Main.Environment History

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November 05, 2006, at 12:23 PM by David A. Mellis - redirecting to the guide.
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October 21, 2006, at 10:24 PM by David A. Mellis - updating in preparation for Arduino 0006
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Displays serial data being sent from the Arduino board (USB or serial board). Uses the baud rate (serial speed) specified in the Tools | Serial Monitor Baud Rate menu, which must match the baud rate passed to the beginSerial command in your sketch.

In Arduino 0005 and later, you can send data from the computer to the Arduino board. Pressing the "send" button will send the characters you've entered. Pressing enter will send the characters followed by a newline. In older versions of Arduino, you'll need to use another program to send data to the Arduino board. Try HyperTerminal (on Windows) or ZTerm (on the Mac). You can also talk to the board from Processing, Flash, MaxMSP, etc (see the interfacing page for details).

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Displays serial data being sent from the Arduino board (USB or serial board). To send data to the board, enter text and click on the "send" button or press enter (in Arduino 0005, pressing enter appends a newline to your text, this was removed in Arduino 0006). Choose the baud rate from the drop-down that matches the rate passed to Serial.begin in your sketch (in version of Arduino prior to 0006, the baud rate is specified in the Tools | Serial Monitor Baud Rate menu).

You can also talk to the board from Processing, Flash, MaxMSP, etc (see the interfacing page for details).

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Serial Monitor Baud Rate

This menu item controls the baud rate (speed) that the serial monitor uses to communicate with a sketch running on the Arduino board. It must match the value passed to in the code of the sketch.

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Serial Monitor Baud Rate (Arduino 0005 and earlier)

This menu item controls the baud rate (speed) that the serial monitor uses to communicate with a sketch running on the Arduino board. It must match the value passed to in the code of the sketch. In Arduino 0006, this baud rate is set from a drop-down in the status bar when the serial monitor is enabled.

August 27, 2006, at 12:00 PM by David A. Mellis -
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In Arduino 0005 and later, you can send data from the computer to the Arduino board. Pressing the "send" button will send the characters you've entered. Pressing enter will send the characters followed by a newline. In older versions of Arduino, you'll need to use another program to send data to the Arduino board. Try HyperTerminal (on Windows) or ZTerm (on the Mac). You can also talk to the board from Processing, Flash, MaxMSP, etc (see theinterfacing page for details).

to:

In Arduino 0005 and later, you can send data from the computer to the Arduino board. Pressing the "send" button will send the characters you've entered. Pressing enter will send the characters followed by a newline. In older versions of Arduino, you'll need to use another program to send data to the Arduino board. Try HyperTerminal (on Windows) or ZTerm (on the Mac). You can also talk to the board from Processing, Flash, MaxMSP, etc (see the interfacing page for details).

August 27, 2006, at 12:00 PM by David A. Mellis -
Changed lines 50-51 from:

In Arduino 0005 and later, you can send data from the computer to the Arduino board. Pressing the "send" button will send the characters you've entered. Pressing enter will send the characters followed by a newline. In older versions of Arduino, you'll need to use another program to send data to the Arduino board. Try HyperTerminal (on Windows) or ZTerm (on the Mac). You can also talk to the board from Processing, Flash, MaxMSP, etc.

to:

In Arduino 0005 and later, you can send data from the computer to the Arduino board. Pressing the "send" button will send the characters you've entered. Pressing enter will send the characters followed by a newline. In older versions of Arduino, you'll need to use another program to send data to the Arduino board. Try HyperTerminal (on Windows) or ZTerm (on the Mac). You can also talk to the board from Processing, Flash, MaxMSP, etc (see theinterfacing page for details).

