 PM by David A. Mellis -
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You can configure the Xbee module from a sketch running on the Arduino board, or from a terminal program running on the computer. [explain jumper settings needed]

For details on configuring the Xbee module, see the product manual from MaxStream.

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You can configure the Xbee module from the code running on the Arduino board or from software on the computer. To configure it from the Arduino board, you'll need to have the jumpers in the Xbee position. To configure it from the computer, you'll need to have the jumpers in the USB configuration and have removed the microncontroller from your Arduino board.

In either case, to get the module into configuration mode, you need to send it three plus signs: + and there needs to be at least a second before and after when you send no other character to the module. Note that this includes newlines or carriage return characters. Thus, if you're trying to configure the module from the computer, you need to make sure your terminal software is configured to send characters as you type them, without waiting for you to press enter. Otherwise, it will send the plus signs immediately followed by a newline (i.e. you won't get the needed one second delay after the +++). If you successfully enter configuration mode, the module will send back the two characters 'OK', followed by a carriage return.

Once in configuration mode, you can send AT commands to the module. Command strings have the form ATxx (where xx is the name of a setting). To read the current value of the setting, send the command string followed by a carriage return. To write a new value to the setting, send the command string, immediately followed by the new setting (with no spaces or newlines in-between), followed by a carriage return.

For more details on configuring the Xbee module, see the product manual from MaxStream.

August 15, 2007, at 08:21 PM by David A. Mellis -
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The Xbee shield allows an Arduino board to communicate wirelessly using Zigbee. It is based on the Xbee module from MaxStream. The module can communicate up to 100 feet indoors or 300 feet outdoors (with line-of-sight). It can be used as a serial/usb replacement or you can put it into a command mode and configure it.

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The Xbee shield allows an Arduino board to communicate wirelessly using Zigbee. It is based on the Xbee module from MaxStream. The module can communicate up to 100 feet indoors or 300 feet outdoors (with line-of-sight). It can be used as a serial/usb replacement or you can put it into a command mode and configure it for a variety of broadcast and mesh networking options.

August 15, 2007, at 08:20 PM by David A. Mellis -
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XbeeShieldSchematic.jpg

August 15, 2007, at 08:19 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Schematic

Overview

August 15, 2007, at 08:12 PM by David A. Mellis -
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With the jumpers in the Xbee position (i.e. on the two pins towards the interior of the board), the DOUT pin of the Xbee module is connected to the RX pin of the microcontroller; and DIN is connected to TX. Note that the RX and TX pins of the microcontroller are still connected to the TX and RX pins (respectively) of the FTDI chip - data sent from the microcontroller will be transmitted to the computer via USB as well as being sent wirelessly by the Xbee module. The microcontroller, however, will only be able to receive data from the Xbee module, not over USB from the computer.

With the jumpers in the USB position (i.e. on the two pins nearest the edge of the board), the DOUT pin the Xbee module is connected to the RX pin of the FTDI chip, and DIN on the Xbee module is connected to the TX pin of the FTDI chip. This means that the Xbee module can communicate directly with the computer - however, this only works if the microcontroller has been removed from the Arduino board. If the microcontroller is left in the Arduino board, it will be able to talk to the computer normally via USB, but neither the computer nor the microcontroller will be able to talk to the Xbee module.

August 15, 2007, at 07:55 PM by David A. Mellis -
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The Xbee shield has two jumpers (the small removable plastic sleeves that each fit onto two of the three pins labelled Xbee/USB). These determine how the Xbee's serial communication connects to the serial communication between the microcontroller (ATmega8 or ATmega168) and FTDI USB-to-serial chip on the Arduino board.

August 15, 2007, at 07:52 PM by David A. Mellis -
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You can configure the Xbee module from a sketch running on the Arduino board, or from a terminal program running on the computer.

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You can configure the Xbee module from a sketch running on the Arduino board, or from a terminal program running on the computer. [explain jumper settings needed]

August 15, 2007, at 07:51 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Jumper Settings

Configuration

You can configure the Xbee module from a sketch running on the Arduino board, or from a terminal program running on the computer.

For details on configuring the Xbee module, see the product manual from MaxStream.

August 15, 2007, at 07:49 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Xbee Shield

The Xbee shield allows an Arduino board to communicate wirelessly using Zigbee. It is based on the Xbee module from MaxStream. The module can communicate up to 100 feet indoors or 300 feet outdoors (with line-of-sight). It can be used as a serial/usb replacement or you can put it into a command mode and configure it.

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