August 27, 2006, at 11:59 AM by David A. Mellis -
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Note: the serial monitor currently only supports data coming from the Arduino board to the computer. If you need to send data to the board, you'll need to use another program like HyperTerminal (on Windows) or ZTerm (on the Mac). Or you can talk to the board from Processing, Flash, MaxMSP, etc.

to:

In Arduino 0005 and later, you can send data from the computer to the Arduino board. Pressing the "send" button will send the characters you've entered. Pressing enter will send the characters followed by a newline. In older versions of Arduino, you'll need to use another program to send data to the Arduino board. Try HyperTerminal (on Windows) or ZTerm (on the Mac). You can also talk to the board from Processing, Flash, MaxMSP, etc.

August 27, 2006, at 11:55 AM by David A. Mellis -
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This baud rate does not affect the process of uploading sketches to the Arduino board. That depends on the serial.download_rate variable in the preferences.txt file (see the FAQ for more details).

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This baud rate does not affect the process of uploading sketches to the Arduino board; see the FAQ if you need to change that.

August 27, 2006, at 11:54 AM by David A. Mellis -
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Microcontroller (MCU)

This menu lets you choose which microcontroller you're using; it should match the name (up to the dash) of the chip on your Arduino board (e.g. if your chip says "ATMEGA8-16PI", you would choose "atmega8"). Almost all Arduino boards use the atmega8, but the new Arduino stamps use the atmega168 (which can hold programs which are twice as big).

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This burns the bootloader to your Arduino board, using an an AVR-ISP connected to the serial port selected in the Serial Port submenu. For more details see the bootloader page.

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This burns the bootloader to your Arduino board, using an an AVR-ISP connected to the serial port selected in the Serial Port submenu. This only works with the atmega8 (not the atmega168). For more details see the bootloader page.

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Windows and Linux only. Burns the bootloader to your Arduino board, using a parallel programmer.

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Windows and Linux only. Burns the bootloader to your Arduino board, using a parallel programmer. This only works with the atmega8 (not the atmega168).

May 12, 2006, at 11:16 AM by David A. Mellis - moving library info to separate page]
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Uses a library in your sketch. Works by adding #includes to the top of your code. This makes extra functionality available to your sketch, but increases its size. To stop using a library, delete the appropriate #includes from the top of your sketch. For more details, see Libraries below.

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Uses a library in your sketch. Works by adding #includes to the top of your code. This makes extra functionality available to your sketch, but increases its size. To stop using a library, delete the appropriate #includes from the top of your sketch. For more details, see the page on libraries.

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Some preferences can be set in the preferences dialog (found under the Arduino menu on the Mac, or File on Windows and Linux). The rest can be found in the preferences.txt file.

Libraries

Libraries provide your sketches with extra functionality (e.g. the ability to control an LED matrix, or read an encoder, etc.). They were introduced in Arduino 0004.

To install a library, place it in its own folder inside ARDUINO/lib/targets/libraries. It will then appear in the Sketch | Import Library menu in the Arduino IDE. To use a library in a sketch, select it from that menu while editing the sketch. This will insert at the top of the sketch an #include statement for each header file (ending in .h) in the library's folder. These statements make available to your sketch the functions and constants defined by the library. They also signal the Arduino environment to link that library's code (contained in files ending with .c or .cpp) with your sketch it is compiled or uploaded.

Because libraries are uploaded to the board with your sketch, they increase the amount of space used on the ATmega8 on the board. If a sketch no longer needs a library, simply delete its #include statements from the top of your code. This will stop the Arduino IDE from linking the library with your sketch and decrease the amount of space used on the Arduino board.

To get started writing libraries, download this test library. It should provide a basic guide for creating a new library.

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Some preferences can be set in the preferences dialog (found under the Arduino menu on the Mac, or File on Windows and Linux). The rest can be found in the preferences.txt file.

May 12, 2006, at 11:12 AM by David A. Mellis - adding link to example library
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Because libraries are uploaded to the board with your sketch, they increase the amount of space used on the ATmega8 on the board. If a sketch no longer needs a library, simply delete its #include statements from the top of your code. This will stop the Arduino IDE from linking the library with your sketch and decrease the amount of space used on the Arduino board.

to:

Because libraries are uploaded to the board with your sketch, they increase the amount of space used on the ATmega8 on the board. If a sketch no longer needs a library, simply delete its #include statements from the top of your code. This will stop the Arduino IDE from linking the library with your sketch and decrease the amount of space used on the Arduino board.

To get started writing libraries, download this test library. It should provide a basic guide for creating a new library.

May 01, 2006, at 04:04 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Some preferences can be set in the preferences dialog (found under the Arduino menu on the Mac, or File on Windows and Linux). The rest can be found in the preferences.txt file. The location of this file is displayed at the bottom of the preferences dialog. Edit it only when Arduino's not running (or your changes will be overwritten when Arduino exits).

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Some preferences can be set in the preferences dialog (found under the Arduino menu on the Mac, or File on Windows and Linux). The rest can be found in the preferences.txt file.

April 27, 2006, at 12:21 PM by David A. Mellis - Describing libraries
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Uses a library in your sketch. Works by adding #includes for the library header files. This signals the Arduino IDE to link those libraries against your sketch when verifying and uploading. This makes extra functionality available to your sketch, but increases its size. To stop using a library, delete the appropriate #includes from the top of your sketch.

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Uses a library in your sketch. Works by adding #includes to the top of your code. This makes extra functionality available to your sketch, but increases its size. To stop using a library, delete the appropriate #includes from the top of your sketch. For more details, see Libraries below.

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Libraries

Libraries provide your sketches with extra functionality (e.g. the ability to control an LED matrix, or read an encoder, etc.). They were introduced in Arduino 0004.

To install a library, place it in its own folder inside ARDUINO/lib/targets/libraries. It will then appear in the Sketch | Import Library menu in the Arduino IDE. To use a library in a sketch, select it from that menu while editing the sketch. This will insert at the top of the sketch an #include statement for each header file (ending in .h) in the library's folder. These statements make available to your sketch the functions and constants defined by the library. They also signal the Arduino environment to link that library's code (contained in files ending with .c or .cpp) with your sketch it is compiled or uploaded.

Because libraries are uploaded to the board with your sketch, they increase the amount of space used on the ATmega8 on the board. If a sketch no longer needs a library, simply delete its #include statements from the top of your code. This will stop the Arduino IDE from linking the library with your sketch and decrease the amount of space used on the Arduino board.

April 27, 2006, at 12:08 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Preferences

Some preferences can be set in the preferences dialog (found under the Arduino menu on the Mac, or File on Windows and Linux). The rest can be found in the preferences.txt file. The location of this file is displayed at the bottom of the preferences dialog. Edit it only when Arduino's not running (or your changes will be overwritten when Arduino exits).

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April 27, 2006, at 12:07 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Toolbar Buttons

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Toolbar

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Sketch

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Menus

Sketch

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Tools

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Tools

April 27, 2006, at 12:06 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Verify/Compile

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Verify/Compile

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Stop

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Stop

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New

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New

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Open

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Open

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Save

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Save

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Upload to I/O Board

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Upload to I/O Board

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Serial Monitor

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Serial Monitor

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Sketch Menu

Verify/Compile

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Sketch

Verify/Compile

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Import Library

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Import Library

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Tools Menu

Auto Format

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Tools

Auto Format

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Serial Port

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Serial Port

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Serial Monitor Baud Rate

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Serial Monitor Baud Rate

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Burn Bootloader

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Burn Bootloader

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Burn Bootloader (parallel)

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Burn Bootloader (parallel)

April 27, 2006, at 12:04 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Windows and Linux only'. Burns the bootloader to your Arduino board, using a parallel programmer.

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April 27, 2006, at 12:01 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Checks your code for errors.
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Checks your code for errors.

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Stops the serial monitor, or unhighlight other buttons.
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Stops the serial monitor, or unhighlight other buttons.

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Creates a new sketch.
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Creates a new sketch.

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Presents a menu of all the sketches in your sketchbook. Note: due to a bug in Java, this menu doesn't scroll; if you need to open a sketch late in the list, use the File | Sketchbook menu instead.
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Presents a menu of all the sketches in your sketchbook. Note: due to a bug in Java, this menu doesn't scroll; if you need to open a sketch late in the list, use the File | Sketchbook menu instead.

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Saves your sketch.
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Saves your sketch.

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Uploads your code to the Arduino I/O board. Make sure to save or verify your sketch before uploading it.
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Uploads your code to the Arduino I/O board. Make sure to save or verify your sketch before uploading it.

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Displays serial data being sent from the Arduino board (USB or serial board). Uses the baud rate (serial speed) specified in the Tools | Serial Monitor Baud Rate menu, which must match the baud rate passed to the beginSerial command in your sketch.
to:

Displays serial data being sent from the Arduino board (USB or serial board). Uses the baud rate (serial speed) specified in the Tools | Serial Monitor Baud Rate menu, which must match the baud rate passed to the beginSerial command in your sketch.

April 27, 2006, at 12:01 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Checks your code for errors.

to:
Checks your code for errors.
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Stops the serial monitor, or unhighlight other buttons.

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Stops the serial monitor, or unhighlight other buttons.
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Creates a new sketch.

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Creates a new sketch.
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Presents a menu of all the sketches in your sketchbook. Note: due to a bug in Java, this menu doesn't scroll; if you need to open a sketch late in the list, use the File | Sketchbook menu instead.

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Presents a menu of all the sketches in your sketchbook. Note: due to a bug in Java, this menu doesn't scroll; if you need to open a sketch late in the list, use the File | Sketchbook menu instead.
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Saves your sketch.

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Saves your sketch.
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Uploads your code to the Arduino I/O board. Make sure to save or verify your sketch before uploading it.

to:
Uploads your code to the Arduino I/O board. Make sure to save or verify your sketch before uploading it.
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Displays serial data being sent from the Arduino board (USB or serial board). Uses the baud rate (serial speed) specified in the Tools | Serial Monitor Baud Rate menu, which must match the baud rate passed to the beginSerial command in your sketch.

to:
Displays serial data being sent from the Arduino board (USB or serial board). Uses the baud rate (serial speed) specified in the Tools | Serial Monitor Baud Rate menu, which must match the baud rate passed to the beginSerial command in your sketch.
April 27, 2006, at 11:55 AM by David A. Mellis - adding pictures of toolbar buttons
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April 09, 2006, at 03:31 PM by David A. Mellis -
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April 09, 2006, at 03:30 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Before uploading your sketch, you need to select the item from this menu that represents your Arduino board. On the Mac, this is probably something like /dev/tty.usbserial-1B1 (for a USB board), or /dev/tty.USA19QW1b1P1.1 (for a serial board connected with a Keyspan USB-to-Serial adapter). On Windows, it's probably COM1 or COM2 (for a serial board) or COM4, COM5, COM7, or higher (for a USB board) - to find out, you look for FTDI in the ports section of the Windows Device Manager.

to:

Before uploading your sketch, you need to select the item from this menu that represents your Arduino board. On the Mac, this is probably something like /dev/tty.usbserial-1B1 (for a USB board), or /dev/tty.USA19QW1b1P1.1 (for a serial board connected with a Keyspan USB-to-Serial adapter). On Windows, it's probably COM1 or COM2 (for a serial board) or COM4, COM5, COM7, or higher (for a USB board) - to find out, you look for USB serial device in the ports section of the Windows Device Manager.

April 09, 2006, at 03:26 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Preferences

Some preferences can be set in the preferences dialog (found under the Arduino menu on the Mac, or File on Windows and Linux). The rest can be found in the preferences.txt file. The location of this file is displayed at the bottom of the preferences dialog. Edit it only when Arduino's not running (or your changes will be overwritten when Arduino exits).

April 09, 2006, at 03:22 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Note: the serial monitor currently only supports data coming from the Arduino board to the computer. If you need to send data to the board, you'll need to use another program like HyperTerminal (on Windows) or ZTerm (on the Mac). Or you can talk to the board from Processing, Flash, MaxMSP, etc.

April 09, 2006, at 03:20 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Sketch Menu

Verify/Compile

Checks your sketch for errors.

Import Library

Uses a library in your sketch. Works by adding #includes for the library header files. This signals the Arduino IDE to link those libraries against your sketch when verifying and uploading. This makes extra functionality available to your sketch, but increases its size. To stop using a library, delete the appropriate #includes from the top of your sketch.

April 09, 2006, at 03:13 PM by David A. Mellis -
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This checks your code for errors.

to:

Checks your code for errors.

Stop

Stops the serial monitor, or unhighlight other buttons.

New

Creates a new sketch.

Open

Presents a menu of all the sketches in your sketchbook. Note: due to a bug in Java, this menu doesn't scroll; if you need to open a sketch late in the list, use the File | Sketchbook menu instead.

Save

Saves your sketch.

Upload to I/O Board

Uploads your code to the Arduino I/O board. Make sure to save or verify your sketch before uploading it.

Serial Monitor

Displays serial data being sent from the Arduino board (USB or serial board). Uses the baud rate (serial speed) specified in the Tools | Serial Monitor Baud Rate menu, which must match the baud rate passed to the beginSerial command in your sketch.

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This burns the bootloader to your Arduino board, using an an AVR-ISP connected to the serial port selected in the Serial Port submenu. For more details see the bootloader page.

to:

This burns the bootloader to your Arduino board, using an an AVR-ISP connected to the serial port selected in the Serial Port submenu. For more details see the bootloader page.

Burn Bootloader (parallel)

Windows and Linux only'. Burns the bootloader to your Arduino board, using a parallel programmer.

April 01, 2006, at 12:09 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Verify/Compile

This checks your code for errors.

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Auto Format

This formats your code nicely: i.e. indents it so that opening and closing curly braces line up, and that the statements instead curly braces are indented more.

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This baud rate does not affect the process of uploading sketches to the Arduino board. That depends on the serial.download_rate variable in the preferences.txt file (see the FAQ for more details).

to:

This baud rate does not affect the process of uploading sketches to the Arduino board. That depends on the serial.download_rate variable in the preferences.txt file (see the FAQ for more details).

Burn Bootloader

This burns the bootloader to your Arduino board, using an an AVR-ISP connected to the serial port selected in the Serial Port submenu. For more details see the bootloader page.

March 31, 2006, at 12:34 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Toolbar Buttons

March 31, 2006, at 12:32 PM by David A. Mellis -
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Serial Port

This menu contains all the serial devices (real or virtual) on your machine. It should automatically refresh every time you open the top-level tools menu.

Before uploading your sketch, you need to select the item from this menu that represents your Arduino board. On the Mac, this is probably something like /dev/tty.usbserial-1B1 (for a USB board), or /dev/tty.USA19QW1b1P1.1 (for a serial board connected with a Keyspan USB-to-Serial adapter). On Windows, it's probably COM1 or COM2 (for a serial board) or COM4, COM5, COM7, or higher (for a USB board) - to find out, you look for FTDI in the ports section of the Windows Device Manager.

March 31, 2006, at 11:50 AM by David A. Mellis - Starting a guide to the Arduino environment (IDE).
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Arduino Environment

Tools Menu

Serial Monitor Baud Rate

This menu item controls the baud rate (speed) that the serial monitor uses to communicate with a sketch running on the Arduino board. It must match the value passed to in the code of the sketch.

This baud rate does not affect the process of uploading sketches to the Arduino board. That depends on the serial.download_rate variable in the preferences.txt file (see the FAQ for more details).

